so how about it guys smash that like button hit the subscribe and stay with me for this awesome crosscut sled bill that's got an added feature that you don't want to miss stay with me right here like any good tool as I said before requires a good foundation that's why I'm making mine as big as I am I've had one bigger in the past but it got to be a little cumbersome to move around the shop so I size it down since I like the size and shape of the other one that's one I'm going to mimic so first break down a 4×8 sheet of plywood on a set of sawhorses using my circular saw and a straight edge guide I also score the cross grain to make sure that the splintering is kept down to a minimum once I'm done I put up that sheet and keep the one that I cut off and cut it down to size on my table saw now I plan on using the solid aluminum 24 inch miter bars the reason for that is because I've made wood runners in the past and due to expansion and contraction even though I made them with quarter sawn oak they still sometimes drag this will eliminate that inconsistency plus they have these adjustment screws that are made from nylon that you can adjust over the course of time if you find that your sled gets a little sloppy if you can't afford something like this and you want to make some hard wood runners I'll leave a link down in the description below of two videos one of mine and one of a brilliant description from William ain't I plan on installing these however before I do I have a few more tests that I need to make on the table saw installing these is going to require covering up my blade so I'm going to have to continue on doing some other things before I do this now it's time to make the fence I'm going to make it out of hardwood which is ash and I want the fence itself to be overall six inches tall however it will step down after a little bit and continue out at three inches so I'm going to rip this down to three inches and then laminate it together for the bottom part of the pin and then I'm going to do the same top now these mitre bars are milled to a certain specification what I mean by that is when they're placed inside the miter slot they sit below the surface by the tiniest fraction of an inch so in order to raise those up I'm going to stick some dimed which are the thinnest of all the coins because I don't need it raised up that much right inside the miter slots and then put the bar right on top of those this will make it fit proud of the table saw surface so when I go to place the plywood on that's all it will be touching and nothing else now because I know that my sense is perfectly parallel with my blade I'm going to use it as an aid to help me set the plywood on the miter bars themselves now I don't want the blade to be exactly Center of the sled because I want to be able to take care of any blind spots if I have 18 inches on this side and 18 inches on this side I don't have the versatility on left or right of the blade so I'm going to off-center it just a little bit so I can cover a certain amount here and a certain amount here so I've set the fence up at 18 inches which is off-center from the 30 inch overall width of the sled so I've taken the time to set the miter bars exactly flush to the back of the saw now I'm just going to apply some glue set the plywood up against the fence and then carefully lay it on top of the miter bars making sure that it's flush with the back edges then just put something heavy down on it until the glue cures all right now that's the glue is cured we can take it out of the miter slot then cut our sink these holes just a lot of it deeper so our screws can sit below the surface and it won't drag inside the miter slot now I plan on inserting some t-track inside the sled down the width of it to make it more versatile also plan on putting this in the fence but we'll take care of that later I've changed my blade out to the dado stack and after running a few test cuts I've got the depth and the width set to where the t-track it's just like a glove and is slightly lower than the surface of the sled so it does not catch now the design of my sled is not a traditional one I'm going to have a stabilizer bar here in the front that's actually going to be laying horizontal most of them are vertical so in order for me to be able to get bolt into the T track because the stabilizer bar is going to be covering up the end of the date oh one you have to back set the T track about an inch and a half from the end take a fine blade and score mark where the track meets the sled then I'll be able to cut it at the miter saw after running out of superglue I realized that I had some DAP rapid fuse it is after all CNR acrylate glue so I'll give it a try now the super glue is only temporary I'm just going to secure it with a few screws once we are done with the joiner fence we're just going to run them through the planer to clean them up now after cutting the fence the links on the table saw I brought it over to the router using a chamfer bit and at the base of the fence I've created a dust channel this will create a way for the dust to escape without causing inconsistencies when the stock meets the fence after cutting multiple pieces now with the help of sand push blocks for some safety and my data stack back in the table saw set 3/8 of an inch deep 3/4 of an inch wide I've created a channel in the very top of the fence that will allow a t-track could mount right there for some stop blocks that I can clamp down later I'm also going to create a channel in the bottom portion of the fence for some more t-track on either side of the blade now if you remember from my previous sled I actually had some curvatures around the front just to take off the blockiness that the plywood stands as it is right now and the easiest way to go about doing that for a simple pattern is take a quart size paint can or stain can and use that as your pattern we're going to measure two inches from the side because I've got an inch overhang from the edge of the sled to the edge of the fence it doesn't go all the way to the edge then I measure half the thickness of my sense from the edge of the back of the sled and that's 3/4 of an inch is that halfway point and I draw a line across those two points and this will be my pivot point that will come into play in the squaring of the fence now we're just going to go back up through that hole we made into the fence pre-drill for a screw hole and we're just going to raise it up a little bit to pierce the bottom of the sled we're going to use a framing square to help square up the blade as much as possible to make the five cut method as easy as possible with minimal movement of the fence now the next step is to raise the blade back up through the sled and then run it through the fence now first we're going to take our board and establish a base line we're going to make a series of five cuts to determine how far out of square our fence actually is this will be cut one two three four and our fifth and final cut we're then going to cut a thin strip off of this edge and measure the top and bottom ends to find out how far out of square we are then using William Inc v cut equation will apply all the math necessary to determine where we need to move our fence to get it just perfect so now that we know those measurements we're just going to subtract the top from the bottom then take that answer and divide it by four which are the four cuts that we just did take that answer and divide it by the length of the piece that you cut off which in our case with 12 and 7/8 which is twelve point eight seven five when you divide it out take the answer from that and multiply it by the length of your fence from the pivot point to the end of the other end and whatever you're left with is how far off out of square that your fence truly is and in our case it is 18-point for thousands we're just going to call it 18,000 of an inch out of alignment of an inch when I did my calculations the number that I came up with was a negative number because of that it tells me that my fence needs to go forward if I had a positive number I would need to move it backward now to begin you're going to need to find the 18000 shim if this is your measurement slide it in between your piece that you cut a point on because you have to pull you have to have 18,000 to move forward so you got to put something in the way so you just push it up to the 18,000 it's kind of snug now the original screw that we put in here we're going to take out now just scoot the fence forward into your point now because the hole that we made previously was set up for the old alignment we definitely don't want to use it again because it will just pull the fence right back into place so we need to make a new hole now after checking my measurements on the top and bottom I am off nine thousandths of an inch right now I want to get it a little bit lower so I'm going to attempt the method one more time we'll see how good we get so after taking another go at it I managed to get it down to five thousandths of an inch that's another four thousandths better than I had it before I think I'm going to call it good with that the last sled that I made I got down to two thousand seven inch and that may have just been dumb luck now I've always had a few people ask me why do I have so many drills well they're handy one to pre-drill one to countersink the other one to drive in the screw these changing bits every time all right now with the fence secured all the slips is to put in the T tracks on top and bottom and then to add one more surprise I'm not going to break that to you just yet now all I've done is I've raised the blade up to its max height and I've ran it through the fence what that did is establish the kerf line that will allow me to cut the T track just right to where I can get it as close as possible let's go ahead and cut those out now all I'm doing here is just chamfering the ends of the T track to match the chamfers on the sled itself this way I don't catch them on anything now when it comes to safety of crosscut sled you really want to have a blade guard on the backside I've never put one on so I'm going to do that this time but I'm going to add one cool thing to it yeah it's a blade guard but it's also dust collection now the one big thing that I absolutely despise about my old sled is all the dust that got shot back out of the kerf onto my shirt and also all the dust that would be created here on top of the sled just from taking a blade width off of a piece of wood now in combination with my big this collection and this desk collector this thing has no des on it whatsoever after two cuts of less than to play with and they blade with off of this one piece of pine it is excellent I didn't know it was going to work this well but I am super ecstatic with having dust collection port right on my crosscut sled so guys thank you very much for sticking with me through this long process it has been a pleasure getting to share this with you and I cannot wait to make a few more things that is going to be part of this slit all of the jigs that I've made in the past are now going to be all combined into one so stick around for the build process that will continue on this sled you're going to love it thank you guys very much I will talk to you next time be sure and smash that like button hit the subscribe if you haven't done it yet and I will see you on the next build one two three you

Ultimate Crosscut Sled with Dust Collection
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37 thoughts on “Ultimate Crosscut Sled with Dust Collection

  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    PARABÉNS, quanta habilidade e carinho, o Amigo é muito bom para explicar, até tirei umas dúvidas assistindo o vídeo! Obrigado por compartilhar comigo seus conhecimentos.
    Abraço aqui do Brasil 🇧🇷

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Great sled and presentation! Nicely done, now I have to attempt!

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Yeah too much hoopla at the beginning and end

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    I’m a new comer to your site. The presentation is spot on. I have found the sled I have been looking for. Thanks.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    This is the first of your videos I have watched. I am 2 minutes in and already in awe of your shop. You just got a new subscriber.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Great build. My biggest problem with most of the projects I see is trying to find decent Baltic Birch near me. All we have up here is big box stores with plywood you could use for a Bombay Dresser.

    One note: I haven't seen the rest of your videos yet, but would it make sense to put a hose clamp on the back of the fence to support the dust collection hose? It would make sure there's no drag when sliding it.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Drew – clever design with the flat front fence. But the reason you had to repeat the 5-cut method is because the last multiplier should be the entire length of the rear fence- from pivot point to the end, not just to the kerf. That would have produced a difference closer to the .027 or whatever the sum of your adjustments wound up being. I made the same mistake on my first 5-cut calcs.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Link for the adjustable factory made runners? Confused as to why this was not in your links?

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    you have more in clamps than i have invested in my shop

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Love your humor. Great job!

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    What kind of Clamps are those? Green ones

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    I have been looking at many cross cut sleds to build, I think this is the best one yet, I believe I will build it. Thanks

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Grate job, Thanks for posting… My thought would be to bring the Vac hose over the top and behind it's connection, otherwise the hose may drag on the table…

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Something is wrong with your calculations at 9:00. You measured an error of -0.00825 over 12.8750" which is -.00064078" of error per inch of length. You then multiplied this error per inch by the length from the pivot point to the end of the fence which was 12.75". (Notice this length is almost the same as the length of the strip you cut off. So the correction should be approximately the same as the error you measured because the two length are almost the same. So the correction should be -0.00064078 X 12.75" which is -0.008170, not 0.0184 that you show. So you corrected an amount over twice what it should have been which is why you were off so far with the second 5 cut method. Otherwise, good video.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    This seems like a solution looking for a problem to me. If you would have just put a plain ol' block of wood as a blade guard, it wouldn't be shooting any sawdust back at you. And you wouldn't have the dust collector hose hanging off the back of your sled snagging on the edge of your table saw every time you make a cut.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    The ultimate cross cut sled would be a bit closer to ultimate if it had routed in tracks for rail clamps or microjig dovetail clamps. No t-tracks needed, cheaper and much quicker to adjust to different sizes of wood. https://youtu.be/UuoqtK3L-MY

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Great video Drew. I just got my first "big boy" table saw and dust collector. I have a very small shed so space is key. Anyhow, I need a dust solution for my situation. I do resin casting so I'm always trimming resin blanks mainly for pen making. The trimmings or dust from these is a bit more "potent" than most wood. It piles up quick! So I made a sled with a bunch of hold down clamps that I use for trimming. My saw has a 4" funnel port on the bottom but most of the dust comes up and out the left side of the saw. Any ideas on something i can attach to my saw to catch that and run a Y-splitter on my collector? I have photos I can share if I can email you. Thanks again for a nice video.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Hi the dust things brilliant thanks good luck with the future

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Hi Drew, great addition to the cross cut sled dust collection, I have been using William NG method for years. You need to check out his video on how to properly chuck a drill bit.

    Question the vacuum source for the sled is that a separate vacuum such as a shop vac?

    Thanks

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Drew, can you explain the 5 cut method in depth. That was the only part I didn’t fully understand. I understand what you are doing, but I need a better explaination of how to do it. How much do you take off each side? How wide does the 5th cut need to be? Does it matter? I am about to build this and I want to make sure I don’t mess it up and drive myself crazy.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Could you please clarify. Ng multiplied the length of his right pivot to the left end of the fence. If I'm seeing right, your 12.875 is the distance from the blade to your left edge. Which is correct? THANKS

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Thanks for the video. I will be making some type of a sled and really like the guard and dust collector. I'm putting my woodshop in a small basement. Dust is a big issue. Is there any downside to having the hose to the DC coming from overhead?

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    What’s the width of the plywood you used? 3/4 in or 1/2 in?

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Allways like your show and allway smashing my like botton kaboooooooooom

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Nice video. I like the dust collector. I really liked the detailed explanation of the "5 cut method" of squaring up the sled, I had no choice be to subscribe. Thanks for making the video.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Hey man I read you're from Moore, OK. Kool, I'm down here in Lawton 🙁 I just wanted to add a note for anyone that my be having issues getting a good square off their fence if they have a positive correction. You'll need to add the feeler gauge after you clamp a stopping block snug against the fence and than remove the screw. This is as opposed to how you had to place the gauge with the stopping block before you removed the screw and moved the fence. Sorry if I made that more difficult than it should be. Great video, you have a new sub my fellow Okie.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Love the project, looks quite involved but I may give it a try, definitely the best I’ve seen. 👍🏾

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Rock-n sled dude! BOOM 😊

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Few problems I see, the dust collection tube will be dragging on the edge of the saw table becoming a pain.

    The timber guides will shrink and contract due to weather rendering the. 00005 accuracy ineffective

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Does the 5 cut board need to start out at a certain size, l x w?

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    AMeriKaww! Cool crosscut sled.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Best of the best !

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Hey… i want that shipped Free to me

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Awesome, I gotta have that ! Great idea

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  • June 20, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    It certainly appears as, the pivot hole and the end of the fence longer than 12.75". I'm estimating 26" this explains the lack of accuracy after moving the fence. Better study Ng's method a bit more.

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