– Thanks to Indochino
for keeping Legal Eagle in the air and helping me look fly. Humans have been jetting off into space since April 12th, 1961,
when Russian lieutenant Yuri Gagarin became the first
human to orbit the Earth. Alan Shepard became the first American to enter space less than a month later. Yes, that’s right, the Russians beat us to space by less than
a month, but who’s counting? We didn’t wanna be first in space anyway. It’s cold and it’s dark up there. Human space travel is
just a couple of years shy of celebrating its 60th birthday, which means 60 years of weightlessness, freeze-dried food, and figuring out how to use the bathroom
without any gravity. However, despite more than 50 years of humans traveling to
and living in space, NASA has never had to address
the issue of space pirates. No, I’m just kidding, space crime. But space crime is really
crazy and interesting, too. What happens when a crime
is committed in space? Who has jurisdiction? Who are the space police? And where is space jail? These are the questions
we’re going to answer today. (light trumpet music) Hey Legal Eagles, it’s time
to think like a lawyer. And today we are dealing with potentially the first case of space crime. Summer Worden, a former Air
Force intelligence officer, has accused her ex-spouse Anne McClain, a decorated NASA astronaut,
of identity theft and improper access to
private financial records. When Worden became suspicious of McClain, she asked her bank to trace
the location of any computers that had recently
accessed her bank account using her own login credentials. One of those computers, it turned out, was in outer space aboard the
International Space Station. Acknowledging that she had
indeed accessed Worden’s account while in outer space,
McClain defended her actions and claimed that she was merely taking care of the couple’s
intermingled finances. Nonetheless, Worden filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission and her family filed yet another complaint with NASA’s Office of Inspector General. Both could be historic
in that they contain the first allegation of
criminal wrongdoing in space. So let’s talk about the
history of space law. The Treaty on Principles
Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration
and Use of Outer Space including the Moon and
Other Celestial Bodies, or the Outer Space Treaty,
as it is more commonly known, was entered into by 105
different parties in 1967. The treaty was essentially
the Magna Carta of space law. It established general principles for the international use
of and exploration of space, favored commercial activities in space, and sought to ensure that the
exploration of outer space could be conducted only for
the benefit of all countries. Article six of the Outer Space Treaty also emphasized that all
nations would, quote, “bear international responsibility “for national activities in space, “whether these activities were carried out “by governmental or private parties.” Since entering into this
international agreement, the United States has
substantially developed its own national space law. Most recently, the extensive US space laws were recodified in 2010 in
Title 51 of the US code, which was enacted to
transfer a number of statutes dealing with national space programs into a single place in
the United States code. While Title 51 addresses a
number of space-related areas, it does not discuss
criminal acts in space. Title 51 does, however,
contain a blanket statement which presumably forbids any
sort of criminal activity. Quote, “This civil space station “may be used only for peaceful purposes.” 51 USC, section 70901. But what about the
International Space Station? The International Space Station was placed into orbit in
1984 by the United States, and other nations were
invited to participate in its development and use. In order to facilitate cooperation among the participating nations, Canada, the European partner states, Japan, Russia, and the United States, signed the agreement
concerning cooperation on the International
Space Station in 1998. Article 22 of the agreement also outlined criminal jurisdiction aboard the ISS, and determined that each
participating nation, quote, “may exercise criminal jurisdiction “over personnel in or
on any flight element “who are their respective nationals.” But what actually happens when a crime is committed onboard the ISS? To date, we’re still not entirely sure. But in discussing criminal
jurisdiction in space, many scholars have equated
intergalactic crimes with those committed
in Antarctica or at sea in an attempt to consider
what actual development space law would look like, and, of course, to avoid common pitfalls. By way of analogy, the Antarctic Treaty was signed in 1959 by 12 nations whose scientists had been
working on the continent. To date, there are a total of 54 parties to that particular treaty. Similarly to the respective
jurisdictional rules which govern the
International Space Station, the Antarctic Treaty provides that, quote, “observers, scientific personnel,
and members of the staffs “accompanying any such persons “shall be subject only to the jurisdiction “of the Contracting Party
of which they are nationals “in respect of all acts
or omissions occurring “while they are in Antarctica “for the purpose of
exercising their functions.” So, if you are a US national
doing research in Antarctica, the treaty seems to imply
that you are governed by the rules of the United States while you are domiciled in Antarctica. And, by analogy, if you’re in the ISS and you commit a crime, you’re governed by the laws of the United States. Still, the drafters of
the Antarctic Treaty left a lot of questions unanswered, and when in 2000 an
Australian astrophysicist died in the South Pole, the nations involved were unsure how to confront the fact that he was likely poisoned. After Dr. Marks unfortunately passed away, an autopsy was performed, and methanol was found in his system. For those of you who don’t
have advanced degrees in toxicology, which I
will assume is most of you, including myself, methanol
is a colorless liquid that smells a lot like ethanol, otherwise known as alcohol,
but that is far more toxic. So the question remained, did
Dr. Marks knowingly ingest a highly toxic substance,
or was he poisoned? The United States had an interest
in investigating the death since Marks died on a US base and was an employee of
an American contractor. New Zealand maintained its own interest in investigating Marks’ death since it considered the
location of the US base to fall within its own territorial claim. One officer from New
Zealand who handled the case stated that he could not rule out that the scientist’s demise
was the direct result of the act of another person in the base. However, despite those suspicions, unresolved jurisdictional questions, competing jurisdictional claims, and conflicting interests prevented anyone from ever getting to the
bottom of Dr. Marks’ death. To this day, no one knows
if he died by murder, suicide, or an unfortunate accident. In a similar way, international waters pose similar jurisdictional
questions and conflicts with those raised in
Antarctica and in space. Maybe at some point this will
have to be an additional video because if I had a nickel
for every time a Legal Eagle asked me to cover maritime law
and the law of the high seas, I would be a very, very rich man. At the United Nations
Conference on the Law of the Sea held in 1958, certain
provisions were adopted to regulate activities
in international waters. Articles five and six
respectively state that, quote, “Ships have the nationality of the State “whose flag they are entitled to fly, “in particular, the State
must effectively exercise “its jurisdiction and
control in administrative, “technical and social matters
over ships flying its flag.” And, quote, “ships shall sail.” That’s so hard to say. “Under the flag of one State
only and shall be subject “to exclusive jurisdiction
on the high seas.” (sighs) I’m so glad I was able
to say that correctly. A fugitive or a criminal sailing on a ship in international waters
is therefore subject to the laws and regulations
of whatever country the vessel is registered to. The United States can also
exercise special jurisdiction in international waters,
such as when, quote, “Any place outside the
jurisdiction of any nation “with respect to an offense by or against “a national of the United
States,” end quote, is involved. Despite the uncertainty that
still surrounds space law, however, many say that with
the onset of space tourism we’ll soon have no choice
but to expand the laws that govern the
International Space Station. And frankly, that’s how our law was created in the first place. American law is a subset
of English common law, which means that the law was created, basically, as judges went along. They got a new case and
when there were new facts that had to be adjudicated
for the first time, they just kind of made it up as they went. In contrast to a lot of
the civil law societies in Europe, where the law is codified and judges just simply follow that and they never have discretion in terms of creating new common law on their own. And the funny thing is that
when you’re in law school, you read a ton of railroad cases, because in the 18th and 19th centuries, trains were the newfangled
technology of the day and required courts to wrestle
with new legal principles to deal with new legal situations. So really, when you think about it, rocket ships and
International Space Stations are just the trains of today. Without wheels. In space. And as Mark Sundahl of the
Global Space Law Center said, the more we go out there
and spend time out there, all the things that we do here
are going to happen in space. Since Worden and her family
filed their complaints against McClain, an
investigator specializing in criminal cases with NASA’s
Office of Inspector General has begun to look into the issue surrounding these novel circumstances. While no charges have been filed, a seemingly trivial domestic dispute could get the ball
rolling and push the US, and presumably other space
powers, to take a hard look at their interstellar criminal
laws, or lack thereof. You know, before we know
it, everything that happens down here on Earth will
eventually happen in space. And while that may eventually
mean shopping on the moon and yoga on Mars, it could
also very well mean crime that’s out of this world. Now, if you go into space,
you’ll need a spacesuit, but if you’re back here on
Earth, you need an actual suit. If you’re looking for
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of your entire life. So, do you agree with my analysis? Are you worried about space crime? Or do you think the current
laws already deal with it? Leave your objections in the comments and check out this playlist over here for all of my other real law reviews where we cover all of the
legal topics of the day where I will see you in court.

The World’s First Space Crime? IN SPACE! (Real Law Review)
Tagged on:                                                                                                                                                                 

100 thoughts on “The World’s First Space Crime? IN SPACE! (Real Law Review)

  • September 20, 2019 at 4:04 pm
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    Get any premium INDOCHINO suit for only $359 https://bit.ly/2IeeB8W

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 1:57 am
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    Nice video, still doesnt explain why you got Adam/YMS dressed like a space pirate in your thumbnail

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 1:59 am
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    I'm sure you're just referencing something but I want to mention this because I'm kind of a space nerd. Intergalactic means being situated or travelling between galaxies. If she committed identity theft while she was traveling to another galaxy then it would definitely be intergalactic identity theft. I'm not exactly sure what the correct way to call this would be, since obviously this is a new situation but I'd guess this would either be interplanetary or orbital identity theft. Interplanetary refers to being situated or traveling between planets (which is about as close to an 'inter-something' term that I can find to this), and orbital because she did it while she was orbiting the planet earth.

    As an aside though, if she committed it while travelling to another star, it would be interstellar identity theft. If she were traveling to another planet in the same star system it would be called Interplanetary Identity Theft.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 1:59 am
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    Did you know?
    Even though women make up for 49% of the worlds population, they are responsible for 100% of crimes in space.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 2:42 am
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    Objection: The crime that is out of this world bit is blatant theft of the CSI meme. Also, those shades probably needed a darker suit to work better. Love your channel.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 3:46 am
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    I’ve been watching your videos for a while and I was wondering how could a young person without much money start a part towards a career in law?

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 3:53 am
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    So women caused 100% of space crimes?

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  • September 23, 2019 at 5:01 am
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    every time I watch your vids I learned something, this stuff can become convoluted quick

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  • September 23, 2019 at 5:39 am
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    Objection! The International Space Station was launched in 1998, and it was planned as a joint venture by various nations (The US and Russia, primarily) since the beginning of its life

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 6:16 am
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    If one wanted to become the first space lawyer how would you go about such a task

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 6:28 am
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    There will need to be new laws soon in the next ten years, when people start fighting for resources on the moon or from asteroids China will step in and take it all, so we need tough space laws.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 6:50 am
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    Objection! Just clicking the link helps you then I'll cook it all day, but is that what helps you?

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 7:43 am
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    Objection! Go old school pirate laws and just kick that bitch out of the spaceship.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 7:46 am
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    But the thumbnail is some dude because normies can't accept yet women commit 100℅ of space crime

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Awesome video. Now I cant get a indochino suit, cause well, I am in Europe 😛 but I can tell, a nice, well made suit is awesome. wish I could finish my programming homework and get a job, even tho I love wearing tshirts and jeans, the guys I bought my suit from told me wich colors I can match parts of my suits with. So even as a nerd that I am, a suit really can be part of your wardrobe. I just never seen a Astronaut wear a suit in space. First space trial when? Love your videos LegalEagel aka Devin 😀

    There is this ceremonial spacesuit they wear in space, with the flag on their chest in sort of a V shape, love the design of that "jumpsuit"? anyway, cant find the name of it. And probably wont be a nice design for on a earthly suit. Keep us updated if this thing develops Devin 😀 I probably shouldn't be on any team or whatever but im for McClain, she cool.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 8:01 am
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    First crime in space was when astronauts seized a space station (Skylab) for a day.

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  • September 23, 2019 at 8:58 am
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    3:24 wat? 1984?!!?? MIR hadn't even launched yet.. the ISS launched 15 years later.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 9:46 am
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    Objection! You stole that tagline from an episode of Be Cool Scooby-Doo. Fred Jones parked the Mystery Machine on a shuttle craft headed towards the space station. (This series is really strange. ) It's what he said the whole show for drama.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 9:51 am
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    space pirates will be a bicth to handle one day given that it would be a lot harder to track them down and blow up there home base area and given that space ships will become like micro eco system they can do a hit and run take what they what and live in deep space for just a few years and come back to sell what ever they stole

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 12:02 pm
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    Objection! This identity theft wasn't intergalactic, it was intragalactic!

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 12:08 pm
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    Objection:
    Yuri Gagarin was a Soviet air force officer, not a Russian one
    ISS was launched in 1998, not in 1984

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  • September 23, 2019 at 12:32 pm
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    Got aims to be the first Space Lawyer?

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 12:36 pm
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    For a crime to be "intergallatic" it would have to be commited outside the Milkyway, not just in space.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 12:38 pm
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    my southern ass still can't get over how a lot of people including James pronounce lawyer as 'loyer'

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 12:47 pm
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    Can you review the movie Philadelphia?

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 1:00 pm
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    Ok, you just performed my new favorite indochino transition!

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 1:12 pm
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    Article 51…Area 51…May The First Be With You. (5/1)

    I'm starting to think there's a weird connection between that number and space 😂

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 1:16 pm
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    i didnt like this video

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 1:49 pm
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    I use to serve in the army there they basically dumbed down jurisdiction for a member of the military (which is NASA) jurisdiction is where ever you plant your feet or in this case float

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  • September 23, 2019 at 2:45 pm
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    03:37 owh how fun my country is labeled second next to u.s.a awesome 🙂 (maybe because we have the bron and yall have the money XD) but if a american aboard the space station uses the internet to steal money it would seem to me that the juresdiction wil fully go to america , if a person of another nationality who resides on the space station would have done this "what ever nationality he/she might be" (seems to me) that then the country of that nationality in question must abide to the laws that were set and needs to arrange propper actions accordingly. also space and sea laws are not the same you cant compare the two with one and other.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 3:07 pm
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    Can you do more ace attorney episodes?

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 3:16 pm
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    Good info to know.

    “Hey honey, let’s take a holiday in Antarctica. Your life insurance is up to date, right?”

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 3:32 pm
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    I would say no can you push a coup on the moon.. no you can't government is all about enforcement to not own it forfits your rights to punishing it's citizens

    One solution to solve all NASA is forbidon from getting help from other nations

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 3:32 pm
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    The issue here is this is an "Internet" crime. These are prosecuted where the crime took place ie not where the person was but where the computer they improperly accessed was. This is why the US can charge Russian agents with hacking even though they never "entered" US jurisdiction. When you illegally access computer assets in the US you commit a crime on those computers and are thus subject to the jurisdiction where ever the computers are. So it's not really an issue of "space law" under US law she was for all intent and purposes in the same room as the computer when she improperly accessed it regardless of her actual physical location at the time.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 3:42 pm
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    I would love it so much if you'd lawyer Fractured from 2007.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 3:43 pm
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    "Crime…that's out of this world"
    YEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 3:45 pm
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    this wasnt the REAL first crime, infact the first crime was much worse, it wasnt solved though so its a unsolved case, a unfinished hole was found dug into the walls and protective layering inside the station at some point and the culprit was never found, it was classified as sabotage with intent of multiple murders.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 3:46 pm
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    "Title 51"… seriously?

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  • September 23, 2019 at 4:11 pm
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    Thank you for clearing up my ignorance. Here I was believing that all crimes on the high seas were calcified as piracy.

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  • September 23, 2019 at 4:46 pm
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    Actually, space lab (a station once in space) had 2 astronauts quit on it for a day which kinda means they held a very expensive space station for a day to take a break from not sleeping for a week for experiments, therefore they became the FIRST SPACE PIRATES, when they got back on the ground, they we scolded and got In trouble. 😐

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 4:56 pm
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    3:22
    "The international space station was placed into orbit in 1984…."
    Uh… no. The ISS was placed into orbit in 1998 which is why its COSPAR ID is 1998-067A. Much like MIR's COSPAR ID is 1986-017A because it was the 17th object launched into orbit in 1986.
    Just a moment after saying this you display the International Space Station Agreements commemorative plaque dated January 29th 1998.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 5:00 pm
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    could you do a mini review of the trial scene from the Red Dwarf Episode Justice?

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 5:44 pm
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    space is fake lmao watch a few nasa hoaxes your a lawyer you should be able to spot a liar

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 5:53 pm
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    I object! 1. The ISS was proposed in 1984, the first launch was in 1998, it was not mostly completed until 2011. 2. The Skylab mutiny in 1973 could be considered the first space crime, depending on the source and ferocity of the strike.

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  • September 23, 2019 at 6:53 pm
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    9:43 that pun should be a crime.

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  • September 23, 2019 at 9:35 pm
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    There are only two kinds of countries. Those that have never put a man on the moon… and America.

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  • September 23, 2019 at 9:43 pm
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    Your thumbnail is misleading, the first and only space criminal is a woman.

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  • September 23, 2019 at 10:25 pm
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    Objection where was the music when you put on the glasses and you should do a CSI episode sometime

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  • September 23, 2019 at 10:38 pm
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    Have you done a video on the sovereign citizen movement? I think it would be interesting to hear you take on these people and the "constitution" items they shout as they are being arrested.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 11:16 pm
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    Peaceful purposes refers to not used for war; has nothing to do with not committing crimes there.

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 11:42 pm
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    I need that John Wick look from Indochino

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 1:43 am
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    Why is the thumbnail a dude? That's sexist

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 3:06 am
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    You said space so many times, I started hearing it in Tim Curry's voice. (^o^)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1Sq1Nr58hM

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 3:56 am
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    Stellar presentation, counselor.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 4:06 am
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    Objection! Can't be no space crime, cause ain't no space to do no crime in outside the flat Earth, globehead.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 4:40 am
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    I've had this question in my mind for awhile and this seem like a good place to ask experts. I've been watching the amber guyger case and the question I've had in my mind is this. Since amber guyger has been fired by that Dallas police department, does the case laws Tennessee V. Garner and Graham V. Connor still stand as a defense in court or will she stand trial as a civilian? Thanks to anyone who answers.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 5:48 am
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    You should make a video discussing what would happen if one conjoined twin commits murder without the consent of the other. Lets say if the twins are similar to the famous conjoined twins who each have a head and share one body. They both control one half of the body seperate of the other. If one grabs a weapon and murders someone and the other has nothing to do with it, do they let the guilty party free or imprison an innocent person?

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 6:17 am
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    Space Force!

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  • September 24, 2019 at 6:30 am
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    US code title 51 🤔 Area 51!!

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  • September 24, 2019 at 6:33 am
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    feels like something from hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy

    It wasn't cloning
    It wasn't unlawful use of orbital weaponry
    it wasn't even an invasion later poured over in history if it was a just war.
    It was identity theft.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    Can you discuss the "Antivaccine movement"? I think this is a really important subject to talk about.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 8:05 am
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    Space crime. I have some space an had an impure thought once.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 8:08 am
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    Crime is crime. Makes no difference in space. I strangled her to death before the dead body uggggggghhhhhh stuff. So, then guilty or not guilty then if not sanity or whatever.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 8:10 am
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    Claustrophobia childhood of abuse psychosis from the Shuttle your honor. What? Yeah, he's innocent. Ok, you may go sir.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 8:11 am
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    Then of course if the guy strangles another girl and the Ugggggh body thing we re-examine the space shuttle claustrophobia diagnosis.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 8:14 am
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    Yes, even if "But I was having flashbacks."

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  • September 24, 2019 at 8:21 am
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    What about space crimes on the ground? Houston or whoever makes a faulty ground control sleeping gas, room lockdown thing?

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 8:30 am
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    Private vs Government space travel caused this. I'm too stupid to have seen this.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 8:31 am
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    Space Force I mean. Civilian Billionaires launching their own ships.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 8:32 am
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    I was like "why are we doing this? There are Russians and Chinese on board with ours? Oh, civilians right."

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 8:33 am
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    I even thought "Trump doesn't really care about space Aliens does he?"

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 10:40 am
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    What happens if you're a dual citizen who is in Antarctica and commits a crime?

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  • September 24, 2019 at 11:23 am
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    Objection: You cannot say codify as in Cape Cod, when the word is derived from code as in load?

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 12:56 pm
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    "it could also mean crime puts on shades that's out of this world"

    YYYEEEEEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 12:59 pm
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    I'm really glad you didn't talk about the "mutiny" in space.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 1:32 pm
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    OBJECTION! The 1959 Soviet Vostok station ice axe attack, which was likely fatal, was perpetrated BEFORE the 1959 Antarctic Treaty came into effect. This should have been discussed, as it is crimen in terra nullius, strikingly similar to the subject of your video.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 1:59 pm
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    If not even alien space pirates wanna visit us that tells ya something about us dun'it? I bet there's a whole laundry list of reasons.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 2:31 pm
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    My gut instinct is that the country that sent you to space has jurisdiction. So if you went to space on a U.S. vessel, you'd be tried in a U.S. court.
    Edit: I was right.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 2:46 pm
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    I like the newer intro wipe! (If you want full nerd cred you might want to use the bald eagle call vs red-tailed hawk… despite the bald eagle not sounding nearly as fierce… though almost everyone uses the incorrect call so more people associate it with a bald eagle… it is akin to a shared psychosis)

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 2:56 pm
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    Please cover the UK supreme court prorogation verdict

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 3:21 pm
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    They're space TRAVELERS, therefore are not subject to your law.

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 3:45 pm
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    This guys should have PewDiePie subscriber numbers.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 5:10 pm
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    In the grim darkness of the far future, there are only space lawyers.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 6:10 pm
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    I mean IF this is true that's kind of a standard bad marrage movie and she should get in trouble but the first space criminal being a lesbian space criminal is pretty based. Lesbian criminals in space sounds like a good TV show.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 6:37 pm
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    OBJECTION! *an_t_arctic

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  • September 24, 2019 at 6:56 pm
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    Space Pirates could be a real threat. Imagine the galaxies like the Wild West of America. Space Pirates could be wanted in one galaxy, only to flee to another galaxy because of potential jurisdiction issues preventing the first galaxy from pursuing the Pirates.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    How should criminals on Mars be judged? Normal court system? Or Trial by Combat?

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  • September 24, 2019 at 9:13 pm
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    Now that were on the subject of maritime law, what were the legal implications of the trial of captain hook?

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  • September 24, 2019 at 9:47 pm
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    Dude. Are you kicking your feet? You look like you have to go to the bathroom. Lol.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 10:03 pm
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    I am so getting one of those suits for when I'm working out on the farm.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 10:34 pm
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    9:50, look a space suit is an actual suit, ok? Nothing beats a space suit when it comes to being a suit.

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  • September 24, 2019 at 10:43 pm
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    Objection: in your video at around 8:24 you state that in Civil law countries judges simply follow the law and they never have discretion to create Common Law on their own. This is quite an oversimplification. From an outside perspective I can see how this appears to be the case but as opposed to Common Law systems where the discretion of a judge is limited by an act, i.e. the common law is overruled by Parliament, interpretation of an act is both accepted and encouraged in Civil Law systems. Codified laws in Civil Law countries are generally far less specific in their wording and purpose and leave the Judges to interpret and expand the Law and the requirements. Furthermore case law is, notwithstanding the importance of the codified laws themselves, very important because of the necessity of interpretation. Just like in Common Law systems Case law is studied, followed and applied daily in Civil Law countries, I find all but the outset is different.

    In fact in many cases lawmakers generally rely on judges interpreting and defining the boundaries of almost every subject. Therefore judges are given great amounts of discretion to define and interpret. As an example one could simply think of the notion of good faith. All the law says is that one can claim for a contract to be amended based on good faith. It is up for the judge to decide whether or not to rule that the contract should be changed and to rule in what way it should be amended. Neither of these things are defined in law, in other words it is up to his/her own discretion. So as a matter of fact judges do make law.

    There have also been many examples of judges expanding on the law, for instance by expanding the definition of a tort. A well known example was the strict interpretation of unlawfulness, one of the requirements to be proven by a plaintiff if he wanted to successfully claim damages under a tort. The article in question defined unlawfulness as either A or B, yet the courts ruled that despite this codified definition, C should also be defined as unlawful. This has later been codified as well but for over many decades this sort of argument was solely based on case law. One might not call it common law, but it is case law nonetheless and its merit is without question. Judges do make law, if they were but the mouthpiece of the law why would we have them?

    Love your videos by the way

    Peter

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  • September 24, 2019 at 11:11 pm
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    Diplomatic Immunity, Revoked!

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  • September 24, 2019 at 11:17 pm
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    I'll make my own boat, not register it, and start my own nation so I can diplomatic immunity in the high seas

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  • September 24, 2019 at 11:38 pm
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    Talk about out of your jurisdiction…

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  • September 25, 2019 at 2:06 am
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    Objection: You referred to the crimes committed on the ISS as "intergalactic crime" or "interstellar crime" when in fact neither is true, since the crimes are both in our galaxy and in our solar system. The nearest correct term is "interplanetary crime," as would be the applicable law.

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  • September 25, 2019 at 2:10 am
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    Great YT channel keep up the great vids, you make the law extra interesting, your vids should be shown in High Schools and Colleges in Legal Studies etc. And as for Space law in UNITED STATES SPACE FORCE 1980, U.S law is the only law above Earth and on other worlds. GO SPACE FORCE! Hope you guys check out a copy, keep up the great work. Hope you'll cover the law in new movies and tv shows now coming out and video games etc as well. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5sXyf-2BBA

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  • September 25, 2019 at 2:57 am
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    Why did you show a dude in your thumbnail as the space pirate when obviously it was a woman?

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  • September 25, 2019 at 3:38 am
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    The Eagle has landed! It had to be said alright!

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  • September 25, 2019 at 5:07 am
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    the space jail was shown in Guardians Of The Galaxy

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