Sydney Kramer: Joe, LA is
known for having some of the best ramen in the US. Joe: That’s what I’ve heard. Sydney: We’re gonna try it
all. We’re gonna try tonkatsu. Joe: No idea. Sydney: We’re gonna try tsukemen. Joe: Never heard of it. Sydney: We’re gonna try shio. Joe: Sure.
Sydney: Let’s do it. Joe Let’s do it. Sydney: Since Joe and I are
somewhat new to Los Angeles, we called in a ringer. Meet Mark Hoshi. He’s a former ramen chef
and runs Ramen Culture. His mission is to help people understand more about the ramen industry as a whole. Joe: We talked to Mark and combed through the usual suspects, like Eater, Yelp, and Instagram, to find the absolute best ramen in LA. Sydney: There are endless
varieties of ramen, and we wanted to showcase
the wide swath of options available in our fair city. Despite the difference
in broth and noodles, we’re looking for a few key factors, which Mark helped break down for us. Mark Hoshi: So, to make a bowl of ramen, you need five elements, five components. Number one: the noodles. Number two: the soup. Number three: the soup base. Number four: the topping. And number five: the aroma oil. Ramen has always been innovative. So, if you live in Tokyo, or if you live in the
northern part in Hokkaido or southern part in Kishu, they all have their own version of ramen. The reason why is they get different ingredients
in different regions. Ramen doesn’t have to
be this way or that way. I feel like it’s your bowl. Joe: Our first stop is Daikokuya, which has been an LA staple since 2002. Sydney: It’s known for its rich, pork-based tonkatsu ramen, and there have been lines
out the door since it opened. Mark: Daikokuya has been
around before the ramen craze. So, people who lived near Tokyo or people like me who’s Japanese, when you wanted quality ramen, it was usually Daikokuya. Customer: I love this
place. The ramen, amazing. Like, it’s one of the best
places I’ve been ever been to, for sure, like, and I
eat a lot of ramen, so. Sydney: The tonkatsu broth is
made with actual pork bones for maximum porky flavor, and it simmers all night long. Joe: Then, for the
signature Daikoku ramen, they start with shoyu, or soy base, and add the tonkatsu broth. Sydney: The bowl is
finished with char siu pork, bean sprouts, scallions,
bamboo shoots, an egg, and sesame seeds. Joe: This looks incredible. Sydney: It smells like pork fat. Joe: It smells perfect. Allow me to embarrass
myself by trying to do this the way it’s supposed to. Sydney: I like to do it, like,
put a little broth in here. And then I like to put a little
noodle, like, in my spoon. That’s, like, my favorite
way to eat ramen. I know that some people like to slurp, people like to do a lot of other things. This is what I like to do because I just feel like you get, like, soup and noodle in the same bite. Joe: OK, I’m gonna do it this way. Sydney: Oh, yeah. Joe: Wow. Sydney: It’s really fatty, really rich. Joe: That broth. Oh, that broth is amazing. Sydney: But like, low-key, I’m gonna add a little
bit more garlic into mine. Because I like it to be stinky. Joe: The noodle just with the broth. Absolutely incredible flavor, right? And then the second it hits
your lips, you’re like, yup, I can see why
everyone’s standing in line and wants this, you know? Sydney: The noodles
are perfectly al dente. They’re nice and chewy, and I like that they’re, like, a little curly, so they, like,
pick up on all the broth. Joe: I’ve been eyeing
this pork for a while. Just saw my guy slicing it back there. Look at that, look at that
perfect piece of pork. Which camera, one? Camera two? Camera? Look at that pork. Sydney: What’s the pork taste
like? I’m about to go in. You explain while I eat. Joe: This is pork perfection. It’s a bit of a fatty cut, but because it’s been simmering
so long in this broth, it melts in your mouth. Wow. Sydney: If you’re a ramen newbie, I don’t know where you’ve been, but this is a really good place to start. Oh, PS, they also marinate
this egg in pork fat, so I’m sure it’s gonna
be really delicious. Oh, man. Do you see how it’s jiggling? Joe: Yeah. Sydney: I think that means
that there’s a runny yolk in there, guys. Joe: The anticipation’s killing me. I’m just floored by this ramen. I mean, I went to Japan and
had lots of ramen there, but this one is like, oh, wow. Sydney: This is like the bog standard for ramen in Los Angeles, and it’s a lot to live up to. Sydney: Our next stop in
this ramen journey is Okiboru in Chinatown. It was listed as one of
the Michelin Bib Gourmand restaurants for 2019, notably for its tsukemen-style ramen. Joe: And I’m notable for
not knowing what that is, but I’m excited to find out. Sean Park: Tsukemen is
actually dipping ramen. So, noodles are served on the side, and they are cold, and you dip it into a hot
broth and eat it that way. It was invented in 1961, actually, by a man called Kazuo Yamagishi. Mark: In Japan, basically,
we have soba noodles. And what they would do in the summer is cool down the soba, buckwheat noodles, and dip it in dashi soup base. And they would slurp it up. So, he made the ramen version of that dish and called it tsukemen. Sean: We wanted to make our own noodles ’cause we wanted to
match it with the broth. Because, you know, after testing so many
different types of noodles, we realized that for the
broth we were making, we wanted a particular flavor. So, we wanna be able to
be able to control that. Instead of just purchasing them. It is a lot more work, but at
the end of the day, you know, I think you’ll notice the
difference between fresh noodles and something that was purchased. Customer: Their noodles are exactly how I like them, like, al dente. It has, like, that bounce, that chew. I’m here at least once a week. Like, this week, I’m here. I was here Tuesday,
and now I’m here again. Sydney: Tsukemen soup is more concentrated than other types of ramen. It can take Okiboru two full days to cook and reduce its soup. Joe: And the soup we’re eating today is made with what exactly? Sydney: We’re eating the pork-based broth with seafood today. But you can get chicken or veggie too. Joe: And what exactly is happening here? Sydney: The broth has cooled, and since it’s reduced so
much, all the fat congeals. It gets heated to order and
mixed with the ramen base. Sean: All right, I’m gonna
show you guys how to eat this. Sydney: Great, I need help. Sean: So, first, the lime is actually for the noodles. So, you’re just gonna
squeeze the juice on there. Sydney: OK. Joe: OK. Sean: The broth is rich, so the lime juice helps
balance it out a little bit. Sydney: OK, cool. Sean: And then you’re gonna
take some of these noodles. Sydney: This is gonna be a test for us. Joe: I’m the worst with the sticks, man. I’m the worse with the sticks. Sean: If you need forks, just let me know. Sydney: Oh, God. So, like, what’s the
right amount of noodles to pick up, do you think? Sean: You know, for me, I like to just do, like,
two, three bites at a time. Because if you put too much, it’s gonna cool down the broth too fast. This gets a little messy but, with tsukemen ramen, slurping is a part of it. Sydney: Really? Sean: The louder you’re slurping in Japan, the more you’re enjoying your meal. (slurping) Sydney: The people love it. All right. Ready, Joe? Joe: Yeah, let’s do this. (slurping) Sydney: Wow. Sean: What do you think? Sydney: That is flavorful. That really packs a punch. Joe: This is the first time
I’ve had a dipping ramen. And I already have noticed that with the broth being kind of, like, stuck to the noodles ’cause
it’s so much more condensed, you get way more flavor. Sean: Yes, yes, exactly. Joe: Because usually when
I eat ramen, you know, it’s almost like a bowl of soup. And, I could be doing it wrong, but I’m just, like,
doing one of these things and trying to lap it in there. The pork in the broth. Sydney: Oh, I’ve already eaten it. Joe: Oh, my goodness. (slurping) Sydney: I’m bad at slurping. Sean: It takes practice. Sydney: Does it really? I mean, clearly. Sydney: So, this was quite the different ramen experience, I think. Joe: I think so, I’ve not had this style of ramen before, and I absolutely loved it. Joe: Now it’s time to
drive to the west side and hit up Santouka Ramen. Sydney: It’s another LA favorite that’s located inside Japanese
grocery chain Mitsuwa. The signature salt ramen
comes with cha siu pork, mushrooms, bamboo shoots, scallions, narutomaki, and a salted plum. Mark: One thing I appreciate
about Santouka is, when I go to New York, or New Jersey, or Boston, or here in LA, they have multiple locations, but their flavor doesn’t
fluctuate, so it’s consistent. That’s what I really respect about them. Joe: So, I’m dumb. Is this
actual food or is this fake? Sydney: This is fake!
Joe: Yeah, OK. They did, we did the video
about who makes this, right? Sydney: Yes, we did. But it’s really funny that
you would think this is real. So, you have to wait until
your number is called, and they just called our number. Joe: Don’t stand up there and clog it up. Sydney: Get my ramen. Joe: I’ll hang out here. Sydney: That’s for you.
Joe: Thanks. Sydney: That’s right. That’s for you. Joe: Thank you. Stop it. You’re acting like my mom. Here’s yours, this is mine. All right, I get it. I understand. Wow. Sydney: I like that a lot. Joe: Oh, I love it, and, you know, it’s not too salty. Sydney: The really, like, nutty flavor I’m getting from the sesame is interesting and really delicious, and a nice break from, like, the really, really heavy, fatty broths, I think, that we’ve tried so far. Let’s try this pork.
Joe: Whoa. Sydney: The pork’s good? Joe: The pork is fantastic. Wow. Sydney: You know when you
get, like, an Italian sub with, like, broccolini
and stuff on a nice roll? Joe: I wouldn’t get that, but yeah, I understand what you mean. Sydney: First of all, it’s delicious. You should absolutely try that. Second of all, this is
what it reminds me of. Like, a nice, like, Italian roast pork. (slurping) The noodles are chewy, perfectly cooked, absolutely delicious. It’s a nostalgic kind of ramen, I think. It’s definitely…this
is the kind of ramen that I remember trying, like,
for the first time ever. Joe: The noodle consistency,
like, these really thin ones, almost like the instant
ramen you would get. By the way, instant ramen
is the absolute best. I love it. So, that’s not a dig on
noodles or instant ramen. Sydney: It’s not at all. Joe: What I like about this one is everything is really
coming together perfectly. Just creating this experience where you get a little bit of everything. Sydney: We saved the most
gut-busting ramen for last with Tsujita Annex. Joe: They serve Jiro-style ramen here, which can sometimes have up
to 1,600 calories per bowl. Yikes! Mark: The style is basically
known for their thick noodles and also their rich, fatty
pork broth with shoyu base. And it has bean sprouts
and cabbages as a topping. After I eat a bowl of Jiro, it’s like a bad hangover. It’s good, you’re having a good time eating. It’s amazing, but then you realize you ate too much. Customer: The acid’s right, the garlic’s right, yeah. I mean, you smell for a
little bit afterwards, but it’s worth it. Terumi Tokita: I think garlic
and fat makes the best broth, and people love it. I wouldn’t say there’s a
right way to eat ramen. Sydney: Tsujita Annex and
Jiro-style ramen as a whole is known for adding extra
pork fat to the broth. Joe: It’s so fatty, you can pick up pieces
of fat with chopsticks. Sydney: So, we have ourselves
some Jiro-style ramen. It’s got extra back fat on the top. Joe: Extra back fat, please. Sydney: Yup. It’s really, really rich. It’s not, I don’t think, advisable to eat a whole bowl by yourself. But I see some brave souls around here that are kind of going for it. Joe: There was a sign that said
each of you have to get one, so I think people were getting used to just splitting one. They’re like, nah-ah-ah-ah-ah. Sydney: It’s rich. This is the richest ramen
we’ll have on this adventure. Joe: Wow. Sydney: There is something
extra special in here aside from all the fat. I’m not quite sure what
it is, but it’s delicious. Joe: The pork, as thick as it is, melts in your mouth. It just falls apart the
second you bite into it. Sydney: All right, I’m gonna go for it. Joe: It is so juicy and soft. Right? Sydney: Oh, my God. Joe: This is sensational. Sydney: The pork itself
is incredibly flavorful, and a little sweet on the outside, too. Joe: The noodles, they go
up, like, lightning fast ’cause they’re just dripping with fat. (slurping) I was a bit, to be honest, visually, I was like,
oh, no, thick noodles? Sydney: These are awesome. Joe: But these are
actually pretty incredible. Sydney: All in all, like,
for as heavy as this is, it’s delicious. It’s rich,
it’s fatty, it’s greasy. It’s almost like the junk food of ramen. Joe: You think so? Sydney: Yeah, absolutely. And now, it’s finally time to choose the best of the best. All right, so we’ve eaten a lot of ramen. Joe: A lot of ramen. Sydney: Four kinds of ramen. Joe: Four great kinds of ramen. Sydney: And now, we’re picking the winner, the best ramen in LA. Joe: Let’s do it. I’m gonna look at my phone ’cause I don’t wanna spell it wrong. Syd, life’s about hard choices. I’m gonna have to make an
incredibly hard choice. Which of the four were the best of the best in Los Angeles? Sydney: I felt like it
was an easy choice for me. Joe: OK, I did not. Sydney: Really?
Joe: I was down… there was three that I was like, that on any day could be the best one. I had to really think about it. Sydney: All right, ready? Joe: Ready! One! Both: Two, three! Joe: Ah! Sydney: I knew you were gonna pick that. Joe: Why’d you know? Sydney: You have better
handwriting than me, I will say. Joe: Thank you, thank you. Sydney: All right, so. We’ve gotta break this down. There can only be one. Joe: There can only be one. Sydney: The reason I’m picking Okiboru is those handmade noodles, man. They were so good. Joe: Yeah. Sydney: I love that you could
add lime to the noodles. I loved that citrus element
to, like, the rich soup. Joe: I don’t even remember that. (laughs) Yeah sure, that was nice. Sydney: Yeah? And I really just, you know, I loved dipping the noodles
in the broth and, like, getting a good amount of
everything in one bite. As opposed to trying to,
like, you know, figure out how to get, like, soup and
noodle in the same bite. Joe: Points off for that
place for the exact thing, that dipping. I know that’s the style, but for me, this was, first of all, a classic ramen bowl. And also, I mean, hey, man, the whole thing was super fatty, and that makes it taste really good. The second we tasted it, I was like, oh, man, I know this probably
isn’t the best for me, but this flavor is incredible. Just something about it just
cranked it up to 11 for me. And every bite with the
broth, the meat, the noodles, everything was just
soaked in this rich fat that I just couldn’t get enough of. Sydney: We have to decide on one winner. Joe: Yeah, OK. Sydney: And the reason
that I’m going to go ahead and agree with you and pick Tsujita is because it was my second favorite. Joe: Mm-hmm. Sydney: And it is
really, really delicious. And Okiboru is tsukemen, which people could potentially
argue is not, like, a traditional ramen. Joe: Fair enough. Sydney: And Jiro-style is not as well known as it should be and absolutely delicious. So, we can go ahead and declare Tsujita the winner.
Joe: Yeah! You hear that, Tsujita? When I come in, I want a table right away, I’m not waiting. I just hooked you guys up. Sydney: All right, well, until next time. Let us know what we missed. There’s a lot of ramen in LA, and we just scratched the surface. Joe: That’s right. Sydney: So, until next time.

The Best Ramen In LA | Best Of The Best
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100 thoughts on “The Best Ramen In LA | Best Of The Best

  • August 24, 2019 at 4:13 pm
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    i gained hella weight and FOOD INSIDER is responsible! how about sponsoring a gym?

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:13 pm
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    Tasty

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:14 pm
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    yummmmmmmmmmmm noooooooodalssssssssssss/udan/Ramen Im half Japanese to!

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:16 pm
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    Who’s hungry

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:18 pm
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    4:39*? Are you serious? It tastes like Pork you dumbass!

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  • August 24, 2019 at 4:19 pm
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    Yummy

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:19 pm
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    I've got a real soft spot for Sydney, she's wonderful to watch and listen to.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:20 pm
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    The most pathetic attempt on eating ramen.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:20 pm
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    Ramen so good

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:22 pm
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    I like this one place called shin sen gumi

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:25 pm
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    Are these 2 trannies? He seems like he used to be a girl and she seems like she used to be a guy. Inquiring minds want to know. Go to 14:26 and on. You be the judge. Thanks

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:26 pm
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    very nice video thanks for sharing !

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:28 pm
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    Ramen is πŸ’™

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:32 pm
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    why no prices for the dishes???

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:34 pm
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    When food insider asked what should they do next on there best of the best series and your comment was granted hehe who's the happy kid now πŸ™‹πŸ»β€β™‚οΈπŸ™‹πŸ»β€β™‚οΈπŸ™‹πŸ»β€β™‚οΈ

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:34 pm
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    Don't think it's appropriate to get two Caucasians to review Japanese noodles dishes. Their palate is so different.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:35 pm
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    Haven't been to these places, but Tatsu ramen on Melrose my favorite.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:35 pm
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    Hi Joe. @ 3:50 … it is considered unethical to stick your chopsticks in your food. Also, if one would be superstitious, it resembles incense lighted during funerals in the East. A social faux pas. Just saying.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:37 pm
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    Do a comparative episode between Japanese Ramen and Korean Ramyun.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:39 pm
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    I need it. I need it. I don’t want it. I need it

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:40 pm
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    IF THIS MAKES YOU HUNGRY 🀀…….

    SMASH THIS AND MAKE IT BLUE
    πŸ‘‡πŸ˜ƒ

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:47 pm
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    You always upload when I'm about to sleep … now I feel hungry again

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:53 pm
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    I live in So Cal and went to Japan for vacation, the ramen in LA is the closest I've tasted to Japanese Ramen. It costs 4x the amount in LA though =(.

    TATSU Ramen is amazing

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:56 pm
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    I miss my ramen dose so much, but I'm on ketogenic diet. 😒😒😒

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  • August 24, 2019 at 4:57 pm
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    Thanks insider now I want ramen.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 4:59 pm
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    About to go to 3 different ramen spots today, that’s how much I love ramen!!!!

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:00 pm
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    I love ramen and in LA and we have many gems. I don’t really eat meat anymore, let alone pork, but let’s face it, tonkontsu ramen reigns supreme and I have yet to find a vegan ramen that can compare to those flavors. Vegan ramen is good, but I’m very well aware that I’m eating diet ramen. 😞

    If I may, for those who have not yet experienced ramen (where have you been?) I strongly recommend Shin-Sen-Gumi Hakata Ramen. It’s great for beginners and still very flavorful/customizable ramen. Hokkaido Ramen Santouka, Ko Ryu, and Daikokuya are other favorites of mine.

    Next do Pho!

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:01 pm
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    love how he asks for special seating at the end, ahahha. good promotion deserves a quick seat for sure

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:03 pm
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    I choose the first one! Dietcokea or whatever they called it makes it the best I think.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:06 pm
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    idc what is best just give me instant ramen

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:06 pm
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    I am eating Ramen while watching this

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:07 pm
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    TSUJITA ANNEX ALL THE WAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:07 pm
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    You should also check out Ramen Tatsunoya in Pasadena and Silver Lake.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:19 pm
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    Bing babing bang babing pang pong babing babapong,nice music

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:30 pm
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    the slurping to show appreciation, or show that you are enjoying the food is actually a myth, the real purpose is that when you eat the noodles, people dont waste their time chit chatting in japan and let the noodles get soggy, or they require people to eat and leave fast because of the restaurants being small and need people to eat and leave fast, so slurping is just to help with the heat of the noodles, since its very hot when served. You can slurp if you want to, but doing it very loudly and thinking that it will make the chef happy, isnt actually the case πŸ™‚

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:31 pm
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    Ψ¬ΨΉΨͺ😍🀣😘😍

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:32 pm
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    Surprised they didn't try the tsukemen at Tsujita, that's one of the things they're known for. Glad it won out regardless.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:36 pm
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    Who loves troom trooms new channel who hoo

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:37 pm
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    Dipping ramen needs to be in its own list. It’s not the same

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:39 pm
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    I'm seeing this in midnight..

    RIP me

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:43 pm
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    BoohooπŸ‘Ž

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:44 pm
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    Tonkotsu = Pork Bone Broth, Tonkatsu = Pork Cutlet…..

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:47 pm
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    Bye Joe. Stay for now Sydney. Slurping is mandatory.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:54 pm
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    Santoka ramen is the best.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:57 pm
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    I am hungry 🀀🀀🀀🀀

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 5:58 pm
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    Wait… where's the other woman? Henn… i can't remember her name! Hermione? dang it. Hennanine? whatever. I swear I've her with this woman! I give up… lol I'm just gonna go heat up my Cup O' Noodles now since that's all that's quick right now. lol. I'd like to try ramen that isn't deep fried, then freeze dried, then packaged in a plastic wrapping or a polystyrene foam cup for once… lol!

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:07 pm
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    Content brought me here.
    The hosts sent me back!

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:07 pm
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    I think we can all agree that ramen is insanely overhyped and isn't as great as people make it sound.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:10 pm
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    I love "the best" series
    Please keep them coming

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:17 pm
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    Why does their spelling of ramen sound like 'wamen'?

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:18 pm
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    I wanna try authentic ramen πŸ™ but instant is fine

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:21 pm
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    I WANT SOME OF THAT YUMMYNESS!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:34 pm
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    Those glasses are too big for her face

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:41 pm
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    πŸ› note πŸ“ stabbing chopsticks πŸ₯’ into ramen 🍜 is a no no. Asianffonerd (IG)

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:42 pm
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    Me to ramen: "Get over here! I’m gonna eat ya! I’m bigger than you. I’m higher on the food chain. Get IN MA BELLY!"

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:45 pm
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    You're eating it wrong…you have to slurp. It enhances the flavor of broth and noodles .. you're butchering the experience.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 6:59 pm
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    Gotta go with the OG Daikokuya. Side of their coleslaw with house dressing is the shit

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 7:03 pm
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    A small FYI, he's not saying Kishu, he's saying Kyushu. Kyushu is known for tonkotsu ramen (as it is supposedly originating from there)

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 7:10 pm
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    This video is alright, all y’all ate was tonkotsu, so technically you pick the best tonkotsu ramen not ramen

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 7:13 pm
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    The location of Kishu is wrong…

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 7:26 pm
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    As a Japanese American this is totally cultural appropriation!! Why don't you white people stay to your hamburgers!!

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 7:31 pm
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    love the LA stuff. Can you do Sacramento and San Fransico next?

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 7:45 pm
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    I went to daikokuya the week after i came back from japan. I was always curious about why there was always a long line. Friends and I finally decided to go. The pork does literally melt in your mouth. the ramen itself though, I felt something was missing. Maybe it was an off day or I had some really high expectations but the ramen isn't as great as it seems like everyone is saying. Friends and I also got the gyoza and takoyaki those were also delicious. Maybe I will go back and try the ramen again.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 7:53 pm
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    Mitsuwa hires illegal aliens

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 8:07 pm
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    laughs in cup noodles

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 8:12 pm
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    Naruto is QUAKING

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 8:36 pm
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    Maurchan has left the chat

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 8:45 pm
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    Great vidπŸœπŸ‘

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 8:51 pm
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    I doubt those 2 believe in God

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  • August 24, 2019 at 8:57 pm
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    This video is fake… wheres Naruto?

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 9:00 pm
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    This one's awesome actually…πŸ’ŸπŸ’ŸπŸ˜šπŸ’Ÿ

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  • August 24, 2019 at 9:03 pm
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    Joe doesnt fit for these videos

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  • August 24, 2019 at 9:12 pm
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    Ichiran is a god….

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  • August 24, 2019 at 9:18 pm
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    He looks like he's struggling with them chopsticks.

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  • August 24, 2019 at 10:14 pm
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    Egg in ramen is barbaric

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  • August 24, 2019 at 10:15 pm
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    μ™€μš°~ λ§›λ‚˜κ² μ–΄μš”νƒ±κΈ€νƒ±κΈ€ λ©΄λΉ¨ πŸ‡°πŸ‡·πŸ‡°πŸ‡·πŸ‡°πŸ‡·πŸ‡°πŸ‡·πŸ‡°πŸ‡·πŸ‡°πŸ‡·πŸ‡°πŸ‡·β€πŸ’‹πŸ™‹β€β™€οΈπŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 10:23 pm
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    All of these maybe good

    But it’ll never beat insta ramen

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 10:44 pm
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    She's so hot…. πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 10:48 pm
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    (Mouthwatering.)

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 11:04 pm
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    Ramen is edible but you guys need to try the Vietnamese soup and dry noodles at Ghien Mi Go in Orange County. It's delicious with crispy pork fat. Divine! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 11:04 pm
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    I've been craving ramen for almost two months now and this vid is pushing me to my limits!

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 11:19 pm
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    Nope, okiboru was definitely not good. Only tasted like salt. Tsujita, daikokuya, and silver lake ramen (which didn't make the list but should have) are all way better, and it's not even close

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  • August 24, 2019 at 11:49 pm
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    Pull up to slurpin ramen in city if industry guaranteed the best place in L.A πŸ’―

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  • August 24, 2019 at 11:51 pm
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    Here's what I don't get. If you're new to the L.A. ramen scene, what gives you cred to judge what is the "Best of the Best" ramen in L.A.? You got your recs from ONE Asian instagrammer and some Yelp reviews. That doesn't qualify. You ignored most of the East of L.A., including Glendale and Pasadena. You have no right to judge the best of the best. Go back to Go and do not collect $200. I don't even want to give you more recs because your girl doesn't even know how to slurp.

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 11:58 pm
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    So I know that bowl of ramen costs at least $25 in LA (and a sub-par to more likely a terrible quality (made by some nobody japanese, chinese, or vietnamese boys in the kitchen without skills or proper training who work at ramen shops just because they can't get any office jobs in America)), whereas in japan the same-looking ramen would be like $6 (and necessarily an excellent quality or they wouldn't stay in business). I'll pass. At least the ones on the video look good visually though.

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 12:43 am
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    Why is the good ramen In LA

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  • August 25, 2019 at 12:45 am
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    Good food good president vote for Trump

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 1:24 am
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    I watched through all the adds without skipping them, you’re welcome :))

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  • August 25, 2019 at 1:36 am
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    I want to see a ramen episode but in New York with Herron

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  • August 25, 2019 at 1:45 am
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    2:50
    All tonkutsu broth is made with pork bones
    What do you expect??πŸ€¦β€β™‚οΈπŸ€¦β€β™‚οΈ

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 2:07 am
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    I needed this episode cuz I couldn't find much good ramen in LA.

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 4:01 am
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    Why u eat NARUTO!!

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  • August 25, 2019 at 4:28 am
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    Thank you πŸ‘πŸ‘

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 4:39 am
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    동넀 일식 λΌλ©˜μ§‘μ΄λΌλ„ κ°€μ•Όκ² λ‹€

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 5:03 am
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    Wow😍

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 6:03 am
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    How is it a tonkatsu broth ???? Katsu is deep fried bread crumb crusted something, generally pork called tonkatsu but is not a broth

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 6:03 am
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    "The louder you Slurp in Japan, the more you're enjoying your meal". Now I got an excuse to Slurp hella loud πŸ˜‚

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 6:06 am
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    The slurping part, alone, made me like this video.

    In my opinion, my pick would be Okiboru because of it combination of great ingredients, interactive meals, and the nostalgia of the restaurant.

    Tsujita looks good, too, but there IS such a thing as TOO MUCH FAT. I know this from experience as I cook homemade pho. When my pho has too much fat from the chicken or cow, the dish not only become too heavy but the flavors or the broth gets muddled up to the point where I couldn’t taste the coriander, ginger, and the protein, itself. Even though they said the garlic flavor comes through, just hearing that, alone, makes me think the ramen dish is mostly consists of pork fat and garlic, with the other flavors not being too prevalent. That’s why I wouldn’t pick Tsujita as a winner, just my take.

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 6:33 am
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    Sydney has nice thick eyebrows….

    Reply
  • August 25, 2019 at 6:59 am
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    Sigh* why do ppl insist on calling fresh noodles cooked β€œ al dente β€œ? Fresh noodles, or pasta is impossible to cook al dente; speaking from 20+ years in restaurants as a chef and cook

    Reply

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