is there anywhere else that you could want to be in minus 30 then and the boreal forest I don't think so it's awesome and I cannot feel my mouth tastes cold outside Wow we just had a major snowstorm today it's crazy tons of fresh snow which is good and then skies kind of cleared and the wind is just crazy on the lake winds picked up I'll but with that wind chill I mean it feels like it's minus 40 and then you start doing 50 mile an hour down the lake and oh what is that like – a thousand like I don't know what the heck that would be but it is cold so I just snuck into the lis here of this island you're gonna stop for a break and have a little discussion first hydration just a little quick sidenote for those of you that have water bottles and you're out in the winter and they freeze this little cozy here made by Outdoor Research perfect for knowledge in bottles even in minus 30 I'll get like six hours before anything in here it'll freeze if I put hot water into it to begin with that's a good thing because you can't drink frozen water you don't realize you know you're using all your muscles and you're all tensing up as you're riding once you start man oh things get cold quickly I need to put on my my toque so while I am stopped here in the lis of this island just getting out of the wind I figured I would talk about what's in this pack right here this is the ultimate safety system for me when I'm out in the boreal forest on a snowmobile this is just my dedicated snowmobile pack everything that's in here is designed to work with my snowmobile the style of trips that I'm doing with my snowmobile and this here will keep me going for a couple days should I break down or have an issue or get injured I have everything between what's in here what's on the snowmobile itself to to get me through until I can get myself to some help or until some help gets to me so I should start also by saying that that this video is not for everybody everyone kind of fine Tunes their own system to make it work for them and that and they totally should I'm just relaying what what works best for me in this environment so we're right on the border woodland caribou Park here it's like an endless wilderness I'm in a town of Red Lake Ontario that's a couple miles down this is the end of the road there is nobody else cell service I'm already like you know three miles from town cell service is gone there there's no help when you get out on this lake which is over 20 miles wide there is no help there's nobody out there so I have to work on a system that works for me to make sure that I'm safe and more importantly I'm comfortable you know if something breaks down you don't want to make it miserable for yourself so starting with the sled this is a skiddo expedition se 900 four-stroke engine straight gasps totally dependable comes with an integrated winch which sits right in here so if I ever get stuck in slush if I'm ever like just having issues roll the sled whatever I can literally plug this winch into its own wiring system underneath the seat I can throw the winch around a tree or whatever have you I can winch myself out of whatever situation I'm in I also have ice screws that if I'm ever really badly stuck in slush and I'm so far from shore that I need trees and I don't have any I can screw these things into the ice then I can attach the winch to that and pull myself out with that it's a really cool system really fortunate and it saved my butt a number of times so the sled itself is amazing it's also a wide track it has an adjustable suspension also the skis that are on this are a super wide floaty ski kind of helps me float a little more when I get into the really deep snow so most skis on snowmobiles are like like that these ones are like that so tons of flotation it it works out really well in terms of setting up the snowmobile right here I got my ox mate this here is a wetterling's 26 inch axe this is my I think it's like a two-pound head this is my bread-and-butter winter axe I love this thing look at that right in the pocket right into the clip and it's just a way I don't have to deal with anything totally out of the way right in the the well where I put my legs out of sight out of mind it's awesome this here is my gun boot it's secured just by a little pin sorry just pull that pin and oh see that guy's I just dropped it in the snow how am I gonna find that now don't drop stuff in the snow hey if I want to take this out remove the pin and you just pull it out this thing's made by Cole pin it's an awesome gun boot I've tried many different varieties of their gun boots and by far by far this is the best one when it comes to the gun itself right here I have a cotter pin it's gonna pull that this thing lifts up and away and then it's got to reach in here and I pull up my rifle now you can use a towel I have some tissue paper i stuff this boot solid so that the gun is never rattling around inside there's a scope on this gun I don't want things to rattle around that's just asking for trouble you can put your scope off we don't want that here's the gun this is a tikka t3 in stainless with a loop hold vx2 scope my favorite gun it's chambered in 243 Winchester stainless steel barrel I don't have to worry about it getting wet and then having it dry it off it's not gonna rust 243 Winchester and I use Hornady superformance bullets you might be asking why it is I carry a rifle with me everywhere I go out here you know this is the real deal wilderness there is nothing else out here and if I get stuck a lot of things can happen you know if I got into a really big jam I could use this to hunt for sustenance if I had to but more importantly you know like there are a lot of wolves in this area and even though I do hunt wolves and that's more for harvesting the fur to make stuff like this you know when you get if I was stuck out here for the night sometimes I've been on the lake and I've seen like packs twelve and fourteen wolves the last thing that I want is to be in that situation without a firearm do I think I'm ever in real danger with wolves in the winter not really they eat pretty well out here but I always say if you have a tool in the toolbox you can always reach for it if you need it so I just gives me peace of mind and at the end of the day if you look back through historical counts of people that travelled the wilderness and winter whether it's old books from the the 1920s and 30s and 40s and whenever everyone had a rifle with them it was a tool that they used on a regular basis that lives true today I would definitely never come out as far as I go without a rifle by my side with me everywhere I go it's just what I do okay moving on to this side of the sled here's a köppen chain saw a bracket this thing is indispensable it's attached to the frame bolted on here's the chainsaw bar and chain comes down through it it's also held on by a really strong bungee cord some people might ask why I carry a chainsaw and out here just like the rifle is a tool the chainsaw is also a really important tool we a lot of times we're going across the lake and there's narrows with unsafe ice so we have to take Overland trails that are pre-cut but sometimes trees are down cut those trees down quickly with a chainsaw instead of getting the big bow saw out and then you're working really hard you're working up a sweat then you jump back on the slide and head down the lake in minus 20 with 20 mile an hour wins he's gonna freeze you don't want to be sweating so chainsaw makes quick work of those down logs anytime you have a situation where there's a tree down chainsaw is the preferred tool out here also if I were to get stuck for the night and I mean really stuck if I'm 20 miles down the lake and I break down and I know I'm gonna have to spend the night I can just break this out I can buck up a whole nights worth of wood really quickly I can also cut poles for shelter really quickly making sure that I'm high and dry and comfortable for the night that I'm gonna spend out there I don't bother with bringing an extra tank of gas or oil for the chainsaw I just make sure that the reservoirs are filled before I head out that's all I need this guy's never let me down all right in terms of my GPS which is a really important tool to have here especially like in whiteout conditions like we had a couple hours ago I couldn't see I was out on the lake I literally could not see a thing having a GPS is really important in that situation obviously I would never trust it with my life you always want to make sure that you're watching what you're doing however this thing can really save your bacon reassure you of where you are all I got to do is touch the map whenever I want zoom in it tells me exactly where I am it's also moving along on the lake so it tells me whether I'm on a trail or a lake exactly where I am at all times tells me the time compass bearing I can mark waypoints I can do everything but what's important is where it's located as you can see it's directly in my line of sight it's just above my gauge cluster so I'm not looking down on my handlebars or anywhere else I'm not getting distracted from the trail or the lake I can just look straight on and then when I want to you know see something I can just tap it away it goes also pretty neat this thing cradles right into that mount so this was kind of an integrated solution with bombardier or skiddy but basically there's just contact points and it just shoves right in there look at that diary we'll never run out it's a lithium battery that's in there but it also is charging all the time in that cradle no wires no messing around awesome I'm just a true backcountry travel out you're on the lakes and the rales having really wide skins on your skis really gonna pay off for you so these are off to market had my skidoo dealer put them on look at the size of these skins I mean they're so wide when I'm out on the lake after I'll take a picture for everyone and show you guys exactly what these things are really looking like but my ski is only like like that wide but my skins are like that so all that's gonna do is keep me floating way up high so when I'm going down the lake 30 or 40 or 50 miles an hour I'm gonna be up a lot higher riding up a lot safer it's also when I get into the far back Bay's where the snow is starting to really pile in it's gonna keep me up it's gonna keep me up high not gonna make me dig down because as soon as you start digging down and bogging down you can get stuck and you don't want that especially if you're miles away from somewhere these things are invaluable I think there were only a couple hundred bucks at my skidder dealer well worth it I just wanted to show you these claws look like it's these guys right here hopefully that focuses so that cap comes off and there's a sharp edge in there push that down on the ice and then you take that lever right there and you just start screwing it and man these things are awesome and once I have those cleats or spikes into nice itself some spare batteries here's my winch it's all there the wiring is all complete inside here so nothing's hanging out I can take this winch and it's got a big carabiner on it I can attach it to any of the bumpers that are on the front of this sled look at the bumper system I got here you know let's have this this thing is invaluable it was all designed around that winch so have that winch control for the winch works great and I can just winch myself to safety or I can work off this back bumper as well and get myself out of a situation so just finishing off with the sled itself my camera gear is always in a Pelican case at the bottom of this carrier or this hitch whatever you want to call it but I always have my snowshoes here as well these are synthetic snowshoes Anker made by Faber these are a Bearpaw design a true really wide Bearpaw design synthetic shoe it's the only one that I actually am aware of on the market now full disclosure I'm a traditional snowshoe kind of guy love traditional wooden snowshoes I think they offer the best location but for this application where I'm packing stuff up to go out for the day and this is just my emergency kit if anything were to happen I like to have synthetics because at the end of the day they're just stronger you know if I if I'm going through a trail and I have these attached the way that they are and I get really close to a tree I've actually snapped wooden snowshoes carried in this manner once it snapped its it snapped or eight there's nothing you can do these guys won't do that it's an aluminum frame they are the widest Bearpaw synthetic snowshoe that I've ever seen I'm gonna take them off here and I'll show you guys bungee cords are great that when it's minus 30 it kind of suck alright so there's there's the synthetic faber this is the mountain quest Faber Bearpaw synthetic snowshoe it's the only one that I'm aware of in a synthetic model that is in this design look at all the flotation I got a cramp on and these big bindings that they offer actually accept big pack groups like this usually it's been a problem with synthetics accepting big boots but these ones work fine so this is what I carry again this is just for like heading out emergency kind of conditions they do offer good flotation as well not as good as traditional but they get the job done and for this application they are perfect okay we're almost done the sled Oh that should never ever ever happen now for the helmet and it's kind of an overlooked situation for a lot of people but it shouldn't be your helmet when you're snowmobiling out here in this true remote wilderness your helmet is such an essential piece of gear first of all whether you have a balaclava or two balaclavas or whatever you have for head protection and neck protection at end of the day this is what's gonna keep you warm this is an expensive helmet there's no getting around that it's a br p bv s2 helmet like $600 for helmet but it's insulated it keeps me really warm it's also got the integrated BBS to kind of breathing system so basically this little apparat is here covers my nose and my chin area and I'm breathing all my hot air is breathing right into there so once I've got that clicked in all my air is coming out here and you can already see that just from a short sled ride there's already Frost building up here and it's actually frozen sometimes you just got to clear that out but what that means is that instead of my hot air coming up into the visor system it's coming out here it can't go anywhere else because it's completely sealed by this why is that important well when it's -5 it doesn't really matter but when it's minus 30 if you got that whole face shield down and all your air is coming into the visor section you're gonna frost up and freeze up in there within like two three minutes you cannot see a thing you can't be stopping every ten minutes or five minutes or two minutes to scrape ice off the inside of your helmet you'll never get it all off and it's just a huge problem then if you got long distances to cover you're screwed now also once you get that frosted and there's any kind of Sun from the side or the front the glare is insane it'll blind you it's just it's just not a good situation another cool feature this helmet has is it's got that that's sunshield advisor right so this is polarized as well and when I'm heading down the lake this cuts out a lot of glare I can actually see things a lot better and more important than that when it's a really cloudy day when it's really overcast the lake it just all becomes a blend of gray and ice ridges and obstacles that could be presenting themselves on the lake you'll usually never see them but this helps doesn't always solve the problem but it does help you to see ice ridges and just definition on the lake so that's pretty cool full face shield and as added insurance this is also an electronic model that I can plug into my sled that has a receptacle it's just a cord like this so not only am i breathing out of here so that the air that my warm air isn't mixing with the cool air and the helmet fogging everything up but my visor itself is also heated so the combination of the two is going to keep me frost free all day I can worry about seeing what I'm doing instead of worrying about a frosted up helmet all right so we got the snowmobile set up we know what we're doing there now let's talk about kind of the meat and potatoes this entire system let's talk about what's in my pack the pack that I packed for heading out into the boreal on a snowmobile the essential items that I need not just to survive for a night or two but to thrive also we're gonna talk about my clothing system what I choose to take on my person as well as extra clothing that allows me to snowmobile all day stay warm but it's also functional and before we get started I do want to preface this we're saying this is what works for me out in this landscape this is not for everybody everyone does their own thing find what works best for you that's always the best way to do it this is what I found through trial and error is doing best for me so it's minus 31 right now I'm not stripping off all my layers I just can't do it my feet are already freezing but suffice to say underneath me here I have a smart wall base layer system top and bottom on top of that I have a wool power 200 weight thermal underwear system top and bottom when I'm snowmobiling I have a balaclava that not just covers my head area and my face also comes down and I make sure it contacts my skin it's got like a big big area on it that's really important so that no wind gets down underneath by your chest area and then I have a neck gaiter as well that goes over top of that and then when I'm about to put my helmet on I do put a liner to con just a really thin layer just for some extra protection sorry my my head's getting really cold here I'll show you guys here don't take me the wrong way show you what I wear underneath though for pants ISM wearing my green coat at Wal pants and I got suspenders on them too somewhere hey so then on top of my wool pants and my two layers a thermal underwear these are a pair of Outdoor Research just kind of snow pants I don't know what they are but they're hundred percent waterproof more importantly they're wind proof and they have some insulating properties but not much I just wear them for the wind proof nests and the the waterproofness on my feet I have only one base layer sock I do not personally find that layering socks to three layers of socks works for me I like to have a really thin sock and a really warm boot the whole point is to warm up the area between your sock and the edge of the boot right that pocket of air that's created you want to warm that up and I find that if I have too many socks on I'm so tight in the boot that I just cannot warm that air up and my feet end up freezing even with three layers of socks in this temperature my feet be colder than they are right now which is actually really really cold so anyways for boots Sorel glacier I've tried out so many boots boffins octants Shirelles these guys are still the best and the reason being they have a double sole so if you actually pull the boot apart there's a liner sole inside the liner there's also a removable sole at the bottom of the boot that's a lot of insulation and you lose a lot of your heat when it comes to foot wearing boots with contact in the cold ground so if you can add that much space between your foot and the ground instead of saying this much in another boot you know that's good this isn't so having that extra insulation layer I find works really really well but protect my core area again I have those two layers of thermal underwear then a wool sweater and then right now because it's really cold I have a synthetic fill Arc'teryx jacket on with a hood and then I have my outer layer that's with me all the time I absolutely love this thing it's so functional it's a boreal Mountain anorak maybe I'll put a link in the description actually I'm gonna put a link to everything that are talking about here today in the video description so you guys can just click away and check out all this gear and and do what you want with it yeah so that's how I protect my torso and then for hand protection on the snowmobile only I have these Outdoor Research gore-tex outer shell leather palm gloves leather palms really important because you're dealing with sticks and branches and whole bunch of crap all the time it's got to be durable they also have a removable liner so there's the liner and then the glove itself I really like these nice and long gauntlets as you can see these guys pay huge dividends all of my mitts that I bring out here for working in the bush or gauntlet style I just think that's the way to go gives you extra protection and they're nice and durable now the fun stuff the pack so I'm going to go through all this stuff again this is the equipment that makes me safe and feel comfortable out here in the boreal so we'll just get right into it thing before I get into the main potatoes of this pack I wear this pack all the time when I'm traveling so I have the cargo area again you saw the snowshoes and and the camera equipment and it was strapped in a lot of people wonder why I don't strap this pack in here's the answer if I go into the lake right if I if I hit a hole if anything happens to the sled and this is attached to it my lifeline my safety system is gone I might as well put up the white flag cuz I'm not walking back you know 30 kilometers and in minus 30 I'd freeze especially if I had already gone into the water with the sled let's say so I carry this on my person it's dropped to me and if I did hit a hole if I did fall in the first thing I would do is take this off throw that up on the ice get that away from me and then I always have my ice claws some guys warm around their neck I carry them in my pocket either way I'm gonna grab them this is just a cheap pair of wrap low ones or you can make some yourself boom these come out I can just right into the ice pull myself out I would say that within 10 to 15 seconds I can have my pack off I can be out of the ice and then I can deal with a really important situation at that point of just surviving and getting myself out I feel my mustache and beard starting to freeze okay let's go into the pack number one my water bottle it's a Nalgene water bottle it's right here cozy I fill this with hot water at the start of the day oh yeah she's still nice and warm look at that okay on the outside of my pack is my bow saw again my snow machine has my chain saw that goes in the water I'm gonna need something there's a soft guys it's cool down here I should let you know that I've already routed through this a little bit so things aren't as organized as I would like but I'll I'll go through everything with you pair of gloves in camp got to have extra gloves I also have these mitts which I'm actually gonna put on right now my hands are freezing the first thing that I did when I got off the snow machine is I I took my balaclava off and I shoved it in the pack so that's why that's their extra toque I always have a spare down jacket it never leaves the pack it's right there I can use it as a blanket it's just a really old beater down jacket but it pays huge dividends if you need extra insulation I have a satellite phone I have extra mitten liners I have an extra toque I have a pair of sunglasses and a pair of prescription glasses so I always have two extra sets of contact lenses that are sitting on an inside pocket so that they don't freeze because otherwise they'd freeze instantly and then I bring prescription glasses and my sunglasses so in times like this you can't really see it but the Sun is really bright glaring off the off the snow and the leak if I'm in camp at all if I'm stopped for a couple hours the first thing I'm gonna do is put these on because you got to protect your eyes at all time you know with the helmet on you got protection with the polarized visor and that's all UV coated and all that but in camp you really got to protect your eyes this year Outdoor Research Aurora bivy if I ever got into a really serious situation where I'm screwed and I need shelter quick like in the middle of a blizzard and I'm wet whatever have you if I want to get out of the elements quickly I know some of you might say bring a tarp personally I bring a bivy because within 20 seconds I can have the setup I can get inside of it and for however long it takes for that storm to pass I know that I'm not gonna get any more wet and I'm out of the elements I'm out of the wind the cold piercing wind and I'm out of the snow these Vivi's are lifesavers they're so small you can put it up anywhere this is a pot and in it is a lot of essential items and we gonna get into that minute but here are the mix that I have for in camp again leather palm these are sheepskin these things are awesome so warm oh I love these guys here we have one pair of socks it's also in a ziplock bag they're never gonna get wet and I also have a top and a bottom thermal and or a complete change of thermal underwear so if I'm soaking wet I can strip down quickly get these on I'm dry I'm sorry if I'm talking like really fast or just kind of weird like it's cold everything is cold right now I am cold it's hard to breathe in it's a mess so in here I have birch bark dried birch bark I also have a couple bandages but if I need to get a fire going real quick boom birch bark it is the fire starter of the boreal forest this stuff is incredible it will take a match it will take a flame instantly I'll take a spark off my my fire steel instantly gotta have some birch bark matches in a pill bottle these are the strike-anywhere style of matches I have a lighter I also have two lighters on my inside pockets cuz this one this ain't gonna work right now alright it's so cold but the ones on the inside pocket or work I have a spork from heavy cover canteen it's titanium nice and lightweight good there I got to move around for a sec guys I am so cold I'm out of breath I just ran I like sprinted back and forth for like two minutes just to try and get some blood pumping -31 out here once you start sitting still for a couple minutes it's just a mess I can't even speak right now it's like my jaw is frozen anyways let's get going with this let's talk about pot system here now this is in a plastic bag only because it's blocking and I don't want all my gear turn the block camera in there sometimes though I just have a double plastic bag system you could also use these plastic bags for other things like in a pinch you could put them on your feet because they don't breathe so all your heats going to be reflected back but anyways let's get talking about the pot set so the pot set itself as you can see is stainless that's because I can do anything with it I can get it over a fire it's really durable it is got a bail handle this thing is just awesome it's a zebra style can but let's open it up and let's see what we got inside here we have an extra lighter I have an extra thermal foil blanket you guys see these everywhere they're like couple bucks essential to have if you were in a real survival situation I have a couple things a tea and instant coffee because if I ever am stuck somewhere the last thing you want to do is panic you want to be able to be rational about the situation and just stopping for a few minutes and having a cup of tea will just allow you to focus a little bit more on the task at hand to allow you to take your mind off things calm down and then you can assess the situation so I always have tea and coffee with me I have a meal this is just some Uncle Ben's rice one pot meal I can cook this up and again it's not that I'm gonna starve out here if I'm stuck for a couple days it's about just being comfortable and taking my mind off things and just kind of calming right now I've got two candles in here candles are essential hand warmers I could probably use these on my feet right now flagging tape some people ask me why I use flagging tape well yeah I could use my ox and I could blaze trees but in the winter this stands out everywhere so I can use this to just mark a trail if I'm in an area where I'm kind of getting lost or I could be getting lost I could also use these to flag trees and other objects and if people were looking for me they would see this from a much further distance than an ox blaze or anything else because it contrasts so well with the snow that's essential people are looking for stuff that stands out if they're looking for you this will stand out compass gotta have a compass it also has a mirror you can signal with that and you can do lots of things with it you can stare it yourself – so compass I've got a headlamp right here batteries I take out so that there's no issues with it inadvertently turning on while it's in here so I just take my batteries together and then I've got a couple bales of snare wire here as well all right so that essentially is what I have with me at all times on my person the only other items you haven't talked about I have a multi-tool a gerber multi-tool I've got a buckle folding saw and I've got an adventurer sworn belt knife full-tang fixed blade that's what you want and this is it and there is a firesteel with that as well so what's the point to all of this well the point is to ensure that if you are out in true wilderness where there is likely no help or no help for a while if you put yourself in a situation where if you break down or you don't come home like you're supposed to or on schedule you know you're likely gonna spend one to three nights in the bush this is what I bring this is why I have prepared these certain items that I have with me everything was thought out and I sat there and analyzed what do I need what can I put into one pack that is going to allow me to thrive and make sure that I get through no matter what kind of a situation arises until help arrives and let's make no mistake about it this is not about surviving for a week or two this is about just making it through a few days so having some snare wire it's so easy at this time of year you see snowshoe hare tracks everywhere I can set up like 15 snares snaring is about numbers really so set up 15 snares I might get a rabbit I might get 2 I'm gonna eat that and yeah I'll be full my belly will be full for that night or – at age 4 people to come get me so just because of the severity of the wilderness that we're in you know I do carry a satellite phone and I know not everyone can carry one of these they are expensive there's also new devices called like the alarm in reach and spot those are gonna allow you to call home and and contact people back home and let them know where you are it might take them a day or two or three to get to you but that's fine so you make the call you do what you need to do you carry a tool with you in the toolbox that allows you to contact people and then you can use the items that you have here to just chill out relax be comfortable be aware of your situation but thrive out here and not be so worried and not freeze to death and not freak out you have items here to make you comfortable so with that I'm gonna pack up all this crap I'm gonna load back up on the sled I'm gonna head down the lake we got like 15 miles to cover today which doesn't sound like a lot but it's actually quite a bit but at the end of the road there are lake trout I'll see you on the next one it feels crunchy my eyes are heavy this is like I mean for the women out there is this what it feels like to wear makeup because because this sucks ah all right down on the lake we go

Solo Winter Survival Pack Out | Clothing, Equipment and Snowmobile Setup

33 thoughts on “Solo Winter Survival Pack Out | Clothing, Equipment and Snowmobile Setup

  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Oh how this one was painful to make…..standing still in sub -30 temps just sucks. Hope you all enjoy and I've posted links to A LOT of the equipment shown in the description so you can take a look at them. If anyone has feedback or suggestions or just ideas of gear / clothing that works for them, please share so we can all learn! Enjoy the day. It's only -36 here right now!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    good video for people that do not prepare for what can go wrong out in winter wilderness and changing conditions ,it isn't a joke and shit happens,cold hard facts, thumbs up chum

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Sick set up man . I go moose hunting in ear falls , and it's fucking snowing and cold in october but you know that already 🙂

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Damn dude…felt bad for you enduring that kind of cold while I’m drinking coffee on a Sunday morning. LOL. Great advice for when you’re in real S$!+. Thanks for sharing that great information Harlan. I’m sure this video will change a lot of people’s way of preparing for a quick ride in the winter. ATB Mike

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Just 2 words, "Toilet paper". I always bring TP. lol.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    A rifle and a axe and a flint should be the 3 first tools packed. As an American I pack a pistol on my chest too. A knife is nice but if I had to choose Id chose the axe first. Grasping the head a person can use it as a ulu to skin game and cut meat.

    Nice sled! I have been using Summits. But right now have a tracked Grizzly.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Interesting video and good clothing choices.
    MITTENS-> I have boiled wool Dachstein mittens for liners. They have been good at -40 F.

    PARKA-> My "camp parka" is a new Eddie Bauer PEAK XV baffled down parka. EB says it's good to -30 F. But with proper under clothing I know is good to -40 F./C. 

    PANTS-> Cabela's GTX Thinsulate insulated ski pants over Thermolite Micro insulated pants. Easily good to -40 F.

    BOOTS-> Sorel felt pacs W/ US Divers brand 3 mm thick closed cell neoprene socks over thin polyester liners. These are Vapor Barrier Liners (VBLs) to keep my sweat OUT of the felt pac liners for all day warmth.

    GOOGLES-> I use ski googles as pert of my face protection with a balaclava for no exposed skin.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Well done! The only things I would suggest adding would be a lithium booster pack in the event your skidoo battery dies, an Exped XP 9 downmat to keep you insulated from the ground when using your bivy, Adding CAT Tourniquet/holder to your belt and having a Israeli bandage easily accessible in the unfortunate event of a chainsaw or axe injury. Also, check out the white Canadian military bunny boots as they are the warmest boots you can wear for your environment hands down. I've been wearing them for years and they are fantastic. Stay safe out there!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Awesome bro great choices and thank u for making the vid in -30 lol… its been like that here in New Brunswick off and on too….cheers my friend !;:;;;,;; Spook

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    The things I trust and have tested when soaked and it's -30 are a good synthetic puffy jacket and pants, nalgene and thermos with hot water, spare mitt and boot liners and socks (or all rubber boots, or waterproof socks over fresh socks so you can then wear the wet boots again), and if you have a sled and extra space, a synthetic sleeping bag/pad/shelter and camp stove is the best insurance. If no bag you can keep moving with the puffies on and drinking hot water, you'll dry your layers underneath if they're the right material. If using the extended survival (camping) method with the sleeping bag, boiled water in a nalgene inside the bag will speed drying, and use the thermos for drinking hot water. If you have a camp stove and food you could lie in your bag for days, boiling water and eating until help came. Once you dry out no reason to just lie there though. When cold and wet, I like to have the things that will fix my situation fastest, and ideally for the least weight/space taken up. If it's -30 and I'm soaked, my finger dexterity may not last long enough for the fire to get going, especially if my sled went under and I had no axe/chainsaw. In that case I know a bag and hot water will do the job quick. I can then get a fire later. I like your spare mitts, extra jacket, and birch to get that fire fast. I like the bivvy but I have used them myself and if it's not breathable enough, the moisture won't escape. I've tested going from being cold one night with a frosted bivvy to going bare sleeping bag the next and being warmer as the sweat wasn't trapped and dripped back onto me.
    These are the multiple day situations I plan for, the layers of my system so if I lose one I have the lesser ones:
    1. I have a sled and can bring extra to basically camp outside, like an axe and gun, might as well have a sleeping bag, shelter, extra puffy pants/jacket, stove, and food. That way I can ice fish and not worry about just getting home, surviving, or tending fire. If I fall through and get soaked I can use the sleeping bag/puffy layers and stove to dry out and warm up. If stove doesn't work, hot thermos is awesome to warm up the core quick.
    2. I have just a backpack, I can make do with puffy layers and constant steady movement if I fall through, get soaked. I would have spare socks, mitts, headwear, water, stove/small pot optional, and food so I could go a long ways. Bivvy/tarp for shelter.
    3. I have nothing but a fire starter and knife in my pocket (flint striker and vasoline cotton balls in a film container work better than a lighter) and I must make a fire and keep it going all night to dry out and stay warm if I fell through and got soaked.

    I know all your clothes are very warm for snowmobiling, and paired with a fire, snow shelter, pine boughs you'd be fine sleeping in only a bivvy. I know the bite of taking off gloves in that weather with wind too, and if you're uncomfortable staying still for long I'd like to know if you've tested sleeping in only the bivvy with the clothes on your back with no fire, and whether you had to supplement it with a snow shelter, used candles to help heat it up, and how warm the inside of your bivvy could stay. I know with a summer tent and a few people inside the temp can be 40 degrees (liquid condensation) while it's -30 outside. I also know how much warmer it can be just getting in the treeline out of the wind and using snow to insulate. I am just curious how well only the bivvy works for you. But worst case is you go through ice and are soaked and you're spending multiple days outside. If the bivvy doesn't allow water vapor to escape well, you'll stay wet. Obviously you'd have to be keeping a fire to dry out. But if you're ice fishing, and trying to stay out there instead of go home, a good camp stove to get water boiled fast is a good alternative to the fire (or say you're stuck in the middle of a lake that's miles wide). I am assuming you are wearing gear that you trust to move moisture and dry quick, I could see the frost buildup on the jacket. Have you tested a fall through and rewarming drill? All that wool will insulate when wet and all, but the thicker wool especially will definitely will hold water for longer than other materials (but when it's -30 I know the water does seem to evaporate quicker because the air is drier).

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    How many lumens is the headlamp?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Really cool.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Tell us more about your axe, it never brakes down or refuses to start, but you do need to know how to use it.
    Is the Birch bark your only kindling you carry, I find that a rag soaked in diesel fuel is great for starting a fire…
    And I prefer to cover the chain saw in a cloth cover to keep light snow and wet slob off the saw,
    Often they won’t start when covered in slob, ice or snow…
    Just works for me…

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Very thorough, Harlan. Nice gear! 🙂

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    That looks very cool.Enjoyed it a lot !!!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Great video. Good job explaining your kit (and in the real environment, not your living room). Just few more things "I" would add: a lot more high calorie dense food (esp fats to burn through the night); basic first aid kit; and a foam pad (sitting or laying on cold surfaces just sucks the heat out of your body by conduction). Also a pair of heavy glove liners to wear when doing tasks. I prefer to never expose my bare hands except for briefest moment to complete a delicate task. (they would have been nice during this video shoot). Again, thanks for taking the time. I'm still trying to warm up. 😉

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    You have yourself and your sled decked out beautifully!! Labrador or the Arctic, you're good to go!!!
    Only thing I would add is a good pair of binos, and my rifle is a .270 short mag..!!
    New subscriber..Cheers from Manitoba!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Came across your channel a few days ago,sub it and have watched a few vids. When i saw it first i thought it must be NFLD, it seem the same.Just love the great outdoors.Thumbs up.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Great Vid Harlan! You have exceptional equipment and are very knowledgeable about each piece. The Survival kit in the billy pot is the way to go!. I've used a smaller version in a used coffee can (or my solo stove pot). I too use a satellite communicator (InReach) but will eventually add a PLB device as that system works a bit faster in terms of response times with SAR. Keep the videos coming.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Great breakdown of some very well thought out gear choices. Thanks Harlan
    Nate

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Honest opinion on the Boreal mountain shirt… I have one and its not worth 500$

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Great video. Super good camera. Sharp image. I know you have the experience to not need suggestions from the peanut gallery but I'll do it anyway. I too snowmobile to places where there may not be other people for a couple of days and would be too far to walk out of in a day (70 yrs old) so I carry "emergency" stuff too. I always have a light aluminum colapsable shovel strapped to the snowmobile. The kind backcountry skiers carry. Collapses to about 14 inches. Useful if stuck in deep snow but also in an emergency night out, like a grouse or ptarmagin, sometimes the best place to keep warm is IN the snow for insulation so it can be used to make a shelter of some kind, even a snow covered trench covered with spruce boughs to hold snow or a snow covered lean-to just barely big enough to slide into. (Your snowshoes could perform that task) I carry a large heavy duty industrial garbage bag I can slip into to prevent getting wet from body heat melting the snow or it can be cut open for uses like a tarp. Maybe your bivy will do that and keep you dry.
    In my pot I keep about a 20 inch coil of stripped copper 14 gauge house wire (Nice and flexible) to hang my pot over a fire if needed (miscellaneous other uses as well).
    About 20 ft of orange cord (like parachute cord) to tie whatever.
    Unlike a 2 stroke snowmobile that can be rope started if the battery of a 4 stroke goes bad your done! A good thing to add would be a small lithium battery booster. Mine (400 amp) is not much larger than a cell phone plus about 10 inches of the cable. Can also be used to charge a phone and has a good light. Would easily slip into one of your leather mitts.
    For little items or pins you don't want to be fishing around in the snow for if dropped, like your gun case pin, I tie about 6 inches of bright orange or red cord to so it's easy to find. Even tied one to my spoon. Or teather the pin to something on the frame.
    Have also frequently encountered wolves or come across their kills. Spending a dark night out with these guys around creeps me out too. In Saskatchewan, unless you have a hunting or trapper license in season, I don't know if you can carry a rifle. I think you can't but I've never really checked into that.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Great video, thanks for producing this and including such pertinent info including the links to those wool pants. We try to do a lot of snowmobile touring in North-Eastern Ontario (home) and started winter camping in Algonquin Provincial Park 'cause truthfully, it's much easier than up here in the bush. Even though we sled in a high traffic area, you inspired me to pack a few more essentials beyond the tarp, tow rope & fire starting gear I currently pack. Keep up the good work and since I just subscribed, its now time to check out your other videos.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    This is without a doubt the best video on what you need for being out in the woods that I have seen, and I have been looking for just one this good for a long time. Thank you and have a cup of coffee

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Great video and enjoyed hearing about all you gear and accessories to survive. Where do you leave your dog during the day while you are exploring? I'm sure that you have a small fortune invested in all that essential equipment. Take care, Harlan and enjoy the rest of your time in the wilderness of Northern Ontario.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Great video… pure reality!! No Hollywood BS. Just how it really is and that makes the point. After this video, nobody can not get it and truly understand a -30 or so situation. Nice shots as well!! Thanks dude!!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Great video! … Really enjoyed it. Gave me some great ideas for my own trips to keep safe.
    Thanks for sharing!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    excellent video stay safe

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Hello Harlan, Great video, I am looking forward to seen you at Canoecopia In Madison this March.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Your make-up-saying made my day 😅 Great video Harlan, and thank you for sharing your experiences. I look forward to try out what works for me in a few years, but first we have to build our log cabin.

    Regards from Switzerland

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Excellent adventure. Enjoyed watching it. All the best and stay warm my friend. Rod

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Awesome video. The can't be easy to do that video in -31

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  • June 17, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Could you do a video of the boots in this video (closer look)?

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