before we get into weaving I find it useful to do a quick review of the knots using something that's easier to tie like a soft cord versus jumping right into the the heavy stiff fish line so you can shorten your shorten your line so that it'll just pass maybe it's about twice the width of your snowshoe and just clamp the one end to fix this so we'll just be working with our free end for now the first knot you won't use it very often just when you're tying on to start your weave and again when you're tying off to finish the weave we just use the most basic of knots the half hitch typically a double half hitch would do well but with the slippery fish line I like to do a triple high pitch so for a half hitch I'm gonna take my line pass it over the snowshoe frame on the right side pass it under the snowshoe frame bring the line up and pass it over itself so I've crossed the line and now this little space that I've left between the cross in the line and the snowshoe frame I'll just pass the end of the line through that so that's my half hitch that's our most basic of knots it's just one twist in the line and pass your line through that twist pull it nice and tight to the frame that's a single half hitch to continue onto the double half hitch I'll just pass the line around itself once more and pass it into that loop that I create pull that tight clean up the knot so that both of those two half hitches are stacked up nice and neat here on the side of the frame that would do well with this string but with the fish line I'll go once more pass the line around itself and into that loop I'm creating and then dress it up nice and neat by pulling that knot nice and tight to the other ones there's my triple half hitch and I also especially with the stiff fish line I don't like to snip it real short and then it sticks up like a little bristle I'll leave it a little bit long and then I can just tuck that into my weave later let's try that once more untie that I've secured one end of my line take the other end pass it over the frame back under the frame over itself and into a little space that I've created between the frame and the line pull nice and tight keep rolling around the line another time into that loop pull it nice and tight and keep that line rolling again round itself into the loop and that's our triple half hitch the larks head can seem like a little less familiar knot but it's actually just a girth hitch tied a slightly different way and most of us even if we don't know the name of the girth hitch we are familiar with the girth girth hitch now a girth hitch is simply when we take the middle of a piece of string you can do that now and then pass the two tails around the object you want to tie to so I'm passing the two tails of the string around the snowshoe frame and then just pass them under the string so just past it I just passed the two tails through the string and pull tight and that is a girth hitch also known as a larks head knot when we tie it slightly differently and this is the key feature both of our tails of string are coming out from the middle of the knot here so that's what we're looking for now unfortunately it's it's very easy to tie that grid such unfortunately with snowshoe weaving we don't have both ends of the fish line free so we'll have to tie it a bit differently so I'll get you to secure the string on the left side of the frame again so that we just have one end to work with so when we're tying the larks head it's a little bit different we're gonna go over the frame under the frame over the line so we've crossed the line over itself and then we will go immediately back underneath the frame over the frame again and I've held on with my left hand I've held on to this loop of line and I will pass the end of the rope underneath that loop pull all that tight and you end up with that nice familiar girth hitch where I've got two strands coming through a bend of rope and you can pull that nice and tight so I'll try that again I've secured the line along the left side of the frame I'll take my free end of line pass it over the frame under the frame cross it over itself hold on to that piece that just made that cross then you'll send your free end under the frame back over the frame and underneath that piece of string you were holding onto and you'll find your old familiar larks head knot now it's really easy to do here when we're doing the step-by-step instructions as soon as we start into the pattern and you start trying to remember all these other aspects of the pattern the larks head seems to be the first knot that goes right out of people's minds and gives them trouble all day so it's worthwhile to spend a little bit of practice here on the larks head and also to look at it and just remember what it looks like here and that's why I showed you that girth hitch as a reminder of another way to tie and and how it should look when it's done so now I've made it down here to my larks head right and it doesn't quite look like I'll make it over to my right side so it's time now at a larks head is the perfect time to splice on another piece of line so I'm gonna measure I want the cable crimp I'm gonna use these little aluminum cable crimps to add a new piece and I want that cable crimp to lay right here on the inside of the snowshoe frame so I'll measure I'll start my Lark set I'm going over the frame under the frame and then I come back up as if I was going to continue my larks head by going over itself here but I'll stop right here and I want to clip my line right here at the top of the frame which will leave the end of the line right along the inside of the frame so I'll just snip that so I just snip that right at the top of the frame I'll count more coils here okay it doesn't matter that my line that my larks head has started to undo itself that's okay I measured it in the right spot and snipped it so when I go to tie it again it'll be the correct length and I simply insert that crimp onto one end of my new line I'll have the old line going in the opposite direction there it's got a little anvil you can use a nice flat rock or a piece of concrete concrete floor as well and I just like to have I have that fish line protrude past the crimp just a little bit just gives it a bit more bite and then I'm using the rounded end of a ball-peen hammer and just flattening that out a couple shots on the other side as well you

Snowshoe Weaving Part 2: Knots and Splicing

5 thoughts on “Snowshoe Weaving Part 2: Knots and Splicing

  • July 27, 2019 at 11:10 pm
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    Do you know if weed eater line is the same as monofilament? Specifically , 2mm.

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  • July 27, 2019 at 11:10 pm
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    Needs to be able to add pics to show , if it is possible let me know how and I will.

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  • July 27, 2019 at 11:10 pm
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    I have been making and filling snowshoes for over 35 years and have never seen fill for a snowshoe spliced in such a manner, totally unnecessary to do it this way.

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  • July 27, 2019 at 11:10 pm
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    Best tutorial I have seen. Love the over head camera view to see first person. Slow instructions and exaggerated movements really help to see what you are doing. Proper teacher right here! Can't wait to get my bear paws from you guys.

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  • July 27, 2019 at 11:10 pm
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    Traditional? Why not use rawhide?

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