So, I always use this
large table saw sled for sizing up lumber
or making cross-cuts. And with a long steel guide bar
its really sturdy so I can easily cut the end off of a large
8 foot piece of lumber. But for small stock
it's not ideal. So, I built myself a small table saw sled. And, this
one doesn't have to be very large because I already
have the other slide. And this sled has turned
out to be really, really handy and I've
used this an awful lot. And sometimes people ask me about
how to build one of these. So, I've got some ideas on
how to improve on this one. So, I'll build another one and
make a video to show you how. With a runner that's
gonna run in a T-slot. I'm gonna use some
exotic hardwood. This, I think, is Cocobolo. I picked that out of a dumpster
from some hardwood flooring store. So, I'm gonna rip that to just a
bit wider than I need it to be. So, the T-slot in my saw measures 756 thou Here's 805. My piece is about 50 thou
wider than the slot. So, I'm gonna take the fence and move that by
exactly 50 thou. So, using a dial indicator actually not that hard to get one
of these things on the thou. Just by bolting it. So, so far this doesn't fit in. Not
unless I drove it in with a hammer. And measuring this I get 760 thou. We're shooting for about 755. But what happened is as I was only
grazing the side of the saw blade the blade got deflected
this way a little bit. But, now if I make another cut and move the fence
by about 6 thou. I should be able
to get it bang on. Let's check that fit. And that appears to
be a very exact fit. So, on my previous
table saw sled I just screwed the guide
rail to the bottom. But on this one, I made
it a little bit thicker so it sticks out above the table.
And I put a dado this is just a test piece into the plywood. So,
that's gonna catch on here. Make the rail a bit thicker and
give it better attachment. And I cut that dado just with
a series of table saw cuts using a saw blade that
has got flat teeth. This is a 9 inch
Freud saw blade. With flat-top teeth. I want to start that dado
at about the same distance that I've got from the edge of the blade
to here. So that's 11 centimeters. But I need to move my fence to be 11 centimeters
from the blade and this is just a few
millimeters more. That's good. That gives me a
little bit of safety margin. I need to widen that
slot by just a smidgen. So, here's my dado.
It looks very nice. And this fits in. I've got,
unfortunately a few thou of play. So, I'm gonna try some hot glue to take out that play. I don't really
want to glue this in permanently but I just want to get
rid of the play. So, I'm pre-heating the
wood and the rail here. And when I put the hot glue on there,
it will flow nicely so I don't get this thick bead in there. I'm just putting a tiny
bit of glue in there. Just enough to fill a
few thou of the gap. Gotta work quickly. Ok, that's stuck in there good. I'm using some 1/2
inch number 4 screws, to now lock this bar in place. And I've pre-drilled them to be just a
tiny bit smaller than the other diameter of this screw because
in this exotic hardwood these screws really hold. Next I need to make the
front and back rails. And I'm starting with a
big piece of 2 by 10. And I'm cutting the end off of that
using my other table saw sled. And once more over the jointer to remove
and snipe from the thickness planer. Now, I'm far from done
with making this sled but the next step here is
to cut the slot in it. Next, I need to mount
the fence part on here. And that needs to be exactly
perpendicular to the line of cut. Now, having cut my slot already I can just use the square. Put that flush with this here. Just using another
piece of wood. And that lines up for
where to put this here. Now the square I'm using
is just a framing square. In my experience these are very
reliable squares. I've never had a framing square that
was out of square. So, I always trust these
for my reference. What I neglected to do before
I screwed this together is to put a chip for on
the inside edge here. That way, there's a place for some
of the sawdust to get caught. And, I'm just gonna screw
this back together. And the location of my screw
holes are all very tight. It's gonna help
things line up again. So, hopefully I'll have it all precise.
But I'll give it a check. Now I'm ready to mount the
rest of the floor of this jig. And how I mount that is
actually not that important. Now to keep my hands from
possibly touching the blade when it comes out
of the sled maker. I'm just gonna glue a little
block of wood on here. Now, here's a new safety feature which I'm not entirely
sure if it's a good idea. We'll see how it works out. This little block is
gonna fit on here and it prevents the sled from
moving too far back. So, what I'm doing is this block is
normally up but when I push the slide back it'll catch on my
outfeed extension and so I can't push it far enough
that the blade comes really far out. So, unless I'm making
a really deep cut when I push this as
far as it will go the blade doesn't
really come out here. It's coming out here
just in the corner here. But I'd really have to reach hard down
here to even catch that with my fingers. So, it should be an adequate safety thing.
I didn't want to make the sled too bulky on here. I put 3 coats of varnish
on the sled. But only 1 coat on the inside so
it doesn't get too slippery there. So, here's my sled all finished.

Small table saw sled
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44 thoughts on “Small table saw sled

  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    This guy is a master dumpster diver.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Great work, as always! As to framing squares, I have two, and neither is square. For some reason, both squares are off more on the inside than the outside. Curious about your rip fence; what kind is it? I need a rip fence the old (early ‘80s) Craftsman table saw I am restoring. It is purring like a kitten, cuts great, but I really need a decent fence. Best wishes.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    your equipment works very well. Can you show how to tune up the table saw drill press and jointer?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Sawdust from CB is very dangerous. I always wear a respirator when dealing with exotic woods.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Hmmm, Mastercraft caliper, powerfist dial indicator, guessing Matthias is a fellow canuk! I'll be keeping my eye out at crappy tire, princess auto, Lee valley, busy bee, ect from now on!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    also if you don't trust your square just check it, right? hehe

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Yes I know He's Canadian as am I but living in the usa

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Matthias Wandel for President!!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    need to cover that small bit where the blade comes through, it is so small now that it would be easy to forget where your thumb could be

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Mattias
    Have you built a sliding table that can cut any angle yet?
    I had scheppach table saw back in the 1990's and it had a sliding table with all angles.
    I must admit, once you've used a tool a certain amount of times and you know it's falts, you get used to it and you suss out the glitches and work them out, I'd rather have that old scheppach table saw than put up with what's on offer today.
    Love the videos man ☺

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    This video is paradoxical! You used a larger sled to build the smaller sled! Just kidding, great video i intent to make my own miter sled tomorrow

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Cocobolo on the dumbster???
    Dumb peolpe 🙁
    Cocobolo and purpleheart are the only two exotic woods i have, here un costa Rica Is almost imposible to buy walnut or oak, not even Baltic birch plywood

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    👍👋👋👋.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    I know Avasva has the best online plans ever

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Hi Mathias. Yup, I'm late to the party! That cutting tool deflection is a common challenge in lathe metal working as well. One trick is simply to take a second pass without altering the tool setting – or in this case the fence. The lower cutting forces minimise the spring in watever sprung. BobUK.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    I like all your salvage finds.. great stuff to pick up that people once left behind. Ive been cruising around our local flooring shop but as of lately no such luck lol

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Just finished first sled. Great series…always appreciate your orderly processes.. thanks!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Great video. Thanks for sharing 👌🏻👌🏻

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    I've sometimes wondered why they send along that guard thingy when you buy a table saw. Must be for safety, although it does keep sawdust from blowing into one's face.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    How did your square the back fence? Since the sled is reversible, shouldn't the back fence be square as well?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    I have a small table saw, 8 in. and I would like to make a sled. You made a small sled for a big table saw.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    What kind of varnish did you use? I’m a complete newbie to woodworking and follow your channel for everything! Thanks!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Matthias,
    I just bought a cheap table saw for use in my garage.
    So I was looking for ideas for easier use and came across this video.
    I love the idea of making my own tools – I was an engineer by trade many years ago and we often made or adapted our own tools in the workshop.
    What I would like to know is about the dial gauge. You appeared to screw it down, yet I did not see a hole of any type in the saw table. Does it just have a pot-magnet underneath, or how does it stay in place?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    that is Ipe-wood.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    why so many sleds have that wood base.Can't the table from the tablesaw be used to ride the wood.So you end up with a smaller and lighter sled???

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    At 5:30 you did not use a sled/fence

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Just curious if you remember the smell of that exotic wood, when i turned cocobolo on the lathe i always thought it smelled like pickles. Funny

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    The Sled stop was an insanely over engineered addition. I love it! Keep up the great vids!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Hey könntest du mir schreiben wie gross du den Schiebeschlitten gemacht hast?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Wow, this is the first video where I see the way to build a sled that I use myself. I will have finished my 1000th sled by christmas. This method is easy, fast and accurate.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Love the idea of using a dado to give you a thicker runner. For saws like my old Craftsman contractor saw with really shallow miter grooves, a thin runner attached to a flat bottom might not perform as well over time.

    Also a great idea to use a single runner and make the sled reversible for 2 cut locations, one in the middle like a standard crosscut sled and one on the edge, which gives more fence support for longer workpieces.

    And cutting the base in two and butting the edge of the square up to another piece of wood allows for easier squaring of the fence than trying to eyeball whether the kerf lines up with the edge of the square.

    I will definitely be trying all of these in my next sled. Pure genius!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Absolutely love that you use a dial indicator. Most people don't get that finicky with woodworking

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    I like the safety block that engages the out feed extension.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    I'd like to use a similar "raise the saw into the wood" technique to cut a shallow 2mm-wide 5mm-deep groove. I would push the wood through the saw normally, except that the groove doesn't travel the whole length of the wood – it's in the middle (to allow 2mm-thick boards to slot in). I have a router table so I could always just buy a groove cutting disc bit and be done with it, but I wondered if the table saw method is just good enough to save me the purchase (except I'd have to chisel out to the edges after and depth isn't easy to judge)

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    mathias congratulations from Barranquilla Colombia

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Why you haven't made a feeder rather that the clumsy stick

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Very nice build! At the next! #PaoloBradaDIY

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    The sled I made wood have come out a lot better had I watched this first.  I made some mistakes, but at least it made for a good YouTube video for my channel.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Wish the blade came up that easily on my antique belt drive craftsman cast iron table saw. Ok, I need new handles too.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Thanks for this Matthias, I was wanting to make one and I'm glad you have a video on it.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Nicely done and I love the safety features! So many people don't care about their fingers these days and even defend NOT using any safety equipment.

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