11 thoughts on “Sandia F4 Phantom – 1988 "Rocket-sled test"

  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    Made final good use of the aging, retired F-4 🙂

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  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    LOL, another 9/11 with foot in mouth disease. Here he clearly says "if the sitting mass is a lot [as in the lower unheated or damaged denser construction of the lower ~80 floors of the Trade Towers] and the hitting mass is low [as in the much lighter constructed ~20 floors of the upper Trade Towers], the sitting mass wins. It has never been demonstrated scientifically that any hitting of the upper floors was possible without liberal amounts of explosives by the way. The hallmark of a true "debunker". Pure, unadulterated hypocrisy

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  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    You just have to wonder why this video has the left side of the high speed camera footage of the F4 nose hitting the wall cropped so that you can not see how the nose crumples in a real life crash situation, unlike the phony images of the 767 sinking into the Trade Tower 2 as if was tissue paper?

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  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    Why are we never shown what is left after the dust settles? THIS would be interesting.

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  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    This IDIOT, doesn't even know the kinematic equation. Ke=1/2M(Vsq)
    M(Vsq) is for high velocity, such as radio and light waves.

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  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    Too bad the 9/11 planes weren't doing 500mph as NIST said. An airliner CANNOT fly that fast at that low an altitude. The engines would be choking. They make peak power when the air is most thin.

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  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    Does anyone know what model Phantom II this is? All I can tell is that it has the IRST bulb.

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  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    So if a beer can can go through concrete if given enough velocity, then why aren't bullets made of aluminum? Simple answer is that a beer can cannot be accelerated to a high enough velocity ( in normal sea level atmospheric conditions). Without additional mass and or reinforcement the beer can will stall due to air resistance long before it reaches " penetration velocity". If the beer can was filled with lead, then it may have a chance, but only if the lead was in full contact with the beer can. It would be an interesting experiment. My guess is that the aluminum beer can would disintegrate upon contact and be splattered by the friction and kinetic and inertial energies of the two stronger materials on either side at impact. If any of the aluminum made it through the concrete, it would only be due to being carried or pushed by the heavier element behind it.

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  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    Im curious as to why you manipulated the conversation and dubbed certain remarks in key places sometimes repeating the same remarks.? Why didn't you just post the entire conversation as it actually happened?

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  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    911, yeah right- that happen

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  • July 29, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    This is my favorite crash test ever. Thanks for posting.

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