all right this is SSL family dad and today we're going to talk all about the outdoor wood burner you okay so many of you have asked we just moved into this home and spend about two months now since we've been living here and one of the huge selling features of this house was this outdoor wood burner and a lot of you have asked about that in previous videos that I've done about collecting wood and things you know what is this thing how does it work and all that kind of stuff I'm assuming that must be people that are not in northern climates or maybe just haven't ever seen one they're very popular here in Michigan I know a lot of other northern states especially when you get up north in the Upper Peninsula and things like that and especially out in the country where you have to use propane to heat your home propane is very expensive it fluctuates with the price of oil you know just five six years ago it wouldn't be unheard of to spend over a thousand dollars to fill your your tank several times a year at least and that's that can get very pricey to heat your home in the winter so many people have installed these outdoor wood burners so today I just want to go through how it works you know what what process I've been using that I found is works with wood and stuff like that how easy this thing is and what it does for us it's it's as close as you can get to free heat for your home all the wood that we're burning here has been harvested off the land that we have here and so we haven't paid for anything besides the minimal amount of electricity that it takes to run this and so let's dig in and see how it works okay so basically this is how it sits about 95 percent of the time just a little bit of smoke rolling out of the chimney there it's just kind of at a smolder right now there's coals in there it's basically choked off of air so it's not currently currently running I guess you'd say the the feed door at the front here is pretty good-sized it's probably about two feet by two and a half feet and so you can add quite a bit of wood or good size obviously you can't add something this big in there that will need to be split or cut in half but you know you can fit whole logs in there so I'm just putting putting this stuff right in the door real big size stuff here I mean that will roll right in there this one I'm not sure I mean you cut that one but and a lot of the stuff is fairly green so that's another bonus for this thing is that you can burn some pretty green wood in here I've noticed and I'll show you how this works here when the blower comes on but that when that blower comes on there it's like a it's like a like a coal furnace it's hot and it's it'll it'll dry that wood out obviously sitting here smoldering like it does the woods just in there right now just it's super hot and it's moisture is just venting off the top there and so it dries out without so what we have here is this is the the fill or the level of water and so this is just a float in here and this tells you how much water is in the boiler and there's a huge tank somewhere on the top here of this and I don't know how many gallons this one is I'm guessing it's probably about 150 or so and so it's a big thermal mass there on the top of water and so that's what it heats up and then it's constantly circulating that back and forth into the house so right back here this is the controls it's very simple there is a circulation pump and this is just a hot water circulation pump this runs all the time I don't know what the wattage draw is on this I'd have to look that up it's not much I plan to run this off of solar down the road but right now it's just we have electricity run out here and that's that's what it's running on so so the circulation pump just constantly keeps that water circulating from in the house to out here this is a just a thermostat or a thermometer I guess in this case just tells us what it's at we keep it between 150 170 degrees so you can set that hotter or cooler but that seems to work pretty good and then you just have this blower here the blower itself will come on when it calls for heat so there's this thermostat here that this is basically the same as what's on a furnace there's a temperature sensor in the inter near the tank and then when this hits that temperature it sends the allows power to flow to the blower and blow or this lifts up allows air to come in and it forces air into that into that firebox and when that thing when that thing kicks on like I said it just flares that fire right up and it heats this water up quick most of the time it stays closed and so the wood you know sitting in there doesn't really burn it just sits there and waits for the blower to come on again all right you can see once that blower kicks on this thing just burns it doesn't run long because that with the flame like that in there it'll uh it'll heat that water up quick but a single it'll dry out and you can see the wet wood here and this is what two it'll dry ahead stuff out quick and seems to burn just fine so log that sighs we'll be in there for that we'll be in there for a couple days okay so coming on to the inside here we've got this kind of mess in this little closet so we're on a slab here this is a what we inherited from the previous owners not exactly the the prettiest plumbing job may want to redo some of this at some point I'll see PVC and stuff like that and impacts for the boiler stuff but not exactly my favorite but anyway so the hot-water lines from the boiler they come in back here there's one here and one here they kind of sneak in through the wall on the back there and that's the hot water comes in and then the cooler water goes back out to the boiler to get heated again so the first thing it does is it comes in underneath our furnace here and it comes over to the this is the water heater so I'll show you a up top view so that's the water here there so the hot water actually comes in the bottom here and it goes through this little pipe it's like a heat exchanger so the water there's a pipe that runs directly through the center of this and then there's a sleeve of water around it so the hot water from the boiler outside comes in and it goes around that pipe and then it goes back out here and that pipe that's there's a pipe in the center of this so there's the outlet and the inlet is down below that goes into the water heater actually goes into where the drain valve normally is in the water here so the cooler water that settles at the bottom of hot-water tank it kind of thermal siphons through here and gets heated and then goes up through this pipe and then dumps in to the top of the hot water tank and then again as it cools down hits thermal siphons through and gets heated again so there's no mixing of the outside boiler water with our fresh water or hot water here but it heats it through that thermal siphon so this could be adapted to any any hot water tank so after the hot water goes through that heat exchanger heats the hot water for the house it comes over here and then goes up this is a bypass so you can shut the furnace part off if you just want to heat your hot water in the summertime but don't want to heat the house so that's closed right now because we're heating the house and out water and then this goes up and into this this coil or heat exchanger of sorts it's basically like a Kyrie dieter just backwards hot water goes in here and cycles through this coil and this is where the plenum is from the furnace and the air obviously blows through that and then goes up into the ductwork of the house and the cooler water here will come out it's not really cooler it's still hot this is always the the circulation pump is always running so this is always circulating through here so the stuff is all warm in this closet is very warm but the cooler water will go back out here and then down and then it goes back out to the boiler now what this is here this wonderful look at this gas line job that is just awful I'm going to be taking that apart but anyway this here goes to a freshwater supply and so this is how you top off the whole system so if we want to add some water to it we can turn our valve here and that goes just pumps fresh water into the system so we can top it off a little bit fill that outside tank and when when that is full we shut that off and we can go check that float level outside and see how full that that tank is so so we'll take you over to the thermostat just kind of show you how that works okay so we've got two thermostats here one of which is not really secured to the wall properly but this one here is our propane thermostat this is the normal furnace thermostat if I had the propane turned on the thermostat would you know come on and often heat the home with with that propane this thermostat here is the second one this is for the actual boiler the outdoor burner and so since I have this kind of turned off right now it doesn't really matter but I have this set at you know whatever temperature you want so right now it's at about 70 I want to below 70 degrees in the house this trips on and the blower kicks on in the furnace and just the blower that's all that comes on and it just blows air over the that heat exchanger with all that hot water in it and it heats the house and then when this obviously is satisfied and it's up 17 degrees then it kicks off and the blower goes off now what you can do is have your propane set as a backup so you can set this say it like 90 degrees or 65 degrees or something like that and then if your boiler ever you know ran out of wood or it got too cold or you know you weren't able to feed it or something like that then the propane furnace could come on as a backup and heat the home or keep it you know keep it above well freezing at least or or comfortable so you could still use that but I don't plan to use the propane at all this year that's my goal alright guys so that pretty much wraps it up for the tour of the outdoor wood-burning heater or boiler this thing is just absolutely awesome I this was again one of the selling points we moved into this house it's not free but it's very close to free we just got our first electric bill from this house and it was just less than half of what we paid at the the old house or a first utility bill in general so we don't have any gas appliances we don't use any propane here this supplies all of the heat and all the hot water that we need we never run out of hot water the hot water is very hot and we have dishwashers and washing machines and you know five people in the house using hot water taking showers and all that kind of stuff never never have a problem that running out at all so very very cool little unit if you guys have questions or anything about you know running this thing or anything like that that I didn't answer in the video please let me know especially if you're looking at buying one that's one of the reasons I did the video for people looking at you know purchasing these things one question I get is you know how often do I put wood in it that really depends on how cold it is how much you're using hot water and what kind of wood you're burning but generally right now I've just been coming out about twice a day if I put a really big log in there right in the center that thing will burn in there for a few days and I'll just add some little ones around the edges you can pack the thing super full and probably only come out once a day when it's super cold outside probably two to three times a day you'll need to come out and add wood to it so that's just my best estimate it's only been as cold as about 35 or 34 at night here in October and so you know we haven't really tested it down below zero yet but I'll let you guys know if there's any update on that so but as always guys I really appreciate you watching if you're interested in sustainable and farming and any type of do-it-yourself kind of stuff that's what we do here so please subscribe to the channel and follow along we've got a whole range of things that we we put videos out on this channel I'd love to have you guys tag along so pit thumbs up on the video if you can guys and as always thanks for watching have a good one you and

Outdoor Wood Burner Tour – How does this thing work?
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45 thoughts on “Outdoor Wood Burner Tour – How does this thing work?

  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Your dog is cool.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Everything is bunched up in that utility closet!! Idk if that’s code but when you change things space everything around and to be safe dedicate a room for all that and give things space so you can service everything with ease .. I had the same problem with my home where the previous owner Jerry ridged everything like that and I changed everything around and dedicated room for all house hold utility’s etc and it made my life so much better and easier and I live in the northern part of New York State and our winters get pretty cold lol

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    We're building a new house and i absolutely want one of these. What stage of building would you think i should have it put in?

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Could you use one of these for back up heat and still have a regular furnace

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    let see you make a viedo of you filling your boilder full of wood

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Just watched your video, thanks.
    I am in northern Ontario and just bought and installed a Heatmaster 7000.
    I am heating my 2800 sq ft log home and a 1800 sq ft shop, plus my house hot water.
    It's only a month old, and it is using soooo much wood.
    I am on 100 acres of mostly pines, and have been burning that, mixed with some cherry and elm.
    Seems to burn ok.
    I am told it will burn anything, and has a coal timer on it, if coal was available……
    My question is, can I set the water temp to 150-160?
    It was at 180 and using wood like crazy.
    If it is just a matter of creosote build up, it can be cleaned.
    Thanks in advance, your video was informative.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    do you fill it up pack as much wood as you can

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    What do you mean you people

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    How close can I install the outdoor unit to my house? Can I push it up against my house?

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Did you ever hook your circulation pump up to solar. Did you make a video of that?

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    That thing would draw so much better by increasing the chimney height

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    I want one. One of my friends out here in Newton County, Ar might be able to sell me his Japanese model. Right now my buildings have no heat except for one Kodiak wood burning stove. I want to heat the floors & do not like propane. I think I could put this between the two buildings which probably rest 100 feet apart. I'll measure for certainty. How is the water kept hot in the pipes in transport? I want to shop around before I commit to the Japanese model also. What are your suggestions?

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBnIxtTZryY&feature=player_embedded
    seems to use a lot of wood ,how often must you feed this monster ? please

    just some ideas for you keep safe paul

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Seems this system depends on electric to run pumps. What happens if the power goes out in a storm for a week or two?

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    I have a wood Doctor out door wood boiler and I’m having trouble with it over heating. It’s -10 , I’ve added maybe 4 logs and the boiler over heated and started boiling at the top.. my thermostat is set at 170. Any idea what could be wrong?

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    I'm currently purchasing a home in central Indiana, that has a Hawken wood burning boiler. I hope there is plenty of content on your channel from which I can learn. It's not free, I'm spending a years worth of propane on chainsaws, and other log-processing equipment 🙂

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    https://youtu.be/9mkF5gI3bQo

    This video shows you to properly hook up your domestic hot water. The way yours is hooked up now it is running into a heat block as heat rises and the way yours is hooked up the hot water just Stops when it hits the vertical pipe as it should into the storage tank sideways about 12 inches from the top. To fix it you will need a new replacement domestics hot water tank to efficiently heat your domestic hot water.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    its a 175 gallon boiler.  That's what the 175 is on the front.  there is a 250 and a couple other sizes also.  I have the same one and love it!!

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Just got a house with one of these and this helps a lot. I was particularly confused by the plumbing on mine, which seems to be the same setup you have.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Needs a taller chimney.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Hey, I'm from the Kalamazoo area and with as cold as it has been this winter how often are you filling it with wood? Thanks!

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Love this And Pleasure Seeing Great details. Its Beautiful Brother.. Bless Up

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Really cool. How about humidity? Any humidity created by blowing air over the exchanger?

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    I just moved out to the country in Eastern PA – bought an old stone farmhouse on 5 acres with a barn and it has one of these beasts. First time i'd ever seen one and was intimidated to try to use it so I've been using the old oil burner. My system is almost identical other than the house furnace is a radiator system so the wood furnace goes through the oil furnace hot water exchange. Thanks for posting the video! I learned some stuff and will likely give this a try soon!

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    i'm always hearing banjo type of music in videos like this lol… we should do a "music over" on these videos with some hard rock or even gangster rap, just to spice it up a bit!

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Great video, very helpful information. I have one on my new farm, but have been too nervous to fire it up for the first time.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Very interesting stuff. I didn't care for the end, though.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Can I burn tires in an outdoor wood burner

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    if your circulating pump only came on when your furnace fan came on you would use less wood. i made mine work that way.what a differance

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    i wonder if you were to build a room say 20 x25 around that you would keep it warmer and get even more time on your burns, plus you could have a hot tub room maybe a den, or game room too…

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    does the fire go out if say you hit warm days?? how does it re light, is there a gas lighter in there??

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    are you thinking of baseboards heat or maybe some wall hung radiation? ? i like central ac but i hate hot air..

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Airborne All the Way! Great channel brother. Very informative. We are finishing our homestead and have a 1,000 Gal propane tank for our standby generator… I'm not sure if it makes sense for us to install an outdoor wood burner, but there are some here in NC.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Wow, some building code ya have there Ehh!

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Great video. I'm curious as to why the circulation pump runs 24/7 and not just when needed ? Think there would be a way for the thermostat on the furnace and hot water tank to activate the circulation pump.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    damn not even a good try at plumbing that in? i like the theory! nice system.
    maybe a back up circ pump on hand or in line already ?any safety for melt down or alarm?

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Regarding redoing the heat in the house, look for and grab any old cast iron radiators. Some will be cracked that won't show up till you hook up to water and apply pressure, the ones that don't leak get installed and will heat your house very nicely. If you can swing it install a oil or propane fired boiler as a backup unless your going to be there every day to feed the owb. If you don't install an oil/propane boiler then you use a solenoid valve that are commonly used on hot water heating systems. To open the hot water supply too the radiators to warm the house up. Make up a cover out of steel for the radiators first encountered when you walk in the front or rear door with hooks to hang jackets over the radiator to melt the snow and ice and have a nice warm jacket to put on before you walk out the door.

    Food for thought.

    🙂

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    I want one, no more splitting

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Did yu thought about adding a longer exhuast stack to help reduce the smoke out the top

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    If i may suggest try reading on the peltier effect for electricity perhaps in combination with solar, It is a thermoelectric generator that works best the greater the difference is between temperatures, Could work well especially in the winter.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Thanks for explaining this. They are not very common here in SW KS, but I've seen a couple. Always wanted one, said we'd get one when our Lennox propane furnace died. Been waiting for over 30 yrs LOL

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    Living in the South I have never seen an outside would burner nor do I fully understand how much wood it consumes. Will you have enough wood on your property? Sorry for my ignorance but in FL we don't need this sort of equipment. It looks real cool.

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    I want to buy your dog!

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  • June 1, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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    just wondering. How are you going to replace your well tank and water heater if/when  they need it?

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