the temporalis muscle is located right here on both sides. If you clench your teeth you can feel the muscle contract. The job of this muscle is to close your jaw. It aids in side-to-side motion and also helps retract your mouth. If we have a referred pain with this muscle it’s over the eye. It can be around the teeth or it can be local pain. A cause for this injury or irritation is excessive chewing (chewing gum), a head forward posture, clenching our teeth, or being hit in the muscle and thus injuring and making it more sensitive. In my practice what I do is I use Active Release or acupuncture to assist in this but in between treatments I suggest my patients use their own self myofascial method to help release this muscle. Let’s take a look at how to perform this exercise. I’m going to take this ball, I going to find a tender spot in that muscle. For me, there’s actually one right there. I’m going to push down pinning the muscle down. I’m not crushing. it I’m just pushing down trying to hold it down a bit and then what I do is I open my mouth up and I can feel the tension develop. If I want to get a little bit more I can keep them keep the pin and draw my draw the ball away from its insertion and because this muscle fans out in a fan I can go in any direction to feel where I can get a little bit more tension so I push push down draw and I can feel my tension there and that’s how you perform self myofascial release cue temporalis muscle

Myofascial release of the temporalis muscle – Dr Notley WInnipeg Chiropractor and Athletic Therapist

3 thoughts on “Myofascial release of the temporalis muscle – Dr Notley WInnipeg Chiropractor and Athletic Therapist

  • April 27, 2019 at 7:26 am
    Permalink

    That's a really nice video, I have been diagnosed with my right temporalis muscle being bulky 7 months ago. It's still bulky and sometimes it feels weird, doesn't really ache but this feeling is annoying. I did an MRI then saw a neurologist and he said that's it due to the fact that I am too tense. I am looking for a way to treat this and this might be the way.

    Reply
  • April 27, 2019 at 11:35 am
    Permalink

    Does this treatment reduce the size of the temporalis muscle?

    Reply
  • October 6, 2019 at 7:38 pm
    Permalink

    Mine flare up in the cold weather, or anytime a cold breeze hits. For the past 20 years I've had steroid nerve block injections on both sides of my head. The pain is horrific and for me, it only subsides with the injections. 🙁 i'm having a consult for botox injections this next week, but am really nervous about the concept of botox. It's a real catch-22.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *