guy Hetherington here again for all tracks Academy with some more ideas on how to improve your free scheme today we'll be taking a detailed look at what is arguably one of the most important moves in all of skiing so let's check it out when we get to the stage where we're looking to increase the speed of our off-piste skiing we need to be prepared to deal with varying degrees of terrain undulation the faster we go in bumpy or undulating terrain the faster the ground will appear to rise and fall beneath our feet and how we deal with this idea is a major key to entering into the advanced or expert realm so let's take a look at how this can play out in a simple straight run before we put it into our turns so here we are one of Whistler Blackcomb terrain based learning centers and I'm going to perform a straight run through a few of these man-made rollers notice how I approach the first roller in a very tall and upright position but then allow the roller to push my legs up towards my chest as I pass over it the ultimate goal is to absorb a series of these rollers entirely with our legs while our head remains as level as possible throughout its journey if your resort does not provide terrain features like this go out and find yourself a natural roller to practice this move upon once you are comfortable allowing your body to compress from the ground upwards take this move on to the groomers and place it in between some turns but now instead of the terrain forcing your feet up towards you let the pressure of the turn do exactly the fames pick the timing of your compression is critical here notice how I'm in my most compact position directly between one term and the next as my skis are completely flat to the snow because only as the new term begins that I allow my legs to extend out to the side so take that and work on it for a while once you have it down come back for part two of this video where I'll show you how to apply this move in the bumps and over a variety of different terrain scenarios

Most Important Move in Skiing (Part 1): Alltracks Academy
Tagged on:                                                                     

39 thoughts on “Most Important Move in Skiing (Part 1): Alltracks Academy

  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    To be onest, if you wanna really use your ski for curving you have to do the opposite movement: press the leg wenn you are in the max slope point and extend them between the two curv (sorry for my bad english, that's not my language)

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    I THINK THIS IS HORRIBLE ADVICE, here is why: if you do that, you are killing all the rebound energy from side to side, which will be exhausting. And you are reducing severely the 'small window" of opportunity you have to find footing and let it push/propel yourself to the otherside going back and forth, you are destroying angulation. Plus you are also thirdly killing your 'speed control', you can ski like that if you want, but it won't be as enjoyable or efficient. YOu'll be skiing FLAT instead of 3D.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    His legs are too close together

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    In all regards . . . head up, looking down the hill at ALL times

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    I was an intermediate skier. All I know is I started using this technique & my turns & carving have greatly improved including much more control & power in my turns. The funny thing is its pretty simple to do. Thanks Guy!

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Until tonight, I never compared the two types of turns that are apparently promoted. I like the way your turns look and it makes sense, but currently, I’m turning like this. https://youtu.be/LUNEuKL0GaU

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    oh hellllll nah

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Can’t stand instructor turns….Grip it and rip it!

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks for the great video. And those who compare this technique with how they work on the slope at the World Cup are idiots.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    This is an interesting teaching technique but I don't understand why you would entirely ignore pole planting. Proper pole planting form is essential for downhill, mogul and especially steep terrain skiing. Teaching an aggressive forward pole plant — and getting people accustomed to not leaving their arms out at their sides or starting to plant late in the turn is an important component of proper ski form and I find it's one of the least mentioned in lessons.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    The single most important "Move" in skiing, is Not moving your upper body from your kneecaps up when you want to start the next turn. Keep your upper body very quiet and vertical as you change your weight from one foot to the other. This will allow you to be automatically balanced on the arch of your turning ski. Without that statue like quietness, you will be all over the place.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    You're a badass skier Guy!

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    It looks more like a slalom race tecnique than carving…

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Excellent 2 part video, Guy. It would be useful if some of the critical posters had watched part 2 as well. Good luck to anyone extending (ie lengthening) their legs as they hit a mogul with a bit of speed on steep terrain. Probably going to result in a low earth orbit. And a problematic re-entry.
    What Guy is doing in the vertical on the rollers and bumps (ie flexing on the upside and extending into the downside) is being replicated on the groomer turns with a key difference. In those groomer turns the leg extension is lateral (ie to the side) instead of vertical since the lower body is much more inclined.
    In both situations the upper body remains quite stable. Which is kind of the point. Again, good luck to anyone trying to retain balance and control in the bumps if their upper body is not stable. Yes, Guy does bend at the waist – I suspect he's a tall person and he's making good use of all joints (ankles, knees, waist) to maintain his center of mass over his feet. And probably emphasizing that flex in the rollers as is necessary for instructors doing demos. Go look at the bump skiing in part 2 – no issues there.
    All of the ski race videos confirm Guy's point. Watch their turns slowed down and we see plenty of flex (lots of bent joints) where their skis are flat between gates and then plenty of extension (much straighter joints) as the racer goes through the fall line on the apex of the turn around each gate. There are exceptions where the racer is making a recovery move or dealing with a course feature but in nearly every turn their most extended positions are around the fall line.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Flex to release while holding counter no pivot is needed.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    This skiing is showing a cross under move which looks a bit different than some of your other videos. Were you intentionally emphasizing this for this video?

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    This is a bizarre exercise, keep away. You wanna practice carving by doing the opposite of what you should do to learn suspension technique? No. You have to sink while in the turn to make the skis edges heavy (mainly the outer ski), then you rise to lighten the skis in the transition. Doing what this guy’s doing is exactly backwards, the physics make no sense, and it looks like shit.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    What's the soundtrack??

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Bendz Ze Knees $10 please !

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    He must know what he’s talking about because he sure looks good on the slope

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Which is wrong? Possibly two different styles? Or one way is more optimal? Or one is better for certain terrain? PLS HELP

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUNEuKL0GaU&t=348

    Versus this video at 1:51

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    at 2:00 it’s the complete opposite of what it’s supposed to be 😂

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Better watch some world cup giant slalom and see they do the opposite. It is a quick up after the end of a turn in the transition then move to the outside ski and extend the leg to stack the body. The skeleton is stronger than the muscles.
    The transition in slalom often brings the legs under the body after the turn as there is less time for up and down movement due to the quickness between the turns

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    that is very nice, but whatever I do my inside leg refuses to turn.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    I like how your demo shows the late in the turn edge initiation expected of skiers at this level.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Very poor form. He is collapsing over his legs, bending at the hip. The pelvis should be rotated back, the flex should start at the ankles to keep weight forward and progress through the knees, this gives much larger range of motion while keeping the torso erect. Just watch any good bump or slalom skier. Why teach it wrong and then have to relearn later.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    If i ski ilke this one day, i will quit skiing 🙂

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Looking good Guy! Nice videos, quality content and ski instructor course refreshers 🙂 Hope you're keeping well.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    An interesting concept Guy. When doing our CSIA LV1 course, a tactic for beginners is to be ‘tall and small’ helping turn initiation. This being tall to start the turn (more range of movement whilst extended) and small within the turn (to gain balance). Should this concept be altered when teaching beginners? Or should we stick with it and later on tell clients this concept evolves to your video here, which seems like you are extended mid-turn and flexed to initiate the turn?

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    really like your thinking and instruction here, using terrain, knowing snow, …. many forget or even think about this. Good examples and terminology (highpoints) …. clear and concise

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    "most important move in skiing"……………the day you move to a ski town!

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    Bill wrote already this move is a key to PMTS skiing – nonetheless, glad you are making it so clear here!

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    By far, the best ski training videos on the net. Superb content, excellent to the point explanation (love your enthusiasm) and brilliant production. I have used several of your drills to improve my skiing. Brilliant skier, powerful at the right time, yet super smooth. Thank-you***

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    This is an excellent video! It clearly describes and demonstrates the movements required to end one turn and start another (releasing the old edges to the new) through flexing (taught by PMTS) as opposed to extending to release (taught by CSIA). This movement can and should be normally used in all skiing, bumps, powder, groomers, high speed GS and salmon turns, etc. One other movement integral to the flexing movement which is also happening in this video is tipping. By tipping, I mean the rolling of the bottom of the feet and therefore the skis from one set of edges to the other. Therefore combine the tipping of the edges from the old edges to the new edges while flexing to release rather than extending to release. Those two movements will improve your skiing dramatically.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *