24 thoughts on “Modern vs Traditional Snowshoes

  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    With the 16" width, do you ever have issues with your snowshoes hitting each other? Or what width do you think you would have issues with that?

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    yup, just got a set of modern shoes today. i'm sinkin in much further than anticipated and the binding mechanisms froze and didn't want to release. glad i tried them at home so i know what to expect when i take them up north. it may be obvious to some but idk, it's all new to me but now i know why most modern shoes are shown on packed ground or spring conditions.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Seems like this would be a good video if I can hear what you're saying I can barely make out

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    You cannot compare modern with traditional due to the fact that newer snowshoes are geared towards alpine and harder packed/icy conditions.

    Try descending a steep grade on the traditionals with a load on your back.

    This is pretty much a waste of comparison because the 2 are designed to excel in different areas.

    As stated here by others myAtlas Serattes have a climbing bar.

    There is no way in hell I would take a traditional shoe for ascending or descending and if you say you would then you are clueless.

    Seems to me you are very biased and very limited to the conditions in which you have utilized these snowshoes in.

    It's the equivalent of saying a 3 season tent sucks in winter.

    No shit.

    Its not designed for winter just as you are saying a conventional snowshoe doesnt work super well in deep pow.

    I've placed my feet all over the globe and have been doing so for north of 30yrs.

    It's common sense a wider shoe does better in deep pow and a newer model does well in alpine conditions.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    I love your channel but the volume on this isn't listenable. Don't use the camera microphones they are horrible.
    curious how come you didn't use a traditional snowshoe roughly the same size (like a Green mountain type) as the new one…? You have more apples and oranges here.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    I use the old military issue magnesium snow shoes they only weigh 1/2 pound more than lightest modern ones and the new ones have a tendency to post hole thru deep snow when wearing a pack the military ones are wider and stay on top of snow better they have a long rear tail which also serves as a handle to shovel snow out and to stick in the snow to keep them visible and ready

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Yup, I'll stay with my old wood Tubbs. I have seen many modern aluminum shoes broken.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    I will take traditional materials any day. Bought the a new pair of modern shoes. Lasted one year and the plastic straps broke. Can't beat Mother Nature!

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Traditional won at about 2:20 for me!

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    I like traditional.

    HOWEVER, modern snowshoes can use modular, clamp on floation accesories. So you can increase surface area AS NEEDED! That means you can have MAXIMUM EFFICIENCY on packed snow with a smaller, lighter shoe, and add the modular sections on softer snow! Comparing against those would be a fair comparison!

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Do you have a video of bushcrafting a pair?

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    i love my gv blizzards they are 10×36" and float like my canoe plus not too heavy either and the deep tooth crampon comes handy unless snow is really sticky. they are by no means high end but sure get me around algonquin and places without breaking the bank.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    My two cents: I had Atlas 830 s like 15 years agomy 1st shoe! They lasted for rec. but surveying in the interior barely lasted 1 season…. you can't wrap that material over the bars it wears and tears …. my large Sherpas were the best ever made! Unfortunately the belonged to the company, but my new similar build Article Trekkers, who took over Sherpa are great! I averaged around 8-10km of busting trail in the hard interior terrain of BC for over ten years that's a lot of clicks, traditional shoes serve a specific purpose and are super cool for open lakes rivers but not in the woods. Crampons are critical in bush work , up down gullies or preventing sliding down a mountain and fending of wolves. Sticky snow can be annoying but trekkers have designers a sharper smaller more open crampons to prevent it . I've trained and worked with a lot of ppl with a lot of different snowshoes and they all ended up switching over to trekkers. I've put a lot miles on them and looking to out many more back here in the east. Big fan of all your doing keep up the great work and stay warm!

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Different purpose/conditions. Like comparing winter tires vs summer tires. Those modern MSR shoes are designed for Pacific Northwest concrete snow/ice. For hiking steep mountains and icy slopes. We don't get fluffy dry snow here. Sounds like you are in a location that gets very deep and powdery snow, obviously better to have a traditional style shoe for those conditions. But when you are on a 40° slope with 5" of slush and ice underneath, your traditional shoes, and tubes modern shoes, are going to turn in toboggans as you slide downhill.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    I am looking for traditional snowshoes for east coast snow, usually wet rather than dry. They will mainly be used in the woods but with very little underbrush, but occasionally on wide trails with some hills. I am a bigger guy, 6' 5" 240# what shape and size do you suggest for me? Because we only get infrequent snow they will likley be used just two or three times a year, a day or two in a row. Thanks for any suggestions.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Great video which helped me make up my mind about purchasing traditional snowshoes. I've snowshoed in modern snowshoes and have not been happy with the results. We're the boots worn in the video a type of mukluk?

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Excellent video. I was wondering what the difference was. Thanks for posting this. I do find the crampons are good for climbing in steep country.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Got some traditional looking snow shoes. surplus? They came with a webbing for my shoes. Two piece. I cannot figure out how to attach them? Any ideas or links? Dan

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Looking at the size difference and using your head could have saved 7 minutes of viewing the obvious. I've been snowshoeing for 30 years, started out with modified bear paws, and now use modern shoes. I find them to be superior in almost every condition, with the exception being deep, dry, fluffy snow in open terrain. Snow in the east isn't as dry as the stuff out west and in the far north, and generally consolidates relatively quickly. Even in fresh snow my 10"x36" Tubbs Mountaineers don't sink more than 6-8 inches with 300+ pounds of me and my pack, occasionally going to the knee if I step on or next to a buried shrub. They also give traction for climbing hills and work on crusted snow thanks to the crampons, which traditional shoes don't. My 8"x30" MSR Lightning Ascents are optimized for more packed snow in mountainous or steep terrain, with a frame that provides traction, 3 transverse traction bars, and 2 big toe crampons, but still do well in softer snow. I often find them to be easier to use than the Tubbs because while they may sink deeper they're easier to lift out, being smaller. They also give much better traction in late season, wet, "mashed potatoes" snow than tubular-framed or traditional snowshoes do. I just ordered a pair of GV Wide Trail 12"x42" and am looking forward to trying them out.

    Now, if I was in the far north, where the land was flat or open, I'd use traditional snowshoes with the most surface area. I'd also wear mukluks instead of Sorels, because liquid water doesn't exist for most of the winter up there. But in most snowy areas of the lower 48 a good modern snowshoe, sized appropriately for your weight, will do better. Maybe some day I'll pick up a set of Iverson 10x72s or something similar.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Modern shoes are good around the house and are durable, but if I'm doing any sort of winter hunting/camping I'm bringing traditional shoes. The surface area really makes a big difference and from my experience modern shoes with 60+lbs of gear sink way to far for my liking.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Wow! Thanks for that great demo. I was just planning to buy snowshoes and was looking at all the modern brands. I was suspicious about the modern designs but really didn't know for sure. Definitely going with the traditional snowshoes now after seeing your demo. The proof is definitely in the pudding. I was shocked at the difference!

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    My traditional 13 X 46 Iverson snowshoes work great.  At 57 years of age; I'd rather huff & puff walking more so on top of the snow; rather than through it. lol   Good info on your video.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Its pretty logical. Regardless of what you wear, the experience will always be affected by your weight and the way you walk. Some people are light footed, like a cat. Some people walk like they have concrete blocks on their feet. Either way, the wider the shoe, the more weight that can be distributed across the surface. I think the modern shoes are more for smaller people with less weight. Small women and children particularly. But that is off course affected by the way they walk. Most people would need the bigger ones unless they want to be marching when they walk. I personally like to feel like I am walking on a beach at least. And the traditional ones make that easy.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    They both are just as good, it all just depends on what terrain you're going to be hiking on.

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