in the past a lot of time it was done by height so you know if you were this tall he would take a pair of ski to your wrist so that is still somewhat being done and put your weight on one ski you wanna be able to compress this ski and if you can't compress the ski you're not going to be able to move forward from your stride from one ski to the next so the most important factor when you're choosing a cross-country ski is choosing a ski that's right for your weight and the best way to do that is to go into a shop that knows how to test skis properly now whether you're buying a maximal or non-taxable ski that's still quite important so here we're going to take a walk scible ski and test test a skier or test a personal in these skis just to see if they're the white right weight range and I'll demonstrate basically how to do that and also how to how to choose whether the ski is going to have this race sort of flex rating on it so here we have Elana standing on our skis or you down the balance point then for testing the skis again best thing to do is to take it to a shop that that's professional with fitting and has a board that's designed for this a flat board you don't want to do this on a cement floor your kitchen table because cement floors aren't flat and then you need to use your kitchen table okay so what we're going to do is we usually use for cold snow conditions about a 0.15 millimeter gauge and so we're gonna get lamb or 0.15 centimeter gauge and we're gonna get Lana to stand on here and basically we put this pewter gauge under this ski and you're gonna feel for you're gonna go forward and then you're gonna go back and you want to do that on both skis to make sure it's pretty even on both skis sometimes if it's a little bit different you could have a couple different factors you couldn't have a discrepancy in ski flexes but nowadays with the skis are computerized tested before they're matched up most of the time it could quite often be the skier is not standing correctly on the skis you could have somebody with the leg length discrepancy they could have a sore back so they're not standing evenly so the best thing to do there or what we do there is we would switch the skis and see if that is consistent with what we found earlier so in this case here if you see here where our test lines here it's about 30 centimeters and Lana's foot and to the back of the heel so usually with the ski if you divide this ski into three sections you want about a third of the ski off the snow so if you look at the ski here so these are the hash marks right here so this is sort of the forward zone about where it should be for that ski to basically fit that ski or well in a cold snow condition ski so if we move it back it's just about to the back of the heel and if we go forward you can see just barely into that zone so this ski basically is not going to be quite stiff enough for Lana so I'm gonna grab another pair here that we're gonna chuck on the board and then we'll just below the test as well so right now we're kind of in the middle of his own so there's the back of the lines on the front and there's the front of line so that's a pretty good range right there so about a third the ski which is above what we want for a classic cold temperature ski now the next thing you want to be able to test so that's going to be the area where you're gonna put your grip wax and when your weight is evenly on both skis you want that area off the snow or off the board so that's where you're gonna apply your grip or your sticky wax to help you move forward now the other key is in order for you to be able to move forward is you need to be able to compress the ski and push that wax down onto the snow to move forward so the next thing we're gonna do is we're gonna put the feeler gauge underneath basically the ball of your foot and we're gonna get Atlanta to put all her weight on the right foot okay and then just kind of come up on the ball of your foot so your weights forward okay so you should be able to compress that ski there okay so that's quite good right there okay try that again so you want to be able to compress that ski okay there we go so here we are testing some non wax keys we have Elana one of our staff standing on two different skis so basically I picked our 190 centimeters ski in 180 198 centimeters ski in a non lack ski being that with the fish scales on the bottom so you're not going to be clocked I'm flying in a grip blast so what I've done here is pick two different ski so two different flexes to find it which ski suits her I can weight better so basically when we test this ski we still want to do the same flat board that we're going to be using for testing maximal skis but when you're testing maximal skis you're going to be using a feeler gauge we tend to use just two basically a slip of paper for doing an arm Lac ski and I'll explain that from in a second here so with the non wack ski it's not as text and technical as with a wax or skis for as a grip zone goes but we still want to have a couple of consistent conditions here so when I slide this piece of paper forward here underneath the ski and then slide it forward it basically want to get pretty much 1/3 of the ski off the snow again – ok and if we look in the bottom of the ski you're gonna see that grip zone on the bottom of the ski so you want to try and get that grip zone off the snow when you're off the board when you're testing it with the paper so now I'm going to slide this paper underneath this ski and a slide it forward and I slide it back you can see basically this is the area that's off the snow which is not a very long stretch so if we get landed just to step off this one ski for a second ok so if I take that area now I flip this ski over you can see in the grips on your the front area we've almost gotten out of that area with her without area being off the Y off the board off the snow but you can see in the back here that this this section here is going to be dragging into the valley on the ski on the snow so that would kind of indicate that this ski is probably gonna be a little bit soft we will do one more test here we're going to Lana to put all her weight on the left ski here and just kind of bring the weight up on the ball here but ok so that ski she's the ski is soft enough for her to compress but in this situation I would probably say we should go to a little bit of a stiffer ski because she get better glide now if this person's gonna be skiing in conditions where it's not a set track it's not machine groomed trails what the snow is going to be soft and not compressed this might be the more suitable ski to go with but if you're gonna be skiing on on tracks with the snow is packed harder I would say this ski is gonna be too soft so we're just gonna grab a little bit longer ski here the Ford range on this ski goes to there and on the back we're going right to the back of the foot so you can see in this one here the back range on this ski is a little bit better than it was on the first ski so that indicates that obviously it's a little bit stiffer than that back area this skis not going to be dragging on the snow okay so this ski I'd say it's probably more suitable than the first parent now we're gonna get a LAN of the step paper on this side we're gonna get a lander to step on the right foot and going up front of the ball of her foot you can see lots of pressure on the ski same thing on that left foot perfect bang on that's gonna be the right speed for a ladder okay so there is a compilation between height the height of the skier and the length of this ski but it's more important about the weight of the ski or the weight of this gear on the skis need to do this test to be able to choose the skis properly

McBike explains how to select the correct length of xc ski
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8 thoughts on “McBike explains how to select the correct length of xc ski

  • July 31, 2019 at 7:02 pm
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    Nice upload…Very helpful, thanks! Best wishes and good luck from new freind..

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  • July 31, 2019 at 7:02 pm
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    I believe there are actually two factors to look at, namely: 1)the inherent stiffness of the ski, as determined by its design (materials and construction) and 2) the length of the ski. Some skis of the same length but different brands can have a different camber (e.g. double camber with distinct wax pocket) in terms of how high the skier is off the ground and how much force it takes to compress it. Some newer designs allow for shorter, more maneuverable skis, than older more traditional designs. But in any case, the method you use to find the right pair is good. The length and thickness of the kick wax cab also make a big difference. I like Madshus for its low and long camber design.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 7:02 pm
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    You know your stuff – thanks for you time

    Reply
  • July 31, 2019 at 7:02 pm
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    Im going to learn to ski for a expedition pulling a pulk sled what type is best for me?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 7:02 pm
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    Thanks for the awesome video, helped me a lot! I have a question though. How would you fit skin-based skis like the Salomon Aero 9 or the Rossignol R-Skin? The ones I looked at were very tight, even paper was hard to go through, even with a very light person on top of skis that were meant for heavy persons. Thanks!

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  • July 31, 2019 at 7:02 pm
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    so professional with the paper πŸ˜› lol great video tho!

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  • July 31, 2019 at 7:02 pm
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    these are classic skis

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