hey guys welcome back to the shop today I'm going to show you how to make this table saw miter sled that I think it looks an awful lot like a b-2 stealth bomber so no there's so ago I put out a video on how I made my crosscut sled and in that one I discussed a bunch of the options that you have when picking out the runners that you want to go on the underside of your sled that help it track back and forth inside the miter slots on the table saw top smoothly and without wearing out over time so if you haven't seen that video you probably want to go back and watch that because we're not going to cover it again here because at the time I knew I was going to be making the second sled so I cut a second set of runners so let's just jump right into the build if you need to refresh yourself on that one I'll leave a link and you can go back to that I used washers in the miter slots to hold the plastic runners up just above the surface of the table saw the only material in this project other than the runners is some 3/4 inch MDF I just cut an 18 inch section off a full sheet then cut that again at 30 inches the big piece makes up the base of the sled and the leftover piece is turned into the fence I clamped large speed square to the table saw fence to help me line up the base of the sled it's not really important to the function of the sled to have the base be precise but it goes a long ways towards making the miter fence precise when we get to that step later on I know to the table saw fence over until the point of the base was in line with the saw blade with everything lined up I used a countersink bit to drill pilot holes through the base and into the runners then I drove in several screws to lock the runners in place I used a hand saw to trim the runners this isn't exactly necessary I just think it looks better alright guys now before we go any further I want to tell you about the sponsor of today's video and that's Acme tools now the main reason why I'm having to rebuild my miter sled is because this year I upgraded from a small jobsite table saw to this big cabinet style saw now you can actually see my last miter sled up there and that fit the old small jobsite saw and it won't fit on the new one now the interesting thing about both of the table saws that I've owned up until this point is that they're both on Acme tools list of the best table saws of 2018 that doesn't mean that all of them have come out in 2018 it means that all of the best saws that you could buy this year are on this list my Dewalt jobsite saw I bought long before the list came out and it happened to be on there still and then when I upgraded I actually consulted that list did a bunch of research and ended up with the saw stop saw so if you are in the market for a new table saw I'll leave a link down in the description over to the blog on Acme tools website so that you can see that list for yourself and see what one of those saws might actually fit your budget and your needs and you're gonna learn a lot in a short amount of time that way at this point I'm moving on to the fence I want to point out that this technique for making a fence is definitely not an original idea on my part I got the idea from a video William ng put out called two cuts to a perfect miter sled I'll outline the steps here briefly but if you want to see Williams very detailed explanation I'll leave a link in the description I used my crosscut sled to make one perfect 90-degree corner then I set my table saw fence to 15 inches and cut the two opposite edges down to size this left me with a perfect square next I set my fence to 3 inches and cut most of the way along one side then I flipped the board over and did the same thing to the perpendicular edge I moved over to the bandsaw to finish the cuts and I was left with an l-shaped piece that had a perfect 90 degree point back at the sled base I drew a reference line that would be perpendicular to the saw blade then I lined up a scrap piece with a perfectly straight edge and screwed one side down I grabbed my biggest square and referenced it off the table saw fence then pivoted the scrap piece and screwed down the other end once it was perfectly square I put the back points of the miter fence up against the scrap piece and lined the front point up with the leading point of the base I screwed the fence to the base temporarily knowing that I would be fine-tuning it in a minute I made a test piece that had a perfect 90-degree corner then I cut that corner off and carefully labeled all the important components I measured both sides of my new triangle and that would tell me exactly how far away from perfect my fence was all right I'm not even gonna pretend that I can explain to you what's going on here in this step because math and numbers just aren't friends of mine truth be told I actually struggled with this step quite a bit but in the end I did come out with a more accurate miter fence when I was all done so rather than me trying to fight my way through and pretend that I know what I'm saying just make sure you go down to the link in the description and go check out Williams video where he does a much better job of explaining this than I ever could innocence Williams formula will tell you precisely how far you need to move your fence in order for it to be perfect after a little struggling I got mine exactly right I made a little test frame to see how well it worked and man those miter joints are far superior to anything I've been able to achieve up until now so I put a few more screws in the fence to lock it in place for good so as of right now this thing is actually set up perfectly and ready to go to work except for one little thing when I slide it back far enough to get the blade in front of the workpiece it's massively back heavy and it wants to fall right out of the track so you're actually expending a lot of energy just trying to keep this flat on the table the thing is we really only need this surface this surface and then the two runners so there is a ton of stuff in here that's just weight towards the back that's useless wasted real-estate so the next thing we're going to do is kind of mark out what we can just hack out of this and throw away because there's no reason to have it be this tippy on the infeed side of the blade so the same paper that I just glued on here is actually an old remnant piece from a belt that broke on my drum sander and it works really well to keep that kind of stuff around so that you can hack it up and use it for jigs like this and in this case it adds a lot of grip because I'm smooth MDF your work piece is just gonna slide around a lot but on top of that sandpaper it's not going anywhere so so that's safer it's a lot more precise to use it that way and that really about wraps this up I want to say a huge thank you to Acme tools for supporting my channel and for sponsoring this video and I also want to encourage you to go down into the links in the descriptions and check out Acme tools blog and William Angie's post about miter sleds because I took a lot of my inspiration from him I'm also going to include a link to david pachoo tows miter sled which is fairly picture and painting specific but he's got a lot of really good ideas in there too and I really think that's about all I've got to say so thank you guys for checking this one out and we'll see you next time

Making A Table Saw Miter Sled – Getting Precise Corners
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23 thoughts on “Making A Table Saw Miter Sled – Getting Precise Corners

  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    It makes me really nervous to see the draw-strings of your hoodie hanging down around a table saw, even though you didn't ever run the saw. I know it's a Saw Stop, and would shut off when your face got pulled into the blade, but it still looks really wrong to me. Otherwise, great video.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Are you still doing an A – B style of cutting miters to cancel out angles, or just going off the one perfect side?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    William is good eh? your honesty over the numbers is refreshing, me like! None of us get everything right, seeing that others can overcome issues is great. Any day when you learn something new is a good day.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Do you by chance have plans for the table you used for your old contractor job site table saw? Love your videos!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Thanks for the video Mark! I haven’t yet seen William Ng’s video on that technique, so thanks for that! I’ve made two miter sled variations and not been thrilled with their accuracy. Maybe I’ll try again! My SawStop jobsite saw has very little infeed in front of the blade, so I‘ll need to plan for longer runners.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Plzz make Resin filled 8 Ball pool stik

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Great build i love these jig videos, and like you i hated Maths in school. Since watching woodworking videos, it's amazing how much Maths there is in woodworking.
    Barry (ENG)

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    FYI, Acme Tools link doesn't work.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Great vid, and yes… math is hard

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    good tip with the sandpaper, guess we'll see some new photo frames soon

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Great video, Mark!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Super simple…I love it! I guess I kind of call bs on the sandpaper being THAT effective. 😉 But then again, I've never used it. I like how you thought through removing some of the back of the sled, so it would not tip off the saw. Brilliant!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    @Gunflint Designs
    Just FYI, William Ng's last name is pronounced like the last "ING" of "nothING". Have a great one bro, peace

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Great video. The only variance I see is you must make sure that your saw fence and blade is perfectly aligned with the saw. Thanks

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Galvanized elbow on the wood stove pipe is ………. a no-no-never do it ………………..

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    I love the fact that you made a table saw accessory that fancy. Great video man

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    I laughed out loud at the Math Warning! Love to see new jig videos and seeing you link to the other guys' videos all the time. Gives a real sense of community and appreciation for your fellow woodworkers/youtubers. Keep it up!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Great video! 👍🏽

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    4:49 is so satisfying… 🙂

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Great build, Mark. I built David P's version a year or so ago. The sliding stop block and tape measure work great, but it's just a tiny bit off (my fault, not DP's), so wider frames aren't crisp. William Ng's video was great, and made me want to build another, but I didn't want a big beefy sled again. Yours is a great, sleek hybrid – I will be stealing it, so thanks for the video! (Do you plan on adding a stop block to yours for repeatable cuts?)

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    I love this idea and look forward to making my own version of it which will basically be yours for the most part. Lol

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  • June 17, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    Seems easy enough and should be handy.

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