hey guys welcome back you can see we're not in the shop right now because the heater went out yes the heater that I just put in it so we're filming this in front of the Christmas tree but that's okay cuz it's kind of Christmas themed back when I was a little kid my dad made me this sled and now that I've got two boys of my own I figured I better make a duplicate of it so that they can each have their own so let's see how I did that the process started with taking some clothes measurements of the original sled and sketching out the pieces I decided I wanted to use my x-carve to cut out the different parts so my next step was to draw everything to scale in Adobe Illustrator now you certainly don't need a CNC machine to do this my dad definitely didn't need one back when he built the original so you could easily get all the pieces cut out using a band saw or a jig saw using the x-carve created its own set of challenges which is exactly what I was looking for the most obvious one is that my x-carve has a cutting surface of roughly 30 by 30 inches and the overall length of the sled is 44 inches so I had to come up with a way to split the runners into two pieces that could be glued together later after three different versions and testing on some scrap wood I came up with a funny-looking dovetail joint that I was happy with so I squared up several pieces of rough white oak to match the original sled and set the x-carve to work while the CNC machine kept working in the other room I could take the finished pieces to my bench and cut the tabs and fine-tune some of the edges well we had a little bit of a malfunction unfortunately during the last pass with the x-carve cutting out the seat or the top to the sled the tabs actually broke and the whole piece jumped a little bit and I took a great big gouge out of it I was standing not right there but close enough by that I was able to slap the panic button and get to shut down before it got any worse and it was going to try to just run right through the middle of this thing so this is very unfortunate because this was actually the exact shape that I wanted it to be but that's okay we can get away with fixing this and no one else will know the difference I took and put a radius on each corner using just a five-gallon bucket and set it down on top of there and kind of curve those two out so I'm going to go to the bandsaw to cut those little ears off now and hide this problem forever in the you file that I'll have available the full shape will still be there what I learned from this is that my oak is fairly brittle when it gets that thin and I always knew that and I had extra tabs built into this but what I didn't think about was the thickness of the tabs so in the project file I'm gonna make those tabs thicker also so that there are some real substance holding this in place for that last pass so it doesn't jump loose on anybody else to glue the runners together I put a straightedge in my bench vise to create a fence and put some blue tape down on my workbench that was a little bigger than the joint I spread the glue over all the faces of the dovetails then put the pieces together like a simple puzzle the joint was very accurate coming off the CNC machine but to be doubly sure that the bottom of the runners would be straight I clamped the pieces to the fence that I had set up then I used another clamp and the handhold cutouts to pull the pieces together while the glue dried but what are you doing huh what are you doing you know your ears are so big to cover your eyeballs what is this about you look silly oh I oh oh great now we're gonna have to censor the video you can't flash the whole internet Flint alright alright you goofy dog I gave the runners a light pass through my drum sander just to clean any dried glue off the faces so I could take a closer look at how the joint came out it turned out nice and strong but there were a few small gaps I put a little bit of thick CA glue in the gaps to fill them then sprinkled on some sawdust and rubbed it in to hide it here you can see that I used a chisel to square the corners of these holes the quarter inch bit from the CNC machine left slightly radiused corners and I chose to square these rather than round over the ends of the cross pieces I used the band saw to remove the radius on the inside corner of the cross pieces as well with all of the pieces tuned up I ran them through the drum sander to make them exactly three-quarters of an inch thick and smooth to 220 grit I added a slight bevel to the ends of each cross piece to give them a decorative look that matched to the original sled then I used a small round over bit to soften the top edges of the runners the handhold cutouts and the front and back edges of the seat the last step before assembly was to drill holes for the front handle I plan to do this with the x-carve during the initial cutout but the board's I'm using have one site that is much prettier than the other and I wanted to make sure that the best side was facing out so I waited until this point to make that call but the project file linked below will have these holes already in place there's no glue in putting the pieces together initially I just dry fit everything together and clamped it down then I marked and drilled holes through the top of the seat into each cross piece and through the sides of the runners into the cross pieces as well then I put glue into all the holes and tapped in dowels to anybody out there that's thinking but what about what expansion your sled is just gonna rip itself apart to that I say I don't know maybe just know that that very thought crossed my mind and I decided to see what happened if I just ignored it looking at the original sled my dad made for me it's only held together with screws in these exact same locations no glue whatsoever and it's held up for more than 20 years with the glue dry I used a flush trim saw to cut the dowels even with the yoke then sanded them smooth finally I hung the sled from the ceiling and hit it with a healthy coat of satin polyurethane to finish it off well there we have it guys my old sled and the new version and I'm really happy with how this came out I kind of like the contrast of grain between the bottom and the top of the runner here so you can really see that sort of puzzle piece in there there's a little bit of a different design where mine has handles in it and the original has kind of a straight cut where all those cross pieces went through but all in all I'm really happy with it I hope my boys don't fight over who gets what I hope they can kind of come to an agreement and have sort of an heirloom for themselves let's see housekeeping stuff all of the usual links are gonna be down in the description you can go see the x-carve stuff you can go to my amazon store and see all the tools that I would have used in this the link to the easel file so you could cut one out yourself it might be worth looking at even if you don't have a neck scarf it could be worthwhile to go get an easel account and look at this project because you can get the design the shape the size of this whole thing from that because you know I didn't make plans I just drew it up in that program so I'm not gonna have plans available other than that unfortunately we don't actually have any snow around here right now so I can't take my kids out and get some fancy footage of them enjoying the sleds one of these days we'll do that but I guess for now I'm rambling I'm done hope you guys enjoyed it Merry Christmas we'll see you next time

Making A Sled For Christmas | Woodworking
Tagged on:                                                                                 

36 thoughts on “Making A Sled For Christmas | Woodworking

  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Hey, my dog’s name is Flint too!

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Ive subbed to your channel for sometime and been listening to the podcast. My question is what are the YouTube channel names of the other guys on the podcast? I would like to see the projects they discuss as well.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    This is not for Speed on snow

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Very nice project ! I liked your creative scarf joinery its not only functional it also. Adds character to the project its also a really. Cool family heirloom that doesn't take up a lot of space to store for the next kid to enjoy You could add a inlay on the deck. To spruce it up or personalize it as well my first. Thought is a family crest or name perhaps ? Just a idea or suggestion

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Very nice project ! I liked your creative scarf joinery its not only functional it also. Adds character to the project its also a really. Cool family heirloom that doesn't take up a lot of space to store for the next kid to enjoy You could add a inlay on the deck. To spruce it up or personalize it as well my first. Thought is a family crest or name perhaps ? Just a idea or suggestion

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    What kinda of sprayer is that?

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Very nicely done. Love making things for the family, especially ones that can be kept a lifetime and passed down.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Extra likes and views for the puppy!

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Beautiful job. It is something you can't buy in any walmart and built with quality!!!! 👍 it simply doesn't get better than this

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Now we only need to make snow

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Makes me wish we got snow where I lived so I could build one

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Awesome as always, Mark! Love your dog so much 😍

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    nice work on that sled, brings back some memories of my uncle giving us the cut off roof of an old ford cortina, there could of been 10 of us packed onto it and away we went, this was when you were allowed to have fun and not have to worry about offending someone. 🙂

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Think that machine is cheating, just me

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    think your cnc was trying to tell you things like this are meant to be made by hand

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Very nice! No snow here either – not that we get much in TN.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    I've still got my sled from my childhood. Its a hood off a 1972 Chevy Nova. Lol.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Well, it looks like you're going to have to go down south to play in the snow! LOL

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Amazing I love it . And to think your Dad never used a Xcarv lol. If you were to put a strip of metal down sled part it would go faster and maybe hold out to banging on hard surfaces .

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Nice one Mark, a nice way to make a family heirloom for your kids, just as your dad did for you.
    I think though it would be best to make some more, that way your kids will have one of their own and won't be fighting over it.
    Unfortunately where i live we don't get much snow, in fact we hardly get any so having a sled would be of no use to my family, but it's nice to see a real one getting made.
    Barry (ENG)

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Thats really a nice sled!! I don't have an X Carve but, your video has inspired me to try to make a sled for my Granddaughter. Merry Christmas to you and your family!!

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Would love to make this for my grandson.  I looked at the easel plans but they don't have any measurements or references so I could make a plan or pattern.  Could you share some measurements for those of us that don't use a CNC?

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Awesome build! You'll have top take it out!

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Very nice, I would like to make a scaled down version for decoration do you have this in DXF or SVG format?

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Only thing I didn’t like about this video is it didn’t last longer lolol this is cool! Your dog had me laughing 😂😂 keep the videos comin

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    This is a beautiful design. If you don't mind I'll try to replicate it. I don't have a cnc but I think I can just get pretty close with a jigsaw. Thanks for sharing!!! And excellent job on making this sled in oak!!!

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    That’s great that you were able to replicate something that your dad made for you that you enjoyed when you were young so your boys can have a similar experience. I really liked the story that went along with that. That turned out beautifully. Great work once again Mark.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Your dads is great but yours is better. I think the trouble and your fix, the rounded edges actually made the front of the sled look better. A truly nice way to honor your dad and give something of yourself to your boys.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    Love this project. I love that you have the sled from your childhood that your dad made. I love how you used newer technology to make it. Too bad there was no snow, but I’m sure you’ll post video on Instagram in the near future.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 8:39 pm
    Permalink

    So cool, Mark! I like how you were able to recreate that one from your dad. I’ve had the same problem with white oak splintering.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *