Popular depictions of the Roman world often
show us the picture during the late Republic or early Empire. But when did Roman domination
of the Mediterranean basin become all but inevitable? How was it that Rome eventually
grew to encompass the mighty Hellenistic kingdoms, and how did the legions come to establish
themselves as the dominant military system for almost a millennia – overshadowing Alexander
the Great’s phalanx? You will learn about that in our new series on the Macedonian Wars. LipSurf is a new, free browser extension that
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LipSurf has raving reviews in the Chrome webstore – an almost perfect 5-star rating. It only
takes 30 seconds to download and get started for free, so to do it via the link in the
description! The year is 231BC and the Mediterranean world
is a land of continuous warfare and political upheaval. Just ten years earlier, the burgeoning
power of the Roman Republic had defeated Carthage in the First Punic War, establishing naval
dominance at sea. In the east, the Hellenistic kingdoms – Macedon, Ptolemaic Egypt and the
Seleucid Empire – vie for dominance over their border territories. Sandwiched between these
greater polities are a number of smaller states, such as Pergamon and the nominally independent
Greek city-states. This is the world of the late 3rd century BC, but soon a series of
conflicts between two rising powers – Rome and Macedon – will change the fate of the
region forever. During this period, Illyria, which encompassed
modern Albania and Dalmatia, was regarded as a thoroughly barbarian region, only half
civilised by contact with its Hellenic neighbors. Though contact with the Greek world had led
to a degree of urbanisation in the south and along the coast, the region in a political
sense was still made up of many small tribal chieftains. The population of Illyria had
been regarded since their initial encounters as turbulent and warlike.
From time to time, one of the many Illyrian tribes would gain temporary hegemony over
most of the others, and in the 230s BC this was the Ardiaei. Ruled by their energetic
king, Agron, they had forged a union of not just their own Illyrian peoples, but also
prominent figures, such as Demetrius – the Greek lord of Pharos.
Coinciding with the rise of this new Illyrian power was the collapse of Epirus, whose once
formidable strength had waned and whose monarchy fell. Taking advantage of this weakness, the
Illyrians invaded, and eventually managed to seize Epirote territory far south of the
traditional border, climaxing with the seizure of Phoenice, the wealthiest city of the kingdom.
Despite these successes however, Agron perished soon after and was succeeded nominally by
his son. In reality, it was his wife Teuta who wielded true power, quickly being appointed
regent for her stepson. Her ascension did not stop Illyrian belligerence, and in her
reign piracy increasingly became a major problem in the Mediterranean. Seizures of more southerly
territories in Epirus had allowed the establishment of more staging points from which brigands
could sail. This had been occurring for a long time already, but the increasing scale
of the problem, the increasingly loud complaints of Roman merchants, and the economic impact
of piracy on the Republic prompted the Senate to act.
Uncharacteristically peacefully for the notoriously combative Romans, the initial senatorial reaction
in 230BC was not to send in the legions, but instead to send a diplomatic embassy of the
Coruncanius brothers to investigate the situation. In the typically harsh style of Roman diplomacy,
the Coruncanius brothers protested to Teuta about the increasing piracy and demanded that
it cease immediately. The demand was not negotiable and the Illyrians would have a chance to comply
peacefully – otherwise it would be war. Teuta refused this demand, either because
of her inability to control the actions of her decentralised tribal allies, or because
she simply did not wish to bend to Roman demands. Whatever the case, this did not please the
Romans, a situation made even worse by the murder of a Roman envoy, possibly by Teuta
herself in the midst of the anger of the meeting, or on the journey home by those very pirates
that the embassy had been dispatched to stop. While the death of the Roman envoy was the
immediate trigger for war, the expansion of the Ardiaei tribe’s power over the region
was a deeper geopolitical cause – Rome did not want any powerful rival in the Adriatic.
Late in the campaigning season of 229BC, a massive Roman force of 22,000 troops and 200
ships bore down on the Illyrians. Though details of the short campaign are lost, it is known
that the Roman expedition was a complete success from north to south. Teuta’s appointed governor
of the recently conquered island of Corcyra – Demetrius of Pharos – went over to the Roman
side almost immediately, while the queen regent’s forces were defeated in the field. By spring
of 228 Teuta had been forced into a peace treaty with the Romans, breaking her kingdom
into weaker segments and forbidding ventures of piracy into the southern Adriatic Sea.
The Romans withdrew their troops and left behind only their amicitia, or ‘friendship’
– a benign sounding term which would soon apparently become anything but that. In essence,
being a ‘friend’ of Rome included the de facto conditions of becoming an informal
client state. A primary beneficiary of the peace of 228
was the defector Demetrius of Pharos, who was granted a small independent principality
of his own, sandwiched between the remnant of the Ardiaean kingdom and the Greek cities.
Despite these gains under Roman auspices, it seems that the ambitious Demetrius was
not content to remain in his small kingdom, and shortly after the peace was finalised,
he married Triteuta – the Ardiaean king’s biological mother. By becoming the young boy’s
formal regent in this act, Demetrius of Pharos effectively recreated the powerful Illyrian
kingdom abolished by Rome in the First Illyrian War.
Even more boldly, he began to launch pillaging raids into the territory of Roman allied tribes.
It could be that Demetrius was ‘testing the water’ and, due to the lack of any Roman
response, he believed they either could not or did not wish to intervene. This was an
illusion, as the Romans were instead occupied by the Roman-Gallic War of 226-222BC, and
it would prove to be a fatal illusion for Demetrius.
Further trying his luck, Demetrius set out with 90 light galleys in the summer of 220BC
on a grand piracy expedition, ravaging cities around the Adriatic Sea in blatant violation
of the treaty eight years before. He had finally gone too far, and Rome decided that their
former ally Demetrius now posed the same threat to Roman interests that Teuta had, and moreover
wished to punish their friend for betraying them and not acting like a friend should.
The disproportionately massive Roman action which began in 219 was probably motivated
by the Republic’s desire to swiftly and decisively conclude the Illyrian situation
before a new war with Carthage began, as it seemed like it might. Demetrius’ strategy
was to hold the fortresses of Dimallum and Pharos itself, but the Romans took the former
in only seven days, while a rash sortie by Demetrius lost him Pharos. The man himself
evaded capture because he had placed a squadron of hidden galleys in a secret cove, fleeing
to them when the battle was lost. On these ships he fled to the south, abandoning his
family to Roman imprisonment and his men to death at Roman hands.
Not long after, Demetrius reached the Adriatic port town of Actium, where the fleet of a
great Hellenistic king – Philip V of Macedon – was anchored. When he arrived, the king
welcome Demetrius heartily and he quickly became a key advisor. Meanwhile, the Romans
withdrew all of their soldiers from the region, leaving no military presence. They once again
left only their friendship behind, but had demonstrated to the great Macedonian kingdom
to the south that they had the will to intervene in the east.
Before continuing, we need to reverse time for a moment and briefly examine the history
of Macedon after its would-be conqueror, Pyrrhus of Epirus, died in Argos. The victor in that
battle, Antigonus II Gonatas, was firmly in control of Macedon by 272, and had also established
hegemony over the Greek city-states. Having gained the loyalty of his turbulent homeland,
Antigonus II did his best to maintain it. He raised a great sacred mound to honour the
graves of the Argead house, reorganised the provincial system to increase its efficiency,
and was vigilant in keeping Macedonian coinage a high-quality currency.
Making good use of Macedon’s depleted resources and funds, Antigonus focused on access and
mobility, extensively utilising the Antigonid fleet and the great naval fortresses of Demetrias,
Chalcis and Corinth to ferry troops to strategic locations. An Athenian-led, Ptolemaic-supported
attempt at shaking off Macedonian domination failed in the Chremonidean War from 267 to
261. Though Antigonus managed to quell this revolt, crucial fortresses such as Acrocorinth
were lost during his reign, which finally ended in 239BC with his death. His successor
– Demetrius II – ruled for a relatively uneventful decade during which Macedon’s situation
weakened ever further, and he died in 229. The late king’s own son, Philip V, was only
a child at the time of his father’s death, and Macedon could not afford a child ruler
in such a perilous time. A regent was clearly required for the time being, and a distant
Antigonid relation was chosen for the task – Antigonus Doson. As one of the lesser known
but more highly competent Macedonian kings during the 3rd century BC, Antigonus Doson
began to raise the young Philip as his own son, and at the same time energetically set
to campaigning in order to beat back Macedon’s enemies.
He first marched north and expelled the Illyrians from the kingdom, and then struck south and
crushed the Aetolian League. After securing his borders, Antigonus proceeded to renounce
all Macedonian claims south of the Thermopylae pass, wisely hoping to consolidate and stabilise
the situation in Macedon itself. The response of the army was to demand that Antigonus accept
the title of king. While he did this, Philip V’s rights to the throne were not usurped
or taken away, and Antigonus swiftly appointed him the official heir.
After another series of victories, which included the first ever seizure of Sparta by a foreign
army, Antigonus III Doson perished in 221, leaving behind a resurgent, stable and increasingly
powerful Macedon to Philip V, who now ascended to the throne. Soon after taking the throne,
Philip V and the Macedonian hegemony were once again challenged by the Aetolian League
and its allies during the Social War of 220-217. The League believed Philip was too young to
be an effective ruler. It was during this war that Demetrius of Pharos arrived at the
royal court. Cataclysmic events in the west now began to
attract wider attention in the Mediterranean world. The Second Punic War had broken out
in 218, and the Carthaginian general Hannibal had successfully crossed the Alps to invade
Italy. There, he had already defeated one Roman field army at the Trebia River, and
in the June of 217, he crushed another at Lake Trasimene in Etruria [itroria]. Hearing
of these massive Roman defeats, Philip V now began to consider expansion in the west at
the expense of an apparently dying Roman Republic. This new direction was encouraged by Demetrius
of Pharos who, after being expelled from his Adriatic dominion by Rome, now argued that
Philip should end the Social War, gain control of the Illyrian coast and attack Italy himself.
Accepting the military status quo and ending the war in Greece at Naupactus, Philip then
drove the Illyrians from Macedon once again, and in the winter of 217 had a fleet of 100
light warships constructed. In the summer of 216 the king made his first attempt at
securing Illyria’s coastal region, but fled home upon hearing the news of an approaching
Roman fleet. The decisive Roman defeat at Cannae was another
crucial moment, as it prompted Philip to send envoys to Hannibal asking for a formal alliance
– he no doubt wanted to join the ‘winning’ side and make gains at Roman expense. The
story goes that the envoy – Xenophanes – was captured by a Roman praetor on his way to
speak with Hannibal, but managed to talk his way to freedom by stating that he was instead
there to make peace with Rome. However, the unfortunate Xenophanes was captured again
on his way back to Macedon with the formal treaty with Hannibal in his possession. It
was in this manner that the Romans learned of the new threat that faced them.
Following the conclusion of the Punic-Macedonian treaty, Philip aggressed further with new
attacks against coastal Illyria, attacking Corcyra in 215. This intensified in 214 when
a major offensive began – Philip’s land army marched north into Illyria through Epirus,
while 120 Macedonian galleys sailed up the Straits of Otranto. In this campaign Philip
swiftly seized Oricum and besieged Apollonia, who called to Rome for help.
With a strengthened Adriatic fleet, the Roman commander Laevinus now crossed the sea with
55 heavy Roman warships, lifted the siege of Apollonia and drove the Macedonians away
from Oricum – two crucial ports which could have been used as a staging point for an attack
on Italy. After these victories, Laevinus wintered his fleet in Oricum, while Philip
burned his ships and retreated overland to Macedon.
Having been blocked at sea, the Macedonian king attacked instead over the Pindus mountains,
making significant gains in 213 and 212. The inland Dassaretis, Parthini and Atintani tribal
settlements fell to him, without a significant Roman response. The Republic did not have
the land troops to spare for a side-venture into the eastern Adriatic, as they were still
fighting against Hannibal. This situation changed during the later part of 212 when
Philip was once again able to reach the Adriatic. Having battered his way over land to the coast,
he managed to seize the coastal fortress of Lissus, another possible staging point. It
became clear to the Romans that this eastern threat could no longer be ignored.
Neutralising Philip at this point was beyond Roman military power alone due to the Carthaginian
War, so the Senate began to use diplomacy as a weapon, and started enticing other Greek
states to do the neutralising for them. A treaty was made between the traditionally
anti-Macedon Aetolian League and Rome, the former being convinced of the alliance because
of Roman victories in the Punic War during the summer of 211 at Capua and Tarentum. Terms
were generous for the Aetolians – they would get any captured town or city, but the booty
would go to the Romans unless the town was jointly taken. Another term allowed for the
inclusion of other Aetolian allies, such as Sparta, Elis, Messenia, the Illyrians, and
even Pergamum. The war itself was a disruptive, indecisive
slogging match, with the Romans taking several important centres such as Anticyra, but Philip
V making gains against the rest of the coalition. Attempts at peace talks by non-combatant states
failed in 207 due to Rome’s deliberate derailing actions, but during 206 and 205 they were
gradually forced into peace. Though the final treaty ending the war at Phoenice concluded
hostilities for now, it was clear that Rome’s desire to punish Philip for his attempt at
kicking them while they were down was not yet sated. One thing was certain, however:
Rome was ever so slowly winning the Second Punic War and would soon be able to harness
all of its might against Macedon. New videos in our series on the Macedonian
Wars are on the way, so make sure you are subscribed to our channel and pressed the
bell button. We would like to express our gratitude to our Patreon supporters and channel
members, who make the creation of our videos possible. Now, you can also support us by
buying our merchandise via the link the description. This is the Kings and Generals channel, and
we will catch you on the next one.

Macedonian Wars: First Roman Intervention in the Hellenic Affairs
Tagged on:                                                                                                                                                         

100 thoughts on “Macedonian Wars: First Roman Intervention in the Hellenic Affairs

  • September 25, 2019 at 11:02 pm
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    The best way to join the Roman Legion http://bit.ly/2kRVWX8 or the Macedonian Phalanx http://bit.ly/2la3ODp unless you have a time machine, of course. Lipsurf is a creation of one of our oldest patrons, so give it some love 🙂

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 10:41 am
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    I like how the map is colored in the style of Imperetor Rome

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 10:50 am
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    Stop! You have violated the law! Pay your fine or your stolen goods will be forfeit.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 10:59 am
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    you avoided pronouncing his son's name 3:49

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 11:03 am
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    👍

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 11:04 am
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    The roof tile over Pyrrhus' death animation was a nice touch.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 11:18 am
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    What is up with Greeks and killing envoys?

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 11:18 am
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    What is up with Greeks and killing envoys?

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 11:30 am
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    Thanks for recommending me Lipsurf. I have to admit it was tough but I was determined to watch all of your videos, considering that I have no arms.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 11:33 am
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    Reaserch mudflood this is all silly.Roman and greek civ are fake!

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 11:42 am
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    The fact that you used a stone and not a roof tile to show Pyrrhus dying greatly upsets me.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 11:58 am
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    i wonder if i'll unsubscribe watching the intro with that browser

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 12:11 pm
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    Macedon: How can you pierce our majestic phalanx?
    Rome: yes, disciplinomacy

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 12:25 pm
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    Beautiful video, I hope you cover the Ottoman siege of Cyprus 1570 1573

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 12:30 pm
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    Fake history lol

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 12:31 pm
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    More top down battles plz

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 12:32 pm
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    I'm impressed, often you think at punic wars as romans vs carthaginians but it's overlooked a lot how many enemies at the same time the romans were fighting, over the carthaginians and their mercenaries coming from all the mediterrain there are macedonians, gallics, illyrians and iberians .

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 12:55 pm
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    Good series

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 1:09 pm
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    ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝ STRONGGGG 💪

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 1:26 pm
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    I didn't know much about the Macedonian wars and what was happening in the Adriatic while Rome fighted with Hannibal. Very interesting, I'm definitely looking forward to more videos!

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 1:41 pm
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    ILLYRIA😍🤤 Agron and Teuta 💪🇦🇱 ,thx Kings and Generals i love your videos too much your the best 👏👏👏

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 1:44 pm
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    There is one question I always had about the ancient army of Macedon: did they have any infantry unit dedicated for fighting with swords, not spears? Or their infantry as mostly spearmen and pikemen? I ask this because in the I have seen such units especially in the Total War game and Mods you use for recreating the battle scenes, and I knew that they relied on spears, the sword being just a backup option

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 1:51 pm
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    Actually this is one of generally known History's gap: how Rome came to conquer Greece. So, another K&G series to watch closely.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 1:52 pm
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    So this is around 40 yrs after the death of Alexander the Great?

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 1:52 pm
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    Illiria=🇦🇱
    Greece=🇬🇷
    Roman empire= 🇮🇹
    UNA FACCIA UNA RAZZA MAMMA MIA🤣

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 1:58 pm
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    Me, playing "A Legionary´s Life" for 14 hours straight, seeing this video in my feed

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 2:09 pm
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    If only the Greeks had seen how badly they get their asses kicked after the death of Alexander

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 2:14 pm
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    2 fronts tackled at the same time

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 2:37 pm
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    It is Cynos Cephalae. it is two words..as we say, New York for example and not NewYork
    ΚΥΝΟΣ ΚΕΦΑΛΑΙ

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 2:42 pm
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    AGRON🇦🇱 DEMETRIUS OF PHAROS🇦🇱 TEUTA🇦🇱 PYRRHUS🇦🇱

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    1:42 “Grek” city states. Guess that second e didn’t fit on the screen

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 2:59 pm
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    It was a sad day in History, When Rome finally fell. The American Empire is crumbling from within. The Left will never be Right.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 2:59 pm
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    I'm thinking we need a video on Antigonas the Third.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 3:20 pm
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    You should do a series of Alexander's conquest of Persia.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 3:34 pm
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    Ha! My small village Antikyra is mentioned in the video

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 3:42 pm
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    You should a video on the Roman conquer of Dacia, very interesting how our language has such heavy Latin roots surrounded by Slavic countries 🙂

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 3:43 pm
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    Okay that extension is cool but I wouldn't trust some random company with recordings of my voice

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 3:45 pm
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    is that ck2 music I hear at the beginning of the video?

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 3:49 pm
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    I love you guys channel! Keep it up!

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 3:57 pm
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    Holy shit, I'm just not getting used to the quality of these videos! Awesome stuff guys!

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 4:06 pm
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    America may give you freedom but Rome gives friendship oh yeah baby

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 4:10 pm
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    i apologize for my cynism regarding real humans but all this actions resemble a boring computer game and after the 124th war it seems far more exciting to settle conflicts peacefully

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 4:12 pm
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    Great video as always! Can't wait for the rest of this series!

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 4:21 pm
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    Punic wars should be your next historical series

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 4:21 pm
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    Did Sparta recover from the first ever occupation by the Macedons ?

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 4:29 pm
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    Hannibal was black as night

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 4:43 pm
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    Never clicked on a video so quickly!

    Thank you 😃

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 4:55 pm
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    13:55 “ Kings and Generals”pronounced the name of the greatest military commander in history 😍😍

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 4:56 pm
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    Now i wanna start playing Civ again…

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 5:02 pm
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    It is Macedonia

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 5:02 pm
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    It is not Hellenic

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    15:30
    "Stop! You've violated the law"

    TES IV – Oblivion reference or just coincidence? The guards say it all the time

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 5:56 pm
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    great vids for while eating. Keep it up, m8. We still´ve to watch that phallanx getting mauled at a strange terrain

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 6:31 pm
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    Ok, first error straight in my face. The Cantabrians are in Catalonia not in Cantabria!

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 7:24 pm
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    Name of the first song: The Byzantine Empire (Crusader Kings 2 Soundtrack)

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 7:52 pm
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    So, after all these years now, I realised why the Albanians and the Serbs hate each other . The Illyrians were the enemies of Rome, Serbia the heir to the Byzantine empire's thrown is the natural enemy of Albania . Even more so, because Albanians are the loyal subjects

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 8:07 pm
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    Fantastic video guys, I have been wondering for years about this conflict, and these series shed a ton of light on it!

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 8:24 pm
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    Rome: please stop the piracy, you are hurting our republic. If you stop now all is good but if you don’t you are forcing us into war.

    Illyria: How dare you tell us to stop pirating you’re goods!

    Rome: Shame.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 8:29 pm
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    Illyrians: Do what you want `cause the pirates is free! You are a PIRATE!
    Romans: [angry garum noises]

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 8:37 pm
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    Kings and generals, are you going to cover “Nader Shah”, as you mentioned in one of your videos, I thought you were going to cover him in spring of 2019. Thanks

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 9:28 pm
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    Rome had some treacherous neighbours. Elephants from the south, coming in from the north. Bad Greeks betraying good Greeks in the east. Gauls and Celtish Druids doing who know what, who knows where. Visigoths and Ostrogoths being gothic in the dark forests of Germania. Chaldeans and Armenians poisoning everyone, all the time, in Syria. Judeans and Egyptians committing every kind of atrocity against man and the gods.
    The work of an honest Roman legionnaire, and his dutiful senators, was endless.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 10:24 pm
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    Lmao the one time the Romans try peaceful diplomacy with a hostile state, the envoys get murdered.

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 11:00 pm
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    wait..were the italian colonies not Hellenistic? Like ik they were "greek" but. I mean linguistically and.. Ethnic-ly?😂

    Reply
  • September 27, 2019 at 11:05 pm
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    IMJIN WAR, KOREA VS JAPAN PLEASE

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 12:18 am
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    Always fun watching these top quality productions. Thank you King And Generals.

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 12:30 am
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    Make a video of the today's problem with Greek and fyroms claims.. About real Macedonian historical information

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 12:44 am
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    instead of wasting time negotiating with Hannibal, Philip v should have outright attacked Italy. With a chunk of Southern Italy in his possession and Rome facing two fronts , Hannibal would have come to the bargaining table anyway,

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 1:06 am
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    Rome: slowly winning the second Punic War
    Phillip: mistakes were made

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 1:44 am
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    This is the exact video that answered the question that kept looming in my mind: How did Roman manage to infiltrate and finally subjugated the Hellenic World.

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 2:15 am
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    Ohh the invasion in Macedonia is invasion in the Hellenic territory…But I though that Macedonia was something else…ohh finally it was nothing else but Greek.. From now on I will keep that mind. Thanks

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 2:23 am
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    You should make an extra video each week. Its what gets mw through the week.

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 2:38 am
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    The Macedonians always failed because, Alexander's genius was degraded by a line of men facing one direction only…

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 5:07 am
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    When would you like to do the imjim war

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 5:13 am
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    This series is perfect!

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 6:36 am
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    King ang Generals friends , Video on "Almanzor" Warrior Muslim of Al-Andalus y the Siege of Barcelona 985 DC , please

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 6:37 am
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    Pretty silly for the Romans not to leave a small garrison behind and recruit local auxiliary instead of relying on "friendship" lol. I thought the Romans were more sophisticated but apparently lots of flaws in their organization.

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 7:43 am
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    dat pretty retarded on that messager to run straight toward roman land to give message

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  • September 28, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    i like to attack rome everyday when i am playing total war 2

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  • September 28, 2019 at 9:09 am
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    Cynoscephelae!!! S2

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  • September 28, 2019 at 9:15 am
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    The History Channel: exists
    Kings and Generals: I'm about to end this mans entire career.

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  • September 28, 2019 at 10:25 am
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    Brilliant video as always 😁 If you can cover the struggles of the Scottish fight against the English 💪💪

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  • September 28, 2019 at 11:38 am
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    Liked the Lipsurf ad, much bettter than crap mobile games!

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 11:47 am
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    Korea vs Japan, IMJIN WAR or SCOTLAND VS ENGLAND ( Rough Wooing War)

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  • September 28, 2019 at 11:59 am
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    "She refused Roman conditions and probably killed the onvoys."
    Great mistake

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  • September 28, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    Enjoy your referral bonus, breh breh

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  • September 28, 2019 at 4:42 pm
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    Great job! Loves these discussions of lesser known wars. So much of the larger history of the world is built on these side notes and detours not discussed. Usually we go from the Punic Wars to the Gallic Campaigns to the Civil War. Thank you.

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  • September 28, 2019 at 6:35 pm
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    An Illyrian queen conquers and unites the tribes, allowing them to continue in their old ways, including piracy.

    The Illyrian queen murders the Roman who was impertinent to her, saying THIS IS ILLYRIA!

    A Greek traitor sells out to the Romans and then hopes to be 1/10 of what Teuta ever was. Just like that politician in the movie 300, who secretly worked for the Persians.

    Teuta commits suicide, as she cannot leave as basically a Roman slave.

    These wars just show how superior the barbarian Illyrians were to the Greeks. Teuta was an open foe to the Romans and died a proud and free woman. Demetrius acted like an ally and died a worm.

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  • September 28, 2019 at 7:29 pm
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    Form pikes macedonian

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  • September 28, 2019 at 9:01 pm
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    For anyone interested there’s a good historical fiction book set during the Roman-Macedonia conflict, called Clash of Empires by Ben Kane. I liked it because it showed both sides of the war.

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  • September 28, 2019 at 9:25 pm
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    Can you do a video about phillips II of macedon and how he rose to power

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  • September 28, 2019 at 9:42 pm
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    Everytime I watch your videos I end up booting up total war games

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  • September 28, 2019 at 10:07 pm
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    I lost count of how many times my island changed hands in this video.

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  • September 28, 2019 at 10:14 pm
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    I dislike one thing about this video. We hear all these names about macedonian leaders, illyrian leaders, etc. But the romans are just… the romans. Who is running the show at this time? Ok probably the senate, but what about their generals on the field? And the same could be said about the Aetolian League but let's say this is not so necessary, they are not one of the two main antagonists.

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  • September 28, 2019 at 10:17 pm
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    I loved the Roman soldiers speech bubble at 15:32 "stop! you've violated the law" A little Easter egg of the Elder scrolls IV Oblivion right there was it? haha

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  • September 28, 2019 at 10:52 pm
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    Love these videos.

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  • September 28, 2019 at 11:55 pm
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    Love the new maps

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  • September 29, 2019 at 5:48 am
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    Could you stop the pop-up sounds please!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 7:09 am
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    There's a little link missing, Dmitry prior to the naval battle gave Romans Teuta's strategy in compensation for the throne and the friendly treaty, hopefully not on purpose.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 7:11 am
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    🔥🔥 Rock !

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  • September 29, 2019 at 7:29 am
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    Iliria is still half civilized.

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