People in developed
countries often take it for granted that they can eat
whatever delicacy they want from anywhere in the world. But there are some who fear
that this globalization of food is putting all of us at
risk, and they are now going back to living off the land. Here’s correspondent
JJ Kelley in Hawaii. [music playing] KIMI WERNER (VOICEOVER):
When I go spear phishing, I become an actual
part of the ocean. I become a part of
my roots, of Hawaii. I become a hunter. And more than anything, if
the boats were to stop coming, I know how to survive. JJ KELLEY: Hawaii is one of the
most remote places on Earth. To get here, it was two
flights, 12 hours total. But it feels like
you’re out there. Like coastal populations
around the world– NEIL CAVUTO: All right. You talk about Irma, you
talk about Puerto Rico– JJ KELLEY: –Hawaiians
face threats unique to their geography. And when disaster strikes, they
get pushed to the brink fast. Here, some 90% of the food
that’s consumed is imported. That means that Hawaii has
about a 10-day supply of food. That didn’t always
used to be the case. Up until the islands
were largely carved up by US-backed pineapple
and sugar plantations in the early 20th century,
Hawaiians fed themselves. Now, a growing number
of their descendants are working to do so again. So it’s 6:00 AM right now. We’re gonna go get a meal. We’re not going to
the grocery store. We’re going to the ocean. JJ KELLEY (VOICEOVER):
This is Makua Beach, on the island of Oahu. I’m going diving on
this overcast day with Hawaiian native Kimi Werner. JJ KELLEY: It fits. Oh, good.
This is– – Weights.
– –your weight belt. All right. If you need more,
we can give you more. JJ KELLEY: Kimmie is a champion
spear fisher and freediver, but she’s not here for sport. Our goal today is
to get dinner to eat. How do you teach yourself
how to do something like that? KIMI WERNER: Well, I mean,
I learned from my dad. He was a freediver
and spear fisherman, and he just used this to
put food on the table. That is what gave me my ability,
I think, to relax in the water. JJ KELLEY (VOICEOVER):
Kimi’s weapon of choice is a trigger-fired spear gun. This is for you. All right. Little one for me. JJ KELLEY (VOICEOVER): She says
mine is for emergency use only. Just in case a really big,
aggressive fish, like a shark comes in, you just
have something to put in between you and it. This is reassuring. All right.
I’m in good hands. KIMI WERNER: [laughs] Yes. Should we do this? KIMI WERNER: I think so. Let’s do this. We kick out to the site of a
sunken ship called the Mahi. There, Kimi takes a
deep breath of air and disappears down
into the abyss. She just drops, drops,
drops, and I can’t even– can’t even see her anymore. Like, she’s 90 feet
underwater with no scuba, laying on the
ground and waiting. KIMI WERNER (VOICEOVER):
When I go spear phishing, I become a predator. I become a lioness looking for
food in my natural environment. JJ KELLEY: Look at her fish. Well done.
– Oh, thanks. High five.
That’s a– – Thank you.
– –beautiful fish. It is. JJ KELLEY (VOICEOVER):
Kimi’s caught a pualu, a breed of
surgeon fish Hawaiians have been dining
on for centuries. Obviously, you know,
this isn’t easy work. No. Like, diving to 100 feet
to get a fish like this? There’s obviously
easier ways to get food. KIMI WERNER
(VOICEOVER): But when you put that work in
yourself, it makes you appreciate it that much more. I know that I’m
sourcing it responsibly, and it’s evidence that I
can take care of myself. JJ KELLEY: In a place so removed
from the rest of the world, knowing how to catch a fish
is a handy skill to have. Yet, we didn’t see many
other people out fishing. And that has Kimi worried. KIMI WERNER: If anything were
to ever happen where the boats were to stop coming, then
people wouldn’t know how to survive because we
aren’t designed right now to take care of ourselves. That didn’t always used
to be the case here, though. No. JJ KELLEY: Up until
the mid-1800s, Hawaiians had a system of
divvying up land into mountain to shore slices. What you harvested depended
on what part of the slice lived on. And it was called ahupua’a. And the way it worked is that
if people from the mountains needed some fish, they would
come down and they would trade, whether it’s fruits
or vegetable or taro, and people were able to
take care of themselves in this system that
was 100% sustainable. JJ KELLEY: In the era of
Blue Apron and Amazon Go, many would consider
such a system primitive. Not Kimi. KIMI WERNER
(VOICEOVER): If you were to look at any other
species of animal– –it’s like the first thing
on their list when they’re born. They’re going to be taught how
to get water, how to get food. KIMI WERNER
(VOICEOVER): And I just don’t get how having
that knowledge and having those skills
makes us primitive– –and not having any of
them makes us civilized. JJ KELLEY: She has a
point, especially when civilization is so fragile. This is the port of Honolulu. We’re on an island right now. I live on an island– Manhattan. I remember when
Hurricane Sandy hit, and my wife and I lost
power, we lost heat, we didn’t know where we
were gonna get our food, and it was scary. And that’s on an island
with bridges and tunnels. Here, this is the
bridge and tunnel. This is the connection
to the outside world, where their food comes in. And if something goes wrong, the
stakes are just a lot higher. When we come back, for plenty
of Hawaiians, self-sufficiency isn’t a fringe fad– There’s a pig right there. JJ KELLEY: –it’s a dangerous,
heart-pumping reality. [bow shoots] [music playing] JJ KELLEY (VOICEOVER):
I’m JJ Kelley in Hawaii, a place so reliant on
imported groceries, it’s estimated the islands have
only a 10-day supply of food. For some locals, the
solution is self-reliance. And I’m here to meet a few
of those on the front lines, like bow hunter Justin Lee. Do you remember a moment in
your life where you decided, this is how you want
to find your food? JUSTIN LEE (VOICEOVER): My
dad passed it down onto me, and you know, he was my hero. Being the man that brought home
dinner via hunting or gathering was the kind of man
that I wanted to be. So what are we
hunting for today? We’re gonna be
hunting for wild boar. We got some wild goats and
some wild sheep out here. JJ KELLEY: None of these
species are native to Hawaii. They were introduced to
the islands by the West. But with no natural predators
to keep their populations in check, their numbers ballooned. Today, feral herds
threaten Hawaii’s delicate ecosystem,
overgrazing and trampling endangered species. They’re a problem. They are. JJ KELLEY: Especially the pigs. JUSTIN LEE: They
root up everything, and they destroy the land. They’re nature’s
bulldozer, basically. JJ KELLEY: They’re
so destructive, the Hawaiian government
encourages their eradication, which is why Justin and I
are out here this morning. Is there any limit on the
amount that you can shoot? JUSTIN LEE: If you’re
hunting on public land, you’re allowed two pigs a day. A day. Yeah, so there’s plenty
of food out here. You could feed your
village, for sure. There’s a pig right there. Pig? JUSTIN LEE: Yeah. Wow, you got a good eye. Well go this, this way, and
then we’ll come up on him. JJ KELLEY (VOICEOVER): As if we
needed more proof of Hawaii’s ample protein supply,
a flock of feral sheep appears on the horizon. You see ’em? Yeah. JJ KELLEY (VOICEOVER): Briefly. Oh, no. There they go. They’re gone. Yeah, they’re gone. They know we’re here. Let’s try and
focus on this boar. OK. JUSTIN LEE: Those are pigs. JJ KELLEY (VOICEOVER):
Startled boars will charge their aggressors and
slice them with tusks as sharp as razor blades. It’s a dangerous game,
but a well-placed shot could potentially feed a family
of four for nearly a week. [boar squeals] Wow. Got him. JJ KELLEY: Wow. Yeah, this is a good
eating boar right here. JJ KELLEY: So how
much does he weigh? This guy’s probably 80 pounds. He’s not that big. But the younger,
the better they are. JJ KELLEY: Bubbles emerge
from the wound, a sign that the arrow hit the lung. That means that it
was a quick kill. So what do you do first? JUSTIN LEE: You have to pay
our respect to this boar. You know, we’re not
just killing for fun. For us to survive,
something has to die. Thank you very much. JJ KELLEY (VOICEOVER):
Since he’ll be carrying the meat out with him,
Justin’s selective about what he harvests. We’re gonna take off his front
shoulder, his hindquarters, and then his back strap. That’s the tenderloin. Can you hold this up like this? Yeah. And this is meat that’ll
feed your family. It’ll feed my family
a few times, yeah. My neighbor’s family, as well. You know, it’s a community vibe. JJ KELLEY: It might
be surprising to think that self-sufficiency would
foster a sense of community. Yet Kimi says that’s exactly how
strong, resilient systems are born. KIMI WERNER (VOICEOVER):
Sometimes I’d have a fish that was so
big, I’d have to share it. The beautiful surprise
that came from that is that, then, a week later, I’d
have avocados at my doorstep. You know, I’d have fruit
from people with trees, eggs from their chickens. JJ KELLEY: Kimi calls it
her own modern day ahupua’a. But in a state that lies 2000
miles away from the mainland, it’s also common sense. And this push, for
self-sufficiency, is gaining ground. The Hawaiian
government has launched plans to double the amount
of food grown on the island by 2020. Can I join the party? KIMI WERNER: I suppose. JJ KELLEY (VOICEOVER):
If tonight’s potluck is any indication, that
goal is within reach. Oh, my god.
This is so good. KIMI WERNER: Well, I know why. JJ KELLEY: What’s
on the table here? Well, starting here, we
have the pualu that we shot. JJ KELLEY: I recognize him. KIMI WERNER: And he’s stuffed
with local citrus and fruit. We have our wild pig that one of
my hunter friends dropped off. It’s just a feast
that comes together. MAN: It looks amazing. And it strikes me,
you’re one person going out and doing this. But it creates a community. MAN: All right. Thank you, everybody,
for being here. JJ KELLEY: And it
changes a culture. If doomsday happens, you’re
gonna have the upper hand. KIMI WERNER: Right. JJ KELLEY: These folks know
that strength and independence aren’t a reward for
fighting against nature, but for learning to roll with
whatever it throws your way. KIMI WERNER: Man likes
to try to conquer nature. But we don’t get to dictate. Sometimes nature’s like, uh-uh. Not today. And so when you live in
this type of lifestyle, and you’re actually living
off of the land and the ocean, you are living by
what nature gives you. Connecting over conquering. MAN: Absolutely.

Living Off the Land in Hawaii | Explorer

100 thoughts on “Living Off the Land in Hawaii | Explorer

  • February 13, 2019 at 6:28 pm
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    Some Hawaiian citizens believe the extra work involved in "living off the land" makes one appreciate food more. What are your thoughts on this type of consumption?

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  • July 9, 2019 at 2:38 am
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    How does a human have that kind of lung capacity? Energy to go down, energy to lie in wait, and energy ro resurface WITH additional weight.

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  • July 9, 2019 at 2:38 am
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    How does a human have that kind of lung capacity? Energy to go down, energy to lie in wait, and energy ro resurface WITH additional weight.

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  • July 9, 2019 at 2:47 am
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    Great aspect in the world today especially with a lot of GMO products on the shelves.

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  • July 9, 2019 at 8:37 pm
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    I'm a bit confused as to why this is marketed as native Hawaiians are the only people who hunt, fish, and grow their own food. I commend these people for doing this, but the presentation seems a bit off. People from every culture partake in these practices. Even in the midst western urban sprawl.

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  • July 10, 2019 at 6:39 pm
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    Ya and you're gonna become a meal for a shark!

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  • July 11, 2019 at 12:04 pm
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    2 models that everyone should follow, nothing wrong with trying to live off the land to feed yourself and Family, Governments are always happy to feed you what makes you sick and their pockets full, plus I like that they grow and hunt just what they need, a lot of us over buy (Costco) and food can spoil…

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  • July 13, 2019 at 12:38 am
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    she probably give good head

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  • July 13, 2019 at 11:56 am
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    Hawaiian people:
    Badjao 🇵🇭: hold my 🐟

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  • July 13, 2019 at 10:40 pm
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    Kimmy you are food.. you are delicious… Wow

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  • July 14, 2019 at 10:41 am
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    such a beautiful life

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  • July 14, 2019 at 7:34 pm
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    too bad im allergic to fish

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  • July 14, 2019 at 8:39 pm
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    90 ft free dive? I was lucky to get 20 ft Sister you have some lungs.

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  • July 15, 2019 at 8:58 pm
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    The bores are hard to find here on Oahu

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  • July 16, 2019 at 1:23 am
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    The most beautiful thing about this documentary was the breathtaking Kimi

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  • July 16, 2019 at 11:12 am
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    Ummm………. boats won’t stop delivering to a US state no matter where it is 😂😂 It’s a cool hobby but it’s not for reasons stated

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  • July 17, 2019 at 2:37 am
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    The sea huntress and the bow hunter and they gatherers in between should begin Ahu Pua’a” again in today’s time Mahalo Nui Loa and Aloha

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  • July 18, 2019 at 6:05 am
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    I think the lesson she teaches us is excellent . We have to make our life style eco friendly so that the balance with nature should be maintain .

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  • July 19, 2019 at 12:16 pm
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    What a courageous woman. Great documentary

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  • July 19, 2019 at 8:17 pm
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    Hopefully no shark at all

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  • July 19, 2019 at 10:22 pm
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    I wanna know how long she can hold her breath

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  • July 19, 2019 at 10:37 pm
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    Looks out of this world 👋👋

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  • July 20, 2019 at 2:40 pm
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    At the same time let's go back to living without medicine and let nature thin the herd with an average life span of 40-50yrs old….when your reproductive years have past, it's time to exit the stage…. Ya, I didn't think so either. Enjoy the ease of processed foods people… our ancestors are jealous.

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  • July 20, 2019 at 9:05 pm
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    I remember her from Bon Appétit video with Brad.

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  • July 21, 2019 at 6:47 pm
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    I picked up hunting to avoid GMOs and other chemicals used by mass produced food

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  • July 21, 2019 at 6:48 pm
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    I picked up hunting to avoid GMOs and other chemicals used by mass produced farmers

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  • July 22, 2019 at 8:19 pm
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    This guy is a tool

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  • July 23, 2019 at 7:26 pm
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    Amazing video!! Love the Hawaiian culture that went into this video!

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  • July 24, 2019 at 1:12 am
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    Nice in theory, but if every person in Hawaii tried to live off the land, the ocean would be devoid of fish in a month and the ecosystem would be destroyed. They import food for a reason. The land cannot support the population.

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  • July 24, 2019 at 1:51 am
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    Wow Kim's vibe is peaceful knowing it's just you and the almighty, out in the deep blue sea.

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  • July 24, 2019 at 2:32 am
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    Ludem fish😆

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  • July 24, 2019 at 5:11 am
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    Lucky to find a wife like that…

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  • July 25, 2019 at 1:25 am
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    I see some Hate comments on this vid & I laugh because us Hawaiian’s actually Polynesians in general can survive of the land & water period. JAHLOHA to all my Brownies. Poly Pride All Day Every Day🤙🏾🤙🏾

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:31 am
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    If we did this more we wouldnt have so much pollution nor have the need for money…well for the most part. Maybe we should bring back the barter system

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  • July 25, 2019 at 4:47 am
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    Shes awsome!

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  • July 25, 2019 at 9:29 pm
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    People who live by nature are more peaceful

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  • July 26, 2019 at 1:43 am
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    Would love to live there and learn the life style

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  • July 26, 2019 at 11:46 am
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    “For us to survive, something has to die”. This is why i dont get people who get mad at people who kill animals for people to eat. Its just like a predator hunting for a prey. I do go against killings animals that we dont need to kill. But people have to accept that we are predators and we cant change that. We just have to kill some animals to live

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  • July 27, 2019 at 11:55 pm
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    Dass how its done Hawaiian style

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  • July 28, 2019 at 12:50 am
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    Aloha spirit indeed.
    Would of loved this if it was about the people, the Hawaii pot luck, the aloha spirit.

    Individuals living a idealistic lifestyle. This is OK when it’s just a few going along as Tarzan and Jane.

    However there are 1.1million people living here on Oahu.
    Let’s be realistic National Geographic if as you suggests that the boats stop running, and the planes don’t land and we are on the brink of doomsday’s and the only way for us to survive is to have primitive hunting & gathering skills that a seven year old kid can learn in a day is a laughable concept to say the least.
    For example as you say on the 11th day our food is gone.
    Then my friend you will see a real community first panic, there will be tens of Thousand of people armed with fins and spears in the ocean.
    And unless you guys scared away all the fish, oh my gosh there were hardly any fish where she was anyway and so little.

    And please bows & arrows are you for real this is Hawai’i of the USA there are hunters here with guns those pigs and sheep will be gone quick.

    The time has come upon us all to put the pagan tribal rituals of all our past cultures where they belong.
    Which is in the past.
    Let’s us not forget that King Kamahamaha and his court like all kings got the best fish.

    It’s not about connecting with nature or conquering people no way.
    It’s a realistic approach and a complete understanding that there are a lot of us here and we all need to eat everyday

    Aloha.
    I expected more from you National Geographic.

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  • July 28, 2019 at 1:08 am
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    Oh and by the way, that piece of land where you killed the pig. Well that’s a beautiful place to grow fruit trees. But no trees why not?
    The Hawaii government? Why say that? would you say the New York government or the Kentucky Government?

    J.J. Jelly you need to research before you just show up and blab blab blab.
    How you get that job anyway?

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  • July 28, 2019 at 7:50 pm
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    You don't have to kill to survive!

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  • July 28, 2019 at 11:07 pm
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    She's immune to cigatera

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  • July 29, 2019 at 6:10 am
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    @JAKE JOHNSON your sped

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  • July 29, 2019 at 3:55 pm
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    holy smoke , i cant even dive more than 10 feet.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 7:56 am
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    this woman is a very skillful hunter… love to watch… great spearfishing.. credits to Natgeo and all in this video… keep it up

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:09 pm
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    Wow real talk🙌🙌🙌🙌

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  • July 30, 2019 at 3:15 pm
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    It is a very pity that people continue to destroy nature and National Geographic helps, very very sad 😞😞😞👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇

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  • July 30, 2019 at 5:12 pm
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    fvck the people who disliked that video

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  • July 30, 2019 at 7:49 pm
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    I moved a month ago to the Big Island of Hawaii. Learning this way of life, helping support one another, and coexisting with nature and the land has been the biggest eye opening experience for me. I plan to keep learning the ways of the Hawaiin culture, and living the rest of my life in such a way. Awesome insight video to the survival of the Hawaiin Islands Natgeo

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  • July 30, 2019 at 11:53 pm
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    I’m thinking of moving there this are the kind of life I was born with but grew up in the busy city life

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  • July 31, 2019 at 9:48 am
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    Love when Justin says it'll feed his neighbor's family too, "It's a community thing"…. That's awesome!!

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  • August 1, 2019 at 12:49 pm
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    She so right, Thumbs up to her

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  • August 2, 2019 at 12:56 am
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    This is such a beautiful and peaceful way to live life. Humans are going to bulldoze everything and will panic when it’s too late we are going to need the environment to survive. So be good to it and it will be good to you.

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  • August 2, 2019 at 3:11 am
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    Great time capsule and reminders for all generations. Thanks guys great story

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  • August 2, 2019 at 4:41 am
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    From North Carolina 🇱🇷✌️..This is interesting. No burger hut or Mc dam Donald's. It does help ppl the be someways selp sufficient. My mom & I garden & buy local seafood. When possible I fish.

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  • August 2, 2019 at 5:08 am
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    She’s still using civilization though. She buys toilet paper, has a fridge with food in it, and uses a vehicle with fuel to get around, etc. It’s not completely“living off the land”. She is a bad a$$ though.

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  • August 2, 2019 at 6:06 am
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    In the picture of Kim’s dad at 2:48 it looks like there’s a face in the rock

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  • August 2, 2019 at 6:39 am
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    I want a Kimi! 🥰 Wondering though, do you ever test your fish for radiation? Like from Fukashima?

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  • August 2, 2019 at 9:13 am
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    Going to Foodland is easier

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  • August 2, 2019 at 2:37 pm
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    Da könnte die OMV auch noch bohren 😕! Wirtschaft vor Umwelt à la Sebastian Kurz & Trump 😕 😕 😕 😕 😕!

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  • August 2, 2019 at 6:48 pm
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    Living off the land after you purchase the vehicle, spear gun, wet suit, etc. etc. etc. etc.

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  • August 3, 2019 at 12:48 am
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    Kimi is so beautiful

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  • August 3, 2019 at 6:54 am
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    JJ Kelly :'D

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  • August 4, 2019 at 7:40 am
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    She looks like Tom Cruise’s ex wife

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  • August 5, 2019 at 10:09 am
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    Come on… You talk sustainability and then you eat only three selected parts of a whole pig? That's weak (a pig so young has tasty offal meat, shanks you can smoke,…).

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  • August 5, 2019 at 11:33 pm
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    This is how we were all meant to live

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  • August 6, 2019 at 7:45 am
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    Oh please this is all clickbait and you people are suckers. Yeah they had those nice spear guns back in the day huh? Wet suits and weight belts. There is a sucker born every day.

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  • August 6, 2019 at 11:05 am
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    Thank u very much that i did kill u🤮🤮must be kidding me😡

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  • August 6, 2019 at 11:09 am
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    U have upperhand pffff🤮everybody can shoot a poor animal !!! Stupit people.

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  • August 6, 2019 at 5:55 pm
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    So, most Hawaiians are getting lazy in modern times? Or is it the immigrants?

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  • August 7, 2019 at 3:29 am
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    2:49 it looks like there is a skull carved into the rock behind her dad in the picture. Anyone else notice that?

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  • August 7, 2019 at 7:15 am
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    holy molly..!! 90 feet Spear fishing dive ??? that's crazy..

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  • August 7, 2019 at 8:05 am
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    Hafa Adai from Guahan 🙂

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  • August 7, 2019 at 3:49 pm
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    I like, national geografi

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  • August 8, 2019 at 5:52 am
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    Dude i cant even stay for 10sec in water. Respect

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  • August 8, 2019 at 9:26 am
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    100 feet lying on the floor………….i lose my breath when i am in the shower washing my hair and the water is pouring over my face…………..lol……… i figure i could free dive about 3 to 4 feet, then i need Air!

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  • August 8, 2019 at 8:25 pm
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    They have 10 Yeti coolers. I think they can buy anything they want

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  • August 8, 2019 at 9:42 pm
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    wow that's really nice that they pay respect to the animal knowing that they do it for survival not fun

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  • August 10, 2019 at 6:32 am
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    Connecting over conquering

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  • August 10, 2019 at 9:17 am
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    The 2019 population of Hawaii is 1.42 million. Maybe a big part of survival without shipments is to ASAP develop maybe in places farther inland… weather and wave proof (easier said than done but trying to be optimistic) environs to mass cultivate fruits, nuts, and vegetables, and pre-planned logistics to distribute them.

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  • August 10, 2019 at 8:03 pm
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    Is it just me or is this girl super hot?

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  • August 11, 2019 at 5:30 am
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    It's Alive Going Places!!!!!!!

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  • August 11, 2019 at 10:33 am
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    She sure sounds super arrogant for someone that has "inner peace through connection with nature"

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  • August 11, 2019 at 1:18 pm
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    Insufficient resources, humans depleted everything and you're trying to convince them to kill the few last animals we have left? Think about it geez…

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  • August 11, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    If the boats stop coming the planes won't

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  • August 12, 2019 at 12:47 am
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    You would not have oil, would depend on the pig for fat, salt farms, and sugar farms, along with coffee are in Hawaii. With tropical Fruit…that might be the perfect place for surviving.

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  • August 12, 2019 at 7:55 pm
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    Average view count range of NG videos: 20k- 500k. Video on "living off the land" at the time of this writing: 1.6million.

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  • August 13, 2019 at 5:14 am
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    So basically Hawaii was 100% sustainable until the "colonizers" came?

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  • August 13, 2019 at 5:18 am
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    "For us to survive something has to die" uhhh have you heard of fruits and plants? Humans are not made to chew meat.

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  • August 13, 2019 at 2:10 pm
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    I was distracted

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  • August 13, 2019 at 10:48 pm
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    Living of the land with her $500 plus diving get up

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  • August 14, 2019 at 6:34 am
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    She has an amazing skill.

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  • August 14, 2019 at 3:11 pm
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    It's just beautiful,this is real living I grew up feeding myself and family hunting on land and underwater, if you didn't hunt you just don't eat😥

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  • August 15, 2019 at 1:09 am
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    its sad that this current generation takes things for granted. self sufficiency should be taught to all

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  • August 15, 2019 at 5:24 pm
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    Get your facts straight. The wild bore was brought by the first Hawaiians, not by Westerners. Westerners afterwards brought their own pigs, which interbred. But the FIRST pigs were brought by the Polynesians.

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  • August 18, 2019 at 9:23 am
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    I’m in love with her instantly.

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  • August 19, 2019 at 1:35 am
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    She can live that way, but you don't have to kill to survive. Plants give you so much. I have lived on plants and grains for 20 years and never felt better. It would be a different story if there is famine, which can get very ugly. But, I love animals too much to use them for anything except as pets. .

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  • August 19, 2019 at 11:25 am
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    This was worth the watch. Authentic Emotion. So from the spirit.

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