Frostbite Theater presents… Cold Cuts! No baloney! Just science! Hi! I’m Joanna! And I’m Steve! In an earlier experiment, we put dry ice in liquid nitrogen. [Joanna] We found that, while dry ice is cold, it’s still a lot hotter than liquid nitrogen. [Joanna] The ‘hot’ dry ice makes the liquid nitrogen boil faster and the liquid nitrogen makes the dry ice colder. Now, we all know what happens when you put regular dry ice in water. It makes a bunch of cool-looking fog. What’ll happen if we use the super-cold dry ice instead? [Steve] Well… It doesn’t look that much different than the regular dry ice. So, why doesn’t cooling the dry ice make it make more fog? Because cooling it is not the thing to do. [Joanna] Dry ice is normally at its sublimation point, the temperature at which it changes from a solid to a gas. [Joanna] The cold gas then mixes with the surrounding air, cooling it enough to form fog. The super-cold dry ice starts off too cold to sublimate, but the water rapidly warms its surface to the sublimation point. [Joanna] Once the outside gets that warm, it doesn’t act any different than regular dry ice. If your goal is to make a lot of fog, don’t cool down the dry ice. Heat up the water. Then, the dry ice sublimates faster, so it gives off more gas. And, the air above the water contains more water vapor, so it’s easier to make the fog. Thanks for watching! I hope you’ll join us again soon for another experiment! [Cup of Dry Ice] Rattle! Rattle! Rattle! Hahaha! Awww… Spilling dry ice isn’t nearly as fun as spilling liquid nitrogen… Nope! Showoff…

Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water!
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37 thoughts on “Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water!

  • December 18, 2013 at 3:17 pm
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    Haha "show off " 😀

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  • December 18, 2013 at 4:00 pm
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    the video was a little dry, but still cool. see what i did there :p

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  • December 18, 2013 at 4:25 pm
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    God I love these videos.

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  • December 18, 2013 at 5:39 pm
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    Coooool 🙂

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  • December 18, 2013 at 5:43 pm
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    pls dont make so large breaks between your videos… i missed you so much 😉

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  • December 18, 2013 at 6:49 pm
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    I really enjoyed this, please do more =)

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  • December 18, 2013 at 7:36 pm
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    Yeah Frostbite theater is back.

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  • December 18, 2013 at 8:03 pm
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    no audio?

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  • December 18, 2013 at 10:40 pm
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    YAY YOUR BACK

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  • December 18, 2013 at 11:10 pm
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    I agree, Great to see you back on here. My son (13) loves watching your videos and I love watching with him.

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  • December 19, 2013 at 1:23 pm
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    Awesome! "Science rules"

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  • December 20, 2013 at 12:24 am
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    I can't get enough of these videos!! =D

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  • December 20, 2013 at 3:55 am
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    Amazing!

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  • December 20, 2013 at 10:36 pm
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    cold cuts  oooohh bologna

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  • January 2, 2014 at 1:49 am
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    If you love science, raise your hand.

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  • February 11, 2014 at 12:33 am
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    YOU GUYS ARE TOO AWESOME, YOU HELP ME SOMETIMES IN MY SCIENCE CLASS.

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  • February 11, 2014 at 2:47 pm
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    Will you also get more smoke if you break up the dry ice?

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  • March 9, 2014 at 2:54 am
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    you guys should do more videos, they're awesome.

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  • March 13, 2014 at 5:17 am
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    How old is this video? Those computers look pretty old….

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  • March 25, 2014 at 7:35 am
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    hello how are you i've always seen Liquid Nitrogen pourd in to water but i'v never seen water pourd in to Liquid Nitrogen is there a difference and if there is y does it happen

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  • April 22, 2014 at 7:50 pm
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    thank you for telling me 

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  • May 31, 2014 at 3:57 pm
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    I am not sure but what I am sure is Steve ismolder

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  • May 31, 2014 at 3:58 pm
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    I mean older

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  • May 31, 2014 at 8:44 pm
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    does that gas has a certain smell actually? Is it warm or cold?

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  • June 25, 2014 at 5:47 am
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    SUGOI !!! (Amazing!!!)

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  • July 14, 2014 at 12:10 am
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    Dem old mac's in the backround

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  • August 1, 2014 at 12:26 pm
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    What will happen if liquid nitrogen combines with glaciers

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  • September 2, 2014 at 11:18 pm
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    The rapid boiling when the dry ice was first put in the water is probably liquid nitrogen still stuck to the surface boiling off.

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  • September 21, 2014 at 2:36 am
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    I somehow stumbled upon these videos and I love them. I want to play with liquid nitrogen!

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  • October 29, 2014 at 1:37 am
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    is this a good idea 4 halloween?

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  • November 1, 2014 at 7:18 pm
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    Hey jefferson's! i would like to tell you a cool thing. Put a marshmellow in the liquid nitrogen, and after a few seconds, eat it. the effect is amazing!

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  • August 19, 2015 at 5:46 am
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    The heated container looks bigger than the other two. I postulate that the larger surface area produces a greater impact on the creation of the fog than the hotter water.  Please enlighten me.

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  • April 22, 2016 at 11:46 am
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    Whats the temperature of the fog?

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  • May 3, 2016 at 2:12 am
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    You can pour CO2 gas because the gas is heavier than the oxygen around it.

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  • May 30, 2016 at 4:11 pm
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    x clap clap x

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  • November 26, 2016 at 11:37 pm
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    You forgot to tell, if you can drink it after -)

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  • June 9, 2018 at 1:43 am
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    oh wow. i a, educated. that was very helpful. learnt something today.

    Reply

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