Lifetime Outdoor Storage Shed With Wooden Platform (Timelapse)

46 thoughts on “Lifetime Outdoor Storage Shed With Wooden Platform (Timelapse)

  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Hey man great work. I live on long island also and I just purchased the same shed. Im trying to decide how I want the foundation to be . I see you used concrete blocks. How have they held up, meaning any sinkage causing the shed to get thrown off level? im either going with this route or digging down and doing 2' deep concrete footers. also was thinking of laying some gravel and building the base on 2 4×4 skids. whats your thoughts? thanks

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    This video was a huge help, thank you!

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Looks like there is already 5 sheds in that yard. Hey why did you edit the door not closing lol. Good job by the way at least the old man was not following you around on day 2 .

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    I didn’t see him put the shutters on.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    SPECTACULAR JOB!! I gotta build an 8×12.5 this week – this saved a ton of time!

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Thanks for posting! We will make other arrangements for our stuff. Great job!

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Why would 54 scumbags vote thumbs down…? This guy worked his a.. off ! People can be such jerks. 🙁 As for me – Nice job Long Island Pro. 🙂

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    I wonder if you need a permit for one of those sheds

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Was that an electric framing nailer?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    How much should I pay a handy man to build a 8×12.5?
    Thanks

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    The instructions are very long, not so clear and complicated – longer than 100 pages. If you are used to assembling IKEA furnitures, be cautious. This is not that simple as it looks on the video. Things don’t fit together well and some panels are warped (these are plastic parts). If you don’t finish it all, it may be knocked down by wind. My husband and his friends spent days to put it together and still working on it. Another person has the exact same model (he is a professional assembly technician) and he too said he has been working on it for a long time and still has a long way to go. One more thing. I don’t know how this man works by himself but this takes minimum 2 men. If finished, I am sure I will enjoy it though. The process is not. You might consider paying extra for professional assembly.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Whats the width x length of the shed?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Wow, this is great! I'm planning on getting this exact same shed and so glad you are available to come out to California, set the foundation and build it for me at no cost. 🙂 I'm not quite as handy with a nail gun and level, but you make it look pretty simple so I'm going to give it a go. Thanks and I may not have pulled the trigger without this informative video!

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Is there an order to setting up the floor aside from the end pieces? I'm having trouble getting the walls to fit. Could you give me some input?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Copy of my Amazon shed review below …..
    My wife loves her many craft projects, and over the years she had gotten to the point where the house was chocked full of her "valuable" stuff. About four years after moving to a smaller house, we bought this shed kit so I could erect her a cute little "Yarn Barn" in our tiny side yard.
    I'm somewhat handy with tools, but I'm certainly ignorant on frame construction ….. etc, so it was helpful to have a step by step guide. One person can truly put this thing together alone, and although the directions tell you to gather friends and neighbors for the job, I must admit that I'm glad I took my time and allowed myself to carefully consider every step.
    I would warn that this is no weekend fling, but for this retired music teacher, it turned out to be a very slow moving but enjoyable and satisfying project. I conservatively estimate that it took about 30-40 hours total over 2-3 weeks … perhaps even longer. No way can it be done for the first time in 5-6 hours by a crew of four. Perhaps that would be true by a crew of professional assemblers, but seeing that written in the assembly booklet just made me laugh out loud!
    First, you need to construct a level base on which to construct the kit. This was new ground for me, so I went on YouTube and watched 3-4 videos of people building wooden decks for their garden sheds. You really must have a deck or concrete slab, since the shed bottom isn't rigid enough for you to simply set it up on strategically placed concrete blocks. Perhaps it was overkill, but I screwed together a 2 X 6 frame on which I screwed down a deck of 5/8" plywood sheathing. I dug holes for footings and filled them with gravel, on which I put small concrete blocks. It is all important that this base ends up being strong and level, since the kit requires this. Those Youtube videos really helped me bigtime, since I had never constructed any kind of deck before. Although this frame and deck can be fastened with nails, I was glad that I predrilled some pilot holes when needed and used construction screws, since I ended up having to dismantle and move the whole thing a year later, when my wife and I ended up moving. (see below)
    Actual construction of the shed kit is straight forward, and the directions are quite clear. Lifetime has a very helpful series of videos on Youtube that show every step, so if you're not sure that you can handle this, go and check them out before ordering. (Enter something like "Lifetime shed kit" in Youtube and you'll probably end up finding it.) I think that you'll be pleasantly surprised. During assembly, there are times when it helps to have somebody hold up panels before they are screwed into place, but I found it was a whole lot less complicated to use step ladders and saw horses as my assistants. These helpers were much quieter and more patient than humans, and they allowed my mind to proceed through each step uninterrupted. Having a good battery powered variable speed drill was also very helpful, but the process really only involves screwing the provided fasteners into the well located factory drilled holes. I just followed the steps in the directions. At times, the panels ended up needing to be wrestled into place so that the pre-drilled holes lined up properly. Things certainly didn't just fall into place the way that they did in the Lifetime Youtube video, but nothing ended up having to be modified or altered. A few times, the rubber mallet that I had helped things along, and I did my share of sweating and cursing. The real discomfort is the suspense that one naturally feels after spending a load of money on something that could potentially prove to be beyond one's abilities. I must say …… there were a few scary moments.
    I ran into several minor snags during construction, so I got to test out Lifetime's phone based customer service department a bit. I must say that they were fantastic! I don't recall waiting all that long for help, and their knowledgeable staff gave me all the time that I needed to keep me on track. First, the assembly brochure mentions an add on kit that strengthens the roof for a heavy snow-load, and since I live in CT, I figured that might be a prudent move. I had to stop for a few days while Lifetime sent me those parts. Also, toward the end, I called again when the front doors wouldn't close properly. The customer service phone rep asked me a few brilliant questions, and he ended up mailing me a free alternate door jamb thingy which corrected the situation. Come to think of it, this product knowledge and ready assistance was first rate, and I can't say enough about Lifetime's support! This corrective part also took a few days to arrive, and that slowed things down a little. That was OK with me. The 62 year old man needed a break by then. However, these delays are just another reminder that you don't want to construct these kind of kits on a tight schedule.
    After about one year of use, we unexpectably ended up moving across the state to live nearer to our son's growing family. When we put our house up for sale, we realized that the shed wouldnt end up adding any real value, so I decided to disassemble, move and eventually reassemble the "Yarn Barn" on our new property. I kept the steel trusses intact, and they all just slipped out easily for compact stacking during moving. Keeping the trusses assembled helped save a lot of time, and I'm pretty sure that I took the thing apart in one day. The screws backed out of the holes easily, and the panels came apart very quickly. I stacked everything up and put it under a tarp until the movers loaded it on their truck a few weeks later. When we got to our new house, I had a garage where I stored the wooden and metal parts under cover, while I just stacked the plastic panels outdoors, figuring that I would reassemble everything withing a month or two. One year later (LOL!), I finally got to this project, praying that my "Lifetime" plastic would hold its shape after standing uncovered in the sun, rain, snow and ice of four New England seasons. Water had gotten inside the open screw holes, and I worried that things had surely gotten twisted and distorted from the freezing and thawing.
    It took me quite a bit of time to reassemble, close to about 2/3 of the original setup time. Even though I had originally installed the screws quite tightly with a variable speed drill, they tightened up well once again during reassembly. I set up the shed again on the same wooden deck, and I was happy that the entire frame and decking for the base was held together with construction wood screws. That had allowed me to also dissasemble, move and reassemble the deck along with the shed. I put it back together using the original assembly booklet, and once again, as needed during the original assembly, I ended up calling Lifetime's customer service for some assistance during door alignment. It should be noted that even two years later, Lifetime's customer service staff were quick and eager to help me out, even though they had info in their file proving that I had bought the shed long ago. Impressive customer service by phone and email!
    So, my wife has now restocked her "Yarn Barn" in the new location, and our house is much less clogged with her tools of creativity. Writing this review took quite a while, but hey …… I'm a retired old guy who enjoys sitting here on a rainy day, and Lifetime has produced a product that deserves my efforts. Here's hoping that your shed-building project has as satisfying an ending as our's has.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    I would have waited till spring. Glad I live in California. Thank for the video

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Thanks for the video. I just got the 8 x 12 version. I'm going back and forth in regards to the foundation. I noticed you have just used cinder blocks. I'm curious. How has that held up so far with the frost heaves? Have you had to make any adjustments? Thanks

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Why did you run the plywood grain parallel joists and not perpendicular ? I looked at lifetime’s manual and they show running parallel. Less cuts and using full sheets is the only thing I can figure out. Cool video, nice job!

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    👍❤🏠

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Might you have a materials list for the foundation…just the platform

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Most frustrating thing I have ever put together !!!! Had to hire someone to finish it

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Beware, Instructions are difficult to follow. They don’t tell you until you have the shed unpacked that it needs to be put on a concrete or wood foundation. Wished ZI would not have purchased it.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    I'd like to put in some electric, plumbing, and drywall; then put my mother-in-law back there.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    how much the labor cost

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Great video! I’m a DIY’er, installing the 15×8 shed this weekend. Quick question, what nail gun did you use? Is it an electric Milwaukee? Framing nails?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    hi Mike: Very interesting video. I do furniture & equipment assembly. I estimate I have done around 10 of these types of sheds, but never this one. I downloaded the manual. In the manual, it calls for 3 people at certain steps. So, impressive that you got this done solo. Also gives me confidence that I can get my pending assembly of this model done with just one helper.
    Clearly, you have done things out of sequence from the manual. It would be nice if you talked about that. I liked the trick with the ratchet cable. Wondering if there are any other tricks I did not catch.
    Also, your video does not show the installation of the shelves. I'm kind of wondering if the long shelves have a dual function, and add some structural support? Thanks, Reese Turbin, October 23, 2017

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    How long did this take real-time to build?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    I own an Acre of land, out of the city limits, so I am sure it will be OK to build one. I look forward to getting my shed built!! I will try and setup lighting inside. I have solar panels available where I can put Free lighting inside. Which will be Awesome!!!!

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    im thinking of buying a 8×8 .do I need to anchor it down on the wood platphom

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    I should had known….I realize I'm a fool to think plastic will hold its form/shape even with today's techknowledgey. It did not from the start and it only got worst since october 2016.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    hi Michael, very nice video and good work , especially in the windy and chill weather. May i ask what kind of screws/nails and sizes you used to build the wood base and anchor the shed's plastic base to the plywoodbase? I am building one wood base using treated woods and then will put the shed on top of it as you did. Can you give me some advises about the screw type and size?
    thanks

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Dang…it looks cold! It snowed over night? The sky was so blue on day 1.
    Thank you for this wonderful video. My husband and I will be putting up an 8×15 and an 8×10 (we can't exceed 200 sq feet of "out buildings" without a permit in our county in So. Calif.)
    and my husband wants to do the wood platform option to have the shed up a bit and to allow for rain drainage (when/if we have rain in So. Calif! LOL).
    I showed him your video and he wants to go that route.
    Great job!

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    I cannot get the walls to slide into their spots! Is there a trick? I've pounded with a rubber mallet until it's dented the side and the bottom "nubs" still won't slide all the way over into their slits 🙁

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    How much should I charge to build one?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Do these sheds some with any conduit or grommets for running romex?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    This shed will arrive on Friday for me. I've purchased all the supplies ready to build the same wood foundation. What I see is about 6 inches left on each side of the shed. Will the subfloor rot if its left uncovered like that ?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    I have a question. This is a plastic thing, does it last lifetime? Is there any insulation inside the plastic panels of wall and roof?

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    I put up a 12' X 12' version of this. The real problem I think a lot of people experience with it is that what they perceive as "instructions" are not really instructions. They are more of an assembly drawing. It shows how it goes together but not a true step by step "slot A into slot B" set of instructions. In other words, you see how each figure goes but you have to figure out for yourself the best way to accomplish getting it that way. For instance, they illustrate the way trusses and the interior wall ribs go together but if you assemble the trusses and attach them to the wall ribs first, it is difficult as hell to get them into position without bending everything and hurting yourself. It's okay to assemble the ribs to the walls first then assemble the trusses in place. If you use the assembly drawing as a "guide" instead of instructions this can be an easy task.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    All done took me 30 hours, could have been less, learn by trial and error…Now I got it memorized now.. charging $1 grand labor, supplies for the sub'flooring… Thanks, bro!

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    … great effort for an otherwise frustrating project because the instructions as in like most of these do yourself sheds are poorly to mediocre written or translated from who know what language leaving much for one to figure out and a minimal of photos or descent spec drawings to show details and usually at the most critical areas …. One observation, we would of used treated plywood and 90 degree flashing all the way around beyond the shed base footprint. Moisture on non ground contact rated pressure treated lumber will rot within 4-5 years and too, if the screws are not stainless or epoxy coated will rust as well where the water will wick back & under the shed base and find it's way into the penetrations made by the nails or screws securing the plywood sheets …

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Just getting ready to start this project for my girlfriend. Thanks for doing this video, it helps a lot. Boy, those winds were howling.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    Thanks bro I am doing this tomorrow….

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  • July 31, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    So all in all without the time lapse, how long did it actually take?

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