skate skiing which is sometimes called free technique is one of two major disciplines of cross-country skiing the other is called classic skiing and it's the more traditional style skate skiing is done on wide groomed trails outside of the classic ski tracks you can also skate ski on roller skis roller skiing is an excellent approximation of skating on snow and a great option for enjoying the sport year-round aside from when you're going straight downhill skate skis are always positioned in a v-shape with the tails closer together than the tips a skate skier uses the inside edge of the ski to push forward the push with the ski is called a skate push a kick or a lake push it all means the same thing trained to skate skiers have a large repertoire of techniques to use in different situations Ski techniques are like gears on a bike you switch between techniques as your speed changes you can enjoy an enormous improvement in efficiency just by learning the full range of techniques and understanding how each technique is modified in different situations next I'll give you a quick video rundown of the five primary skate skiing techniques and explain how they fit on the speed continuum we have video courses where one of my partners Chris Jeffries who's a Canadian national level high performance director and former Olympian explains in depth the mechanics of each technique as demonstrated by Canadian national team athletes you can visit accesskey nation.com if you'd like to learn more so the first technique on the spectrum is diagonal skate it's an uphill technique that's great to know when you're getting started but becomes less relevant as your skills improve instead you'll use offset to climb Hills more efficiently you can identify offset by the staggered arm position and the way the two poles plant at the same time as one ski next in the lineup is one's gate a few years ago it would have been considered best suited to flats and gentle hills but the trend at the moment is to use it increasingly on up hills as well once you're moving too fast for one's gate it's time for to skate to skate is a good technique for after you've built up speed on the flats or are skiing down a gradual slope free skate is the last of the five core techniques it's good for when you're moving too fast to use your poles so to recap skate techniques generally work like this to skate is used at high speeds such as on flats and slight down hills one skate is the most versatile technique and can be used on flats gentle down hills and depending on your strength and skill even on up hills free skate is the high speed technique for when you're moving too fast to use your poles offset is the primary uphill technique diagonal skate is also an uphill technique and can be a real lifesaver for getting up hills without completely flat lining you should aim to be competent in every skate technique but in terms of usage offset in one's gait are most used and should be your primary focus especially in your early days the final thing I want to mention is that it's best to avoid thinking in absolutes when it comes to cross-country skiing techniques many of the features of technique per adjustable when you look at a video of an expert skier or a ski race keep in mind that most aspects of technique are influenced by the snow conditions terrain and the skiers objectives on top about ski techniques follow trends and devolve over time there's enough nuance in this sport to keep it interesting and challenging for a lifetime and all that just adds to the enjoyment and pleasure of skate skiing

Introduction to Skate Skiing Techniques

2 thoughts on “Introduction to Skate Skiing Techniques

  • July 31, 2019 at 9:09 am
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    Thanks this helped me a lot.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 9:09 am
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    When xc ski racing should you use v2 or v2 alternate?

    Reply

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