hey what's up everybody I'm Tommy and today I want to tell you about this miniature table saw sled that I have built so it's a lot like a normal table saw sled except that it's much smaller I'm really happy with how this thing turned out I used a piece of oak here on the bottom so that it would be more stable and it would sit inside the slot nicely it'd be more precise and unfortunately I actually cut the piece of oak a little too small I kept trimming and trimming and trimming and I over trimmed it so I put a piece of tape on this side and this tape measures four thousandths in thickness and when I tried to put a piece of tape on the other side it would no longer install into this slot so now the amount of play this thing house is somewhere between one and four thousandths which I think it's pretty good I was a little bit worried that the tape was gonna make it bind in the slot but that hasn't been the case at all it's been fine and every now and then I wax the bottom of the sled and the table top and the tape as well and everything that's been working just really great and so now I'm just gonna do a test cut and show you show you how it works so as you can see it slides just fine in the slot and and it makes really nice and square cuts now if you were to look at this over you know maybe two or three feet then maybe you would start to detect some some out of squareness in this in this cut but for my purposes the sorts of things I normally cut I mean this is incredibly square and this is going to make just perfect joints usually the the longest boards I would be cutting on this sled or the widest boards I would be cutting on this sled would be about six inches because my jointer has a six inch limit but anyway in this video I'm just going to show you how I went about building this thing so I squared up the piece of oak by taking it to the jointer squaring a face in an edge and then taking it to the planer then I started working on the MDF so this is just a laminated piece of MDF and I worked at number one squaring it up and number two getting it down to the approximate size that I was gonna need for the sled I didn't want to get it down to the tiniest size just yet because I wanted to make sure I didn't make it too small so I just got it close then I took a piece of Douglas fir and started trimming it down to the approximate size I wanted for the fence after I had it down to the approximate size I headed over to the jointer and the planer to make sure it was squared up I measured the depth of the slot on my table saw and then plane to the oak down until it was the right size I planed it down until it was slightly smaller than the depth of the slot I didn't actually want it to hit bottom I took the piece that was to be the fence and measured out the approximate length that I wanted for the fence I just wanted to make sure I didn't get any knots included in there then I squared it up on the miter saw I checked the depth of the fence and decided that it was taller than I was ever gonna need it to be so I made my marks and then trimmed that down on the table saw after that I just kind of put everything loosely together to get a feel for it then I moved back to working on the piece of oak and trimming it down to the correct width for the slot this is where I kind of went overboard and I trimmed it just a little too much but I had already used up pretty much the entire piece of oak in the planning and jointing process so I had to work with what I had when I thought it was fitting pretty good I decided to put a little bit of wax on it to see if that would help it slide more smoothly and a did a fine job I then picked the most consistent portion of the piece of oak to use as the actual rail I determine where I wanted the rail to be and made some marks and started going about setting that in place the easiest solution I found was just to clamp my speed square in place and use that to but the rail up against and that seemed to work pretty well after I had everything clamped up I drilled some pilot holes and of course counter bores to make sure that the heads were sunken below the surface of the rail I drove the screws by hand because I didn't want to risk over driving them and either splitting the piece of oak or having this group poked through the top side of the sled once I had the rail attached I tried it in the slot and it started feeling like the sled was still a little too big so I made some adjustments and trimmed it down the size then I trim the sled so that it had a zero clearance with the blade itself I wasn't quite sure how it was gonna make sure that the fence was 100% Square to the blade then I got the idea to clamp my speed square to the blade itself once I clamped it up and squared the fence itself up to the speed square and pull the sled back to meet it it actually met perfectly flush so it felt like there was no adjustment that was gonna need to be made meaning I could just make sure that the fence was completely flush with the backside of the table saw sled and it should be 100% square so that's what I did I just clamped everything up and kept checking and checking and checking to make sure that the fence of the table saw sled was completely flush with the back of the table saw sled and again I just kept tweaking it and tweaking it until I made sure that it was perfect and then I clamped everything in place and drove a couple screws just to hold the fence there I thought it was possible that I might have to come back and adjust the fence where in which I could just remove one of the screws and then move it if necessary but as you'll see later in the video that wasn't needed at all after the fence was attached I distribute so that it also had a zero clearance with blade then I put a coat of wax on everything that made contact with anything else it really started moving nicely then that was pretty much it for the sled at that point I just started doing different types of test cuts to see what I could pull off with it and see how accurate it was and as it turned out I didn't really need to adjust the fence at all I was getting really nice and square cuts in that initial orientation and the final test was to use the sled to do a tenon to fit a mortise just to see if I could I was able to pull it off but it wasn't perfect I think the limiting factor in this situation though is my table saw itself because it doesn't have a blade depth lock and that affected the tenon but overall it worked out okay so again I'm really happy with how this thing turned out it's really small easily managed I can hide it away quickly store it away quickly and and it's just worked out great it's not perfect but it does a really good job for the minimal amount of time I've put into creating it anyway I hope you enjoyed this video if you did please give it a thumbs up and if you haven't already be sure to subscribe until next time I hope you have fun building something

How to make a Miniature Table Saw Sled

23 thoughts on “How to make a Miniature Table Saw Sled

  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    How was that 90? The front of the speed square flat was on the side of the blade and the back flat was on the Kerf (teeth) of the blade! Am I missing something here!!???

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    PARABÉNS, quanta habilidade e carinho, vi e aprendi, adoro trabalhar com madeira, faço como hobby, nesse momento estou fazendo algumas casinhas para abelhas jataí e presenteando os amigos para espalhar essa ideia de proteção as abelhas!
    Abraço aqui do Brasil 🇧🇷

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    That's it! Seen enough, I'm subscribing!

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Hi Tommy I like your videos. Great job 👍

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Hello Tommy , this little cute jig is really looking sweet. I did build the 20×20 cm or 8×8 inch mini version with a tiny stop-block. The only drawback is with little small cuts ( 1 cm or half inch ). They are sliding away and sometimes not perfect square cut. How to add a mini holder. Any good idea or do you think you should add more little useful parts to your cute small sweet jig ?
    Thanks for sharing 🙂 You are missing out one critical jig from your DIY List after your DIY Drill Powered Disc Sander ? Guess what ? DIY DRILL STAND for perfect 90 degrees drilling. I have been on market lately , even the cheap ones ( drill stands ) cost more than 60 dollars. All Best and Keep Up The Cute Great Learning Videos 🙂

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Hi mate ! Nice videos… one thing. That is not MDF !

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Is that a plastic table saw? Boy i've seen it all.

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    I love your Videos, they are very easy to follow, and it helps create tools I can not currently afford. Any chance you could do a video on how to build a table saw with a circular saw? Or do you know of a video that makes one that works?

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Safety glasses?

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    A Macgyver fix…just add tape to make it work right!! 😉

    Love your videos and thanks for sharing this!!

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    nylon is a better option for a track guide.

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Clamping the speed square is a super idea! Nice vid.

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Good video—thanks.

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    My question is what if you don't have a planer or joiner? They're expensive and I simply cannot justify the cost of buying them.

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Any concerns about the offcuts not being supported on their side? I'm considering building a similar sled but my offcuts will likely be quite large and I think I'd worry about the blade being pinched.

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Well i mean support at cut area where blade is….

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Ha ha yes ur shop stuff"……ive always been taught that when u cut material u should always have material with support underneath to make cut cleaner and more accurate and more safe……whenever possible….and with your design there is zero support at cut off piece area..its floating in space

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Fyi..love ur equipment..

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Go see the link i sent… With that version u can cut smaller materials safely ….and also wont damage material at end of cut like urs can and prob does….just giving u input….your video sparked my desire to make a mini one….i just dont feel ur design is for me…so thanks

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Im making a simple larger sled now…but hey it may work fine but mechanically speaking it can be unsafe since the cutoff portion is floating in air with no support….this can be dangerous….it may work fine for 1000 times but maybe not 1001 times….

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    To me its a very unsafe design but maybe im wrong…..

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    Nice idea but i dont like the fact that its elevated where cut part of wood is and could be very dangerous at end of cut since there is nothing under the wood to support it

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  • June 18, 2019 at 12:40 am
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    I have a Dewalt contractor's saw as well. Mind sharing the brand name of the wax you use on yours? Thnx Tommy!

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