his gaiters my name is Sonic I'm here with in moose skates and if you're like me you probably love to skate I like to do all kinds of skating so that includes Street / urban / free ride and clewd slalom includes speed skating and it even includes a little bit of aggressive skating so with so many different kinds of skating we got different kinds of equipment different boots different frames different wheels and let's make sense of it all so let's get into that let's start off with different kinds of boots for your skates and depending on the kind of skating you do you're gonna use a different boot so very common boot used by many skaters is like a freeride / urban / recreational boot and this is kind of like your rollerblade twister or your FRX fr1 from fr / Seba and then you got your next model from powerslide so kind of a model there that covers everything but isn't really specialized next up we have something like this this is the fr Egor this is a very it's a slalom skate it's made for freestyle made for going around cones so you can see it's got a lot of support here so you can do those crazy one wheel tricks like the famous Alex from in MOOCs gates and you can you know really have that control in there so freestyle / urban skate or for slalom more so next up we have speed skate you'll notice that it's much sleeker made to go fast and these things are usually made all of carbon fiber and they have a low cut boot so these aren't so good for doing other kinds of skating that kind of more specialized for speed and personally I'm not even a fan of having this low cut boot even when I do racing but it seems to work for a lot of speed skaters especially those with great technique now here's something looks a little different this is an aggressive skate it's made kind of to be built like a tank and this thing's made for jumps it's made for grinds it's made for all sorts of cool tricks there notice with aggressive skates in addition to having a lot of shock absorption in there they have this thing called Sol plates and this helps with tricks so you could do stuff like grinds so excellent for that application after that we have roller hockey skates these are kind of very minimal Spartan skates designed off of ice skates but they work for a lot of different kinds of skating including like urban and slalom if you're not getting too advanced with them quite yet so very neat stuff really easy to find in shops especially in the US last stop you sometimes have hybrid skates so this is a skate that actually this is my own skate it's a prototype I had designed I call it the chimera skate because it's a blend of different kinds of skates so it's very much like a speed skate but it also has a cuff so I can do slalom and urban skating in it for a skate similar to this you can check out the sewol marathon which is highly recommended by any of my friends now in addition to different kinds of skates you have the material of the skates the lower end less expensive skates they tend to use plastic shells and which are kind of more padding they're heavier but they don't cost as much and then on the higher end skates especially skates have carbon material all around and especially for high end slalom skates also carbon fiber this material is great because it's super stiff super responsive and gives you really great performance it also costs a little more so something to consider in terms of materials in price now before we start talking about frames and wheel configurations we need to talk about how the boots and the frames attached to each other because there's a few different standards by the way they connect to each other and we call these mounting systems so you can see here that the boot and the frame they attach to each other with these bolts here and that's one style of mounting system and we'll go through each of them now the first system we'll talk about is the 165 mounting system and this is very commonly used for slalom skates a lot of recreational skates and even some older speed skates that have smaller wheels now the reason it's called 165 is because there's a hundred and sixty five millimeters between the front mounting position in the back mounting position so you can see from this hole to that hole you also notice that there's a little bit of a lift here at the heel of compared to the front just common for the 165 mounting system next up we have the 195 mounting system this is used on most speed skating boots today to accommodate larger wheels so 195 means there's a hundred and ninety five millimeters from the front mounting block to the rear mounting block and to do this because this second wheel wouldn't work with the 165 mounting block which would be right here in the way so speed skating frame and boots have moved the mounting block up forward to accommodate larger wheels great next up we have the u FS mounting system now unlike 165 and 195 where there's a little bit of lift on the heel this is completely flat so it mounts straight to the bottom of the boot and aggressive boots you know tend to be very flat across the bottom to make them more stable and good for jumps and stuff something interesting to note is that the two mounting holes here are 165 millimeters apart so it is possible to create adapters between different systems next up we have the Trinity system this system has one two three mounting points instead of two which is what all the other ones had this is new and from powerslide so you'll get only get powerslide frames for now that have it and it worked mostly with powerslide only boots but it's a cool system because you got this extra mounting point and you have this area free so like 165 195 there's a little bit of a lift here in the back though not as much and because of this system you could have any wheel configuration so here I've got a four by eighty but you could also have something like three by 125 or even a four by 110 or three by hundred and it's a really close system so still kind of new and has a few imperfections but really cool system once I think we get some more frames for the market lastly I want to speak about other systems so we have ones that are just kind of fixed onto the skates over here you can see these are riveted right onto the skate this is common among roller hockey skates regardless of low end or high end it's also common among lower ends recreational skates where they just kind of attach the skate so you can't really do too much with it you can't adjust it you can't change the frame but what you see is what you get great moving on to frames let's start with the different materials frames are made of so here we have a flat frame made of like a plastic material and this is common among aggressive because they they slide better compared to metal and it's also used just in lower end skates in general there they flex a bit but not as responsive they also cost a lot less so that's plastic frames the most common frame material is aluminum and this comes in different versions so a lot of lower end skates that have a mid end skate so of 6000 series aluminum which is slightly softer more forgiving ride but less responsive then higher end skates will have 7000 series aluminum so that you'll see more on the slalom skates and even speed skates which is a stiffer metal responds better but less responsive to that less less comfortable on the road potentially there's also the amount of material so you can see there's a lot of material on these frames which are used for urban skating more more pounding coming to this stage then speed skin you can see it cut out a lot of material so much lighter and you can't really be joke doing jumps and stuff on them the last material and this is kind of newer is a carbon fiber so this is super super lightweight it's also very stiff and very responsive but you have to be kind of careful with them because they could shatter and depending on the design of the skate it can be better or worse but here they've got some metal in here on the mounting points to strengthen it so that's materials next up we'll talk about frame length wheel size accommodation and wheel configurations so here we have a frame that's got 76 millimeter wheels in it and four of them and the frame is called a 231 that means 231 millimeters from the first bolt to the last bolt it accommodates for 76 millimeter wheels here we have a 243 millimeter frame and it accommodates 80 millimeter wheels so a little more space to get bigger wheels but the wheels are very close to each other here we have something different it's three wheels instead of four wheels which gives you a bit more speed and it's a lot of fun but they're slightly less stable on the road because there's more gap between the wheels and you only have three points of contact on the ground instead of four funny thing here is these wheels are hundred millimeters but the length is same as a 231 frame so you can see very cool bigger wheels but still the same length so something like this is still very maneuverable but gives you speed at the same time the three wheels kids are getting very popular for urban skating though they're just not as good for slalom in my experience from here we got for the speed frames much bigger length normally speed frames are measured in in inches so this one is a 13.3 inch frame to accommodate four wheels of a hundred and ten millimeters and there's also shorter frames for smaller wheels blast off we have 125 millimeter wheels and these are big big frames but they can come in different lengths especially at 303 wheel versions they can make them longer which is the case for speed but they're also for urban skating 125 millimeter wheels but smaller frames to allow for some maneuverability now let's talk about some wheel configurations on the boots so we're gonna talk about something called flat rocker and anti rocker for flat we have basically all the wheels are touching the ground at the same time they all make contact with the ground this is most common among the urban skate speed skates a lot of skating you have a flat set up this is a very stable setup it gives you a lot of speed and it gives you a medium amount of maneuverability when it comes to motion so that's a flat set up next up we have a rockered setup a rockered set up is where the front and the back wheel are not touching the ground you could also have a front rocker setup or only the front wheel isn't touching the ground what this gives you is more maneuverability when it comes to skating so this is really good for slalom or for doing kind of more trick and stylistic skating this is less stable when it comes to high speed or urban skating so you want to think about which application you want if you're like me and you like to do both flat and rockered skating then there are some skates that come with these bolts and you could see it's offset here so the center of the bolt is up here if you want to say one set up and then you can move it down to this other set up so it's a two piece axle and that goes right into the frame depending on the model of the frame it's a very cool option for those who want to do both next we have something called an anti rocker setup so for aggressive escapes where rocker Inge might be smaller wheel on the on the front and larger in the middle for aggressive skates they have a large emile on the end and a smaller wheel in the middle this makes this gates more stable and less likely to turn when you land but it also means with a smaller wheel here which tends to be a harder material you got more space to do grinds and less likely to catch your wheels when doing things like that one other thing to note is some wheel configurations will give you a flat set up but still have different wheel sizes that we call that a high-low set this is in this case there's 276 millimeters here in to 80 millimeters here but these two bolts are actually lower by a couple millimeters so they all line up on the ground that's called the high-low so the advantages is it lets you get the skate closer to the ground to get a little more stability and maneuverability so this is very common on roller hockey skates you'll also see it on some speed skating frames in this case they got 100 100 hundred but only a 90 over here so you can see that this bolt is a little lower than the others and their space over here so it's still a flat set up but you get a lower center of gravity for more control in skating let's talk about wheels now the first thing you'll notice is wheels come in all sorts of different sizes so you got something as little as forty seven millimeters which is used when anti-racketeering aggressive skates and you got something as big as 125 millimeters which is used for speed and distance skating and in between we have 110 hundred eighty and sixty and then even more sizes in between they're now commonly aggressive skates use smaller wheels urban escapes you thing in between and speeds getting to use bigger wheels so that was your sizes smaller wheels respond a little better they're more maneuverable and bigger wheels roll faster so there's your trade off with your wheel size the next thing to talk about is the shape of the wheel so we come in different sizes and in different shapes so here we have something that's more we call a bullet profile very typical for speed skates and recreation skates if you're doing slalom you can have something that's even a little more rounded so you can get more on the edges and stuff and for aggressive skating you tend to have something that's very flat so it's more stable they don't do so much turning and it's good for like just that kind of stability in place wheels also come in different hardnesses so some wheels are super hard like this aggressive wheel because it's good for sliding you want to slide more softer wheel will grip more but they'll wear out a little faster so for safe skating in the rain you might have something like this which is an MPC storm surge wheel super grippy in the rain but it doesn't roll as well either the harder wheels tend to roll better the next thing is also the rebound effect so wheels depending on the quality of your thing they bounce better or worse so depending on the better the wheel the better the rebound so that's something to keep in mind so you get more inertia and more kinetic energy coming out of the wheel one last thing to mention is some wheels come with two kinds of urethane so they'll have like a soft urethane inside to get extra rebound and responsiveness and then they have a hard urethane on outside so here's an example of a wheel that I've loved to death and worn out and you can see I've worn out the first level of urethane which is the hard stuff and inside you can see a softer urethane so pretty cool technology in the works thank you for watching guys my name is sonic for more videos check out the youtube channel for in moose skates and subscribe thanks guys

HOW TO CHOOSE INLINE SKATES / ROLLERBLADES: BOOT, FRAMES, WHEELS for your skating style

3 thoughts on “HOW TO CHOOSE INLINE SKATES / ROLLERBLADES: BOOT, FRAMES, WHEELS for your skating style

  • June 17, 2019 at 9:41 am
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    This is so cool, thank you.

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 9:41 am
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    I'd love a dedicated video about Sonic's chimera boot.

    I've been doing urban for 5 years, progressively becoming more and more concerned about speed. Currently in gutted Seba iGors with Intuitions and swapping between 4×100, 4×110, and 3×125. I've been eyeing speed skates to add to my quiver, but have been curious about modding on a cuff very similar to the chimera.

    Thanks for any insight!

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 9:41 am
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    Great Job!! Tks

    Reply

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