Oh what's going on guys I'm Connie Brooke welcome back to another crafty workshop video this week's video I'm going to show you how I built this super comfortable modern and ironic chair let's go and get started with a project before we get started I just want I mentioned in this video sponsored by brands of Matic and you'll hear more about them later in the video I decided to kind of experiment on this project with some wood I'd never worked with before and that's thermally modify – so after seeing it at my local lumber and woodworking store Nashville Hardware I knew I wanted to use it on a project and this Adirondack chair was really kind of the perfect choice so thermally modified woods are essentially cooked at a high temperature around 400 degrees and this process makes the wood pretty much impervious to rot and bug damage and the process also makes the wood more dimensionally stable and all of these factors make thermally modified woods a great choice for outdoor projects and best of all to me there are no chemicals involved like with pressure treated lumber and I know this might sound like a commercial it's really not I just think thermally modified wood is kind of a cool new choice for outdoor projects so anyway after picking up the ash I broke down the boards into their rough lengths at the miter saw and bandsaw and then jointed one face and one edge at the jointer and this probably wasn't necessary since these boards were already s3s but I also wanted to bring the thickness down a bit after joining the boards I ran them through the planer to bring the other face into parallel and bring the board's down to their final thickness three-quarters of an inch next I started working on the metal framework that will add some support to the arms and back of the chair and I started with aluminum but ended up running into some issues trying to braise the aluminum which you'll see here in a second so I cut the aluminum to link that the miter saw and then beveled the edges and into the pieces with a file and this bevel will allow more of the brazing material to be added to the joint which in theory should make the joint stronger once the pieces were beveled I cleaned them up with a wire brush and then I could get too brazen so I was initially gonna use this awesome fireball square to hold the pieces in place but thankfully remember that these squares are also made of aluminum and I definitely didn't want raising material ending up on the square so I changed tactics and clamp the pieces together applying clamping pressure right at the corner where I'd be brazing which I quickly realized was a mistake alright so as you guys might have noticed I started to have some difficulty there with the brazing and so there were a few issues first of all when you're heating up the aluminum to the point where it's gonna melt that brazing rod on contact when aluminum gets that hot it also becomes pretty pliable especially thin walled tubing like this aluminum so my first try I had the claiming pressure kind of across the sidewalls of the tubing and it just slowly started to squish the tubing which obviously is not good so I changed my clamping strategy and thought things would get a little bit better but then the other issue I ran into is that since I really needed to braze both sides at least both phases of this joint to make it strong enough because I was applying so much heat to those joints the previous joint that I had just braised would have a tendency to just kind of open up when I was doing the other joints no I basically just decided to scrap the brazing idea and move on to a process I'm a lot more comfortable with and that I've had a lot of success with in the past and that is copper soldering so you guys might have seen my liftop coffee table video that turned out great it was much simpler very easy to work with and actually the copper for this build is cheaper than the aluminum in this case so I think switching the copper is gonna be the way to go so let's go ahead and get started with that after picking up some 3/4 inch copper tubing I got to work cutting the pieces to length and this process is super simple using one of these pipe cutters and you can get surprisingly accurate results with one of these tools basically you mark the length of your piece line up the cutting wheel with your mark and then slowly add more pressure as you spin the tool around the pipe and eventually the cutter works its way through the pipe and you get a nice clean cut and I just kept cutting my pieces down until I had all my parts and the pieces for this build came out pretty much perfectly from a 10-foot length of tubing before getting the soldering I needed to remove all the barcode stickers from the elbows which came off easily enough with a scraper and some goof-off to prep the parts for soldering I first used this wire rush to abrade the surface of the ends of the tubing as well as the inside of the elbows next I applied some flux to the end of the tubing and you really don't need a ton of flux here after applying the flux I push the tubing into the elbow making sure it's seated fully and then wiped off any excess flux so to solder copper you want to heat up the joint until the flux melts and then basically wipe the solder across the tubing until it melts and flows into the joint and the solder will go wherever the flux is and it will also follow the heat on this first joint I was applying heat to the same face I was adding the solder to but I really should have been heating up the other side of the joint so that the solder would have been pulled around the joint after applying the solder I wiped away any excess with a wet paper towel and the joint was pretty much done and you can also see that I got a lot better as I went and my last few drawings for the cleanest as is pretty much always the case with this kind of thing so while I'm soldering let's talk about the sponsor of this week's video burns Matic burns ematic has been the leader in the blowtorch category since 1876 providing durable safe and dependable products that burns Ematic TS 8000 i used on this project is perfect for use on soldering and brazing jobs and is great for bigger larger jobs and projects that require a bit more heat like this one and I've owned this particular torch for at least a few years now and have used it for everything from lighting my scrap wood burn been to popping bubbles in epoxy and even searing steaks after cooking them in my sous vide so to learn more about the TS 8000 and burns emetics other products check out the link in the video description below and thanks again to Burns ematic for sponsoring this week's video after finishing soldering the dimensions on the support structure were set so I can get back to working on the wooden portion of the chair so I started by ripping the arms and legs to final width over the table saw and after ripping the boards to width I cut the boards to length using my crosscut table and I've got to say this is one of the best things I've added my workflow in a while and I just love the accuracy I get from it and if you can't add a crosscut table to your table saw a crosscut sled with a stop block built in would be another great option so what the boards cut the size I could get to work on the joinery for the chair and I went with pocket holes but if I had to make this project again I would not go with pocket holes for these pieces so one negative of thermally modified wood is that it tends to be brittle so even when using the correct hardwood pocket screws I still got a lot of splitting at the ends of the boards and I think something like dowel joinery or dominoes would have worked a lot better on these joints so to fix the splitting I added some thin CA glue to the cracks clamped them together and then added some activator to help prevent further cracking I would clamp the joints together drive the screws in slightly to mark the hole and then take the joint apart and pre-drill the holes and this was pretty tedious but luckily I only had to do this at this joint where the arm connected to the front leg when driving in the screws I would also back them out drive them in slightly and repeat this process just to help ease the screws in and the pre drilling and this easing end of the screws really helped a ton the two arms are connected to the back with this piece that wraps around the back of the chair and I again attach these with pocket holes but would again use another type of joinery and this joint actually ended up completely breaking off-camera and I had to fix it once again with CA glue and here you can see how that copper base will fit with the finished piece providing support to the arms and back stretcher which they had clearly needed the next piece is to work on or the back legs which had a parallel angle of 20 degrees cut on each end and I made these cuts over the miter saw also I should mention that I do have plans available for this project in case you're interested in building one of these for yourself the plans include a cut list and detailed step-by-step instructions of the build process along with the Sketchup model of the chair and I'll have a link in the cards in in the video description below in case you're interested next I marked the location of the back leg on the front and back sides of the front leg and also marked out locations for screw holes and I used normal two and a half inch screws here rather than pocket holes and I think it mitigated a lot of the splitting I had before adding the screws I pre-drilled and countersunk the holes making sure to countersink the holes is deep enough to allow me to plug the holes later after pre drilling the holes through the front leg I clamped the back leg in place using my t track table pre-drilled the holes into the back leg as well and then the screws and as you can see I started with inch and a quarter screws here but ended up switching to two and a half inch screws which provided a lot more strength you also might notice that I'm adding the back leg to the wrong edge of the front leg and that's because I figured it'd be easier to attach them in this orientation and then just swap the front legs rather than trying to figure out a method of clamping them along the inside edge of the front legs after swapping the legs I could mark out where I needed to cut a flat spot on the back legs to get the chair sitting level so to make this mark I propped the front legs up on an offcut bringing the front up 3/4 of an inch and making the front legs plumb and then I marked a line on the back legs using another offcut I can then just cut to my line using the jigsaw and I cleaned up the cut with my low angle block plane and with that the main structure of the chair was pretty much assembled so I could go ahead and attach the copper base and I originally used these straps here but ended up driving screws directly through the copper later which ended up looking a lot better next I could get to work on the back panel and this is a simple assembly of four boards connected with two perpendicular cross supports at the top and bottom of the panel's I ripped the boards to width and cut the boards to length and the table saw and then I could start assembling the back I first clamped the boards together so that they were square to each other and then laid out the location of the cross support and I needed to have an eighth inch overhang on the bottom cross support to allow room for wood movement and I set this spacing with an eighth inch spacer and then glued and nailed a piece in place and I repeated the same process for the other cross support piece and then I could start attaching the rest of the board's I used the same eighth inch spacers between each board adding glue to the cross support and then attaching the board's with two screws and I made sure to mark the locations of the screws so that they looked nice and just worked my way across the back panel next I needed to give the back panel attached to the back legs after marking the location of the back panel on the back legs I lifted the panel into place and then just clamped it in place to attach the back panel I once again used two and a half inch screws and pre-drilled and countersunk the holes before adding the screws with the back panel installed I could work on attaching the last parts of the chair which was the seat I started by adding the front most seat slat which helps the seat transition smoothly around that acute angle which just makes the seat more comfortable on the backs of your legs once again I cut the board the size of the table saw added pocket holes and then clamp the board in place after checking for square after clamping the board in place I drove in the pocket screws and then I could start working on the rest of the seat slides I measured the distance between the back panel and the front seat slat subtracted 5/8 of an inch to account for the gaps between the seat slats and then divided that number by four and I cut three of the seat slats to final width and left the front most piece to be cut to size later I also installed these pieces with pocket holes and it's a little bit tricky since I had to have the chair propped up on edge and I added that same eighth inch spacer between the slats when installing them and after getting the third slat installed I could measure for the final piece once again I subtracted a quarter of an inch to account for the gap on each side of the board and I also took my angle gauge and set the angle I need to cut on one side of the slat I set my table saw blade to that angle using the angle gauge as reference and then set the fence to the correct width airing on the side of too wide to start and this is what the board looks like after ripping with the angle on one edge and the other edge being square so in the first test fit the board fell through and chipped out the entire corner once again do the brittleness of this thermally modify – so again be careful there anyway after clamping the board in place and seeing it was slightly too wide I shaved off a bit more at the table saw and then fit the board into place with a spacer on each side clamped it and then added the pocket screws and with that all the parts of the chair were assembled so I could get the copper base removed for finishing before doing that I went ahead and added the inch and a half screws through the copper tubing using a center punch to mark the hole location and a metal drill bit to drill the holes and while I do that I just wanted to take a quick second to thank my YouTube sponsors for their continued support also YouTube has finally enabled us to add different levels luckily now the lowest option is a dollar ninety-nine and if you want to really help to support me there are even higher levels with even better perks like monthly Google Hangouts with me so check them out and let me know if there are any other perks you want to see in the comments below and thanks again to all of my members after getting all the screws added I removed the base and got it prepped for finish and I used a file to remove any excess solder around the joints which is a surprisingly quick process after filing I wiped the entire base down with synthetic steel wool to remove any surface imperfections and to allow the paint to adhere a little better and before painting and I wiped the base down with acetone to remove any metal dust and surface contaminants I used a self etching primer as the initial coat to provide better adhesion for the paint and then sprayed on a few coats of flat black paint while the paint dried I could finish up the wooden portion of the chair and now that the base was out of the way I can add pocket holes to attach the back panel to the back stretcher and I waited to do this until now so that I didn't have to guess in the location of pocket holes as I wanted them to be roughly centered on each back slat to allow for wood movement after attaching the back panel the structure of the chair was done so now if you get everything cleaned up first I wanted to plug all the screw holes and I tried a technique I had never actually tried before using a plug cutter the nice thing about a plug cutter is you can cut plugs from the exact wood you used on the project so the plugs basically disappear once added and this plug cutters from Rockler and it worked great and I'll have a link to it in the video description below after cutting the plugs I popped them out with a flathead screwdriver and added the plugs to the holes with a little bit of wood glue after driving in the plugs I trim them flush with my Japanese pull saw which I like to do while the glue is still wet and this allows the sawdust to work its way into any gaps around the plugs and after a little bit of sanding you're left with a basically seamless cover up and it's really pretty amazing how well this worked versus just using something like a dowel which is what I've used in the past and the best part is that these plugs are free once you have the plug cutter so the only holes I couldn't plug with the plug cutter where the pocket holes and Craig makes a pocket hole plug cutter which would have been perfect here but I don't have one so I tried to use some walnut dowels to plug the holes instead and the color match just wasn't great luckily these are barely visible in the final piece but I kind of wish I had just left the pocket holes visible so with that all that was left to do was get the chair sanded and I started by sanding a chamfer onto the bottom of the legs which will just help to keep the wood from splitting out when it's dragged across the after that I sanded the rest of the chair up to 180 grit making sure to break all of the edges I also hand sanded between all of the slats which was super tedious and with that all that was left to do was reattach the metal base and you might be asking what about the finish on the wood well since this thermally modified ash is so rot resistant I kind of want to use this chair as an experiment and it should just take on a beautiful gray patina over time kind of similar to cedar green little loud and since I'm terrible at maintaining outdoor finishes anyway I think this should work out fine so with the base attached I could call this chair finished alright hopefully you guys enjoyed this one I really like the way this chair came together again if you do want to build one of these for yourself I will have plans available I'll link to those in the video description below also in the video description below I'll have links to all the tools and materials I used on this project and last I have added some new a YouTube membership a-levels to the channel that gives you a lower cost option for supporting me monthly as well as some higher options which includes some really cool perks so hopefully you guys will check those out and until next week happy building

How to build a modern Adirondack chair // Outdoor Woodworking Plans

50 thoughts on “How to build a modern Adirondack chair // Outdoor Woodworking Plans

  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    I would have just used pine and either stained it or burned the outside and put a gloss over it. I have been making outside furniture for years with pine and have had no issues as long as its stained and has a protective barrier on it.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Whats that tool called on 12:13?

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Good old bbq smelling Viking ash! Love working with that stuff

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    I like the metal frame idea.

    Nice fsm shirt btw

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    I don't think I would have put end caps on the copper pipes. It will condensate inside and once you get enough of it, it will freeze in the winter and split the pipe. Drill you a little weep hole so it can drain out.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Chair looks amazing, but it was a pain to build for you, so I imagine is going to be impossible for me. Can you send me all the pieces cut and I'll assemble them? Kinda like an IKEA experience. I'll even pay for the shipping

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Very good video. Just wondering if using those copper pipes as legs to build a Bench will be enough to hold 1-2 persons.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    GORGEOUS chair man! 👏 And now I'm off to find thermally treated wood…

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    I'm definitely going to check out thermally modified ash. I thought it was walnut at first!

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Should tig the aluminum

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Hey Jonny !!!
    This Chair is so nice…. i Show it a Friend here in Germany. And now i Must build it for him 😜🤟🏻

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    I think the copper is useless for strength here….

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Having a heat sync on the side you’ve already brazed should help with brazing the second side.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    You deserve more subscribers then you have.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Is the reason for using copper structural ??  If it is, they sell thicker copper pipe for refrigeration, which is pretty strong.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    The design is really modern and beautiful!❤️ But what if I want to make it without metal, using only wood… Is that possible? How would you strengthen the seat? Thank you 😊

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Be sponsored by benzomatic, doesn’t mean that they will transfer the knowledge, as usual you do not know what you are doing….

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    a tip to avoid splitting for pocket holes would be to either wiping some wax or some soap on the screw or to even take the point off the screw. ive never had any problems after I found these solutions for me to prevent it

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Turned out great.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    I noticed that you were using your DeWalt "impact driver" to install the pocket screws. I'd been doing the same for several years (also with mixed results depending on the material) I'd be willing to bet you use the impact driver because your Kreg step drill bit stays in you regular drill driver through the process or is loaded with other drill bits 🙂 Well, I finally found a step drill bit that has a quick change hex shank and now I use the impact driver for drilling the holes and my regular DeWalt drill driver with a stop clutch setting of 6 to drive in the screws. I've never had a problem with over driving pocket screws ever since. P.S. I really like the design and the look of this chair. Its a winner in my opinion! Thanks for sharing 🙂

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Don’t you have an MP 210? TIG braze?

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    using copper pipe as a way to make the chair more rigid….is just whacky. What the hell. You have a shop outfitted with primo powermatic tools, why not do it right and use stronger joinery in the first place.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Next time you use pocket holes on hardwoods use some paste wax on the screws. I usually put a liberal amount on the threads and then drive it home. It gives the screw enough lube to go in without splits.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    That's a beautiful chair. Well done.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Nice job pulling it all together – 5/4 boards will be less split-prone when using the super-cooked wood and look more proportional for what you are building (so much so, maybe you wouldn't need the metal supports) – also, ash is more likely to split anyway (i.e. baseball bats). Where's the cup holders bro – drill 3.5" holes, ease the edges w/ a round-over bit and make bent copper U-strips screwed to the under side of the arms to support the bottom of the cups/cell phone – just say'n. Or, just put black plastic cup holder inserts recessed flush into the top surface of the arms. ;^P Keep up the good work!!

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Really cool. I have learned a lot from watching your videos. Can you build these chairs with simple tools? I am just starting my woodworking journey and do not have a lot of tools.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Looks like you had as much luck aluminum brazing as I did. I'll definitely be revisiting that process, when it's appropriate, but I switched to fasteners for my project.

    When you're cleaning the outside surface of the copper pipe, it's easier to use abrasive cloth than the brush. It comes in a roll.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Glad to know I’m not the only one who uses their torch for both making and cooking LOL

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Johnny, have you ever tried using wax when driving screws into hard wood? I usually keep a cheap candle around to use on screws for when I'm doing oak or other similar hard wood work. Sometimes, rarely, I'll do it on my mesquite as well (I usually dont like screws in my mesquite projects).

    Forgot to say that is a really designed chair. It's an awesome look.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Man! Definitely a cool build, but that Ash looks like a real pain to work with. Good opportunity to test and push your skills though. Nice work m’man!

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    HI copper soldering 101, clean the parts add flux, THEN heat from one side, when the flame turns GREEN on the other side add the filler materiale.. That's it 🙂

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Do people actually want to do google hangouts? Seems strange to me. Nice chair!

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Clearly not the best material for furniture making. Superb for decking though..

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    How did you decide on the inclination and size of this chair?
    I guess sitting height, backside height and with have certain standard measurements? But what about the inclination?

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Try using a heat gun for sticker removal. It works really well

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    John Malecki made the same clamp mistake. Next time, use the Fireball square, but with spacers between it and the workpieces.
    I think the copper would look cool with a few coats of clear lacquer or clear enamel.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    I really like the frame underneath that supports/arranges the wood. That's a great idea to help hold minimalist designs together. I'll have to keep that in mind for future designs that need a little more backbone. Great video, as always!

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Instead of prying the plugs out you could run it through the bandsaw and they all fall out.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Man!!! encountering a problem on every woodworking project made me like to give up, but you nailed it! I had documented all my mistakes into a video build film, I hope I can achieve same level of expertise like yours someday hehe

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    I have never used this product before, you kept mentioning how brittle it was. My outdoor furniture gets a lot of use, I would be afraid this would not last too many years.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    I’m curious as to why you went with pocket holes for the seat slats instead of cleats underneath.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    why not just turn a dowel yourself out of the ash?

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    What is the song at 16:04?

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    I like the chair… does that copper pipe actually provide any support tho?

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    nice Finnegan Garage Shirt!

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Very nice build sir, I've never seen that type of wood before, is it expensive?

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  • July 30, 2019 at 2:03 pm
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    Yeah that intro is cringy. But I'm glad you admit it.

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