Brian: “It’s a high pressure stakes game
here…[laughing]” You’re probably wondering how I ended up
in this situation… …and why I’m walking around blindfolded
making weird noises. Hey smart people, Joe here. So recently, I
got to try something that made me feel like I basically had superpowers. And you can do it too, at home. But before we get there – you need to meet
my new friend, Molly Burke. Joe: So, I met you a couple of months ago
and immediately became fascinated with this guy. Molly: He’s my guide dog, Gallop! So when I was four-years – old, I was diagnosed
with a rare genetic disease called retinitis pigmentosa, slowly over time, I went blind. I lost the majority of my vision when I was
14, which was in 2008. Despite the fact that I still look 14 I am
now 25, and I’m a blind YouTuber now. Joe: You navigate the world in a really special
way that totally blew my mind when we met. Tell us about it. Molly: When I was seven-years-old, I started
taking O&M, or orientation and mobility training. That included passive echolocation. I learned how to pay attention to the sounds
that exist already. We live in a really loud world, I mean, listen
to this. We don’t usually notice every sound because
most of our brains are constantly tuning out what’s not important  – there’s so much
noise out there, we have to be able to filter that information so it doesn’t sound like
a jumbled mess. But imagine being able to pick out any one
sound, and use only that sound to navigate any environment, even one you’ve never been
in before. As a sighted person, this seems impossible,
and honestly like a good way to hurt yourself. But with the help of a teacher in her O&M
program, Molly learned how to do it. Molly: So the way she would train me, is she
would blindfold me, she would put me on the sidewalk (with my cane, of course) and I would
walk down the sidewalk and she would have me count trees. Molly: So the best way I can kind of explain
it it is there’s sound, and then there’s a lack of sound. But really, a lack of sound still makes noise. Joe: Wow. Molly: We call them sound shadows. Sound shadows. Whoa. Am I right? It’s like there’s a whole world that sighted
people aren’t aware of. And that got me wondering, can anyone learn
echolocation? Well, we’re about to put my dumb ears to
the test. Echolocation is used by tons of different
animals, from whales to bats, to birds – even cute widdle shrews can do it. The species that are the best at it use active
echolocation – the same way that sonar works on ship. Instead of just listening, they first send
out a sound, like a click. Those sound waves sweep through the environment,
and if they hit something, they bounce back. By reading these echoes, the brain can actually
form a mental map. Like Marvel’s Daredevil. I prefer the real daredevil. I said the real daredevil. Perfection. The time between when the sound is made, and
when it bounces back helps the brain calculate things like distance, and the “quality”
of the sound bouncing back can even carry information like an object’s texture or
hardness. So I’ve always wanted to learn active echolocation, but I’ve only been trained in passive echolocation. Funny you should mention that Molly! Because we have a surprise for her. Joe: Molly? Molly: Yes? Joe: I told you I had a surprise for you… Molly: YES!? Joe: I have  a guest here with us. I have Brian Bushway walking in with me Molly: Hello! Brian: Hello Molly! Brian works with a nonprofit called visioneers. And he’s a master echolator. Brian uses active echolocation like all those
other animals we mentioned. He teaches it too. And he assured me, that – with some practice
– anyone who can hear, can do this. Brian: Active echolocation is just passive
echolocation – what you’ve already been using – at a more enhanced level. So whether we send the brain patterns of light,
which is vision, or patterns of sound, the brain will still construct an image. Speaking of the brain – there’s an old idea,
one that a lot of people still believe, that when you get to some age your brain freezes
and it’s always going to be wired like that … forever. But what we’re learning is that the brain
is a lot more flexible and adaptable than we thought……we call this ability to adapt
and rewire “neuroplasticity.” What does it mean for a brain to be plastic
– it’s almost like rearranging, not physically, but parts of the brain can be reassigned to
handle new things or tasks. Scientists have found that blind people are
almost always a little better at echolocating than sighted people. Their brains had to develop new ways to handle
sensory information. That’s exactly what happened to Molly. Brian: If you’re already able to walk down
the sidewalk and passively detect trees, that means your hearing is super astute. That’s great…. so now when we teach you
this active signal, that’s going to bring more clarity to your image. Brian: So the visual analogy is this, we have
active echolocation, which we teach with a click …”click,” “click” Molly: Wow that doesn’t sound like a tongue
click! Joe: That’s such a good tongue click! Brian: What gives you control over your environment
with the active click – it allows you to, almost like a screen refresher, so if you’re
running down the street, or riding your bike down the street, you can click, and you can
actually hear the back of parked cars or curbs. So, in a quiet, residential neighborhood we
can ride a bike and we actively click. Joe: You’re riding a bike, as a blind person,
which I could bet you – Molly: Not a tandem bike? Brian: Not a tandem bike Molly: I had to stop riding bikes when I was
eight, because I rode into a pole. And ever since then I’ve had to use a tandem
bike. And that was frustrating for me, and that’s
always one of the things, when people ask me what I miss about being sighted, I always
say the things that I miss the most are the things give you freedom. And I have seen blind people using active
echolocation where they’re skateboarding on their own, or playing basketball on their
own, or riding a bike on their own. And that’s what I would love to do. Joe: Well, speaking of learning echolocation,
I’m hoping Brian can take us through a few things, so we can show people what this education
looks like, what these tecniques looks like, and hopefully through my dumb sighted head,
show that anyone can do this. Brian: So when we talk about clicking, there’s
actually two sounds. There’s the click that’s made in our mouth,
and there’s the echo that’s reflected off of everything in this room. Brian: You want a good click to be clear,
clean, and sharp, and then you ignore it, because you’re really paying attention to
– Molly: what the feedback is? Brian: Exactly! Side note. Getting a good tongue click is hard. Clicking is what people like Brian use, but
really, you can navigate your environment with almost any sound you make. For the first demonstration, I’m going to
use a shhhh sound. I’m going to put my hands up in a flat area, and make that shhhh sound, and you’ll hear the
sound change as it comes in front of me. Brian: SHhhhh demo Should we try it? Brian: Sure, try it! Brian: So what we’ve just understood here
in a matter of seconds, is that you just understood when something was in front of you, vs. when
something was not. AND you could even hear when another person
did this. Once we had some practice with shhhh-ing,
we learned how to tell different echoes apart. Brian: Just, you know – by a hunch, what’s
your hypothesis, which do you think will be easier to hear, the hollow bowl or the flat
panel? Joe: The hollow bowl, I think, is going to
have a pretty distinct sound. Hollow sounds, like what comes out of the
bowl are easy to pick out,  because the edges work like a funnel, sending the sound back
towards you. Listen to the difference. Brian: These are the things we want to note
because this hollow bowl is will represent entry ways, doorways. Most  doors are placed in alcoves, and alcoves
create a hollow sound, very similar to a bowl. And when you understand how to listen and
recognize that, you know where to aim a guide dog or a cane. Brian: When I say go, I want you to click
and recognize where you hear your hollow space, on the right or on the left. Go. Joe: Ok left? Brian: Correct! Now keep clicking, and aim and try to reach
you hand and touch it. Joe: Oh no! Brian: Boom, that’s amazing for the first
time though. That’s directive reaching, that’s important,
it’s part of how we teach ourselves. Joe: Molly? Brian: Molly’s turn! Molly: Oh goodness. Joe: Ok I’m going to take my blindfold off
so I can experience this Molly: So, I’m intrigued to try the clicking,
because my instinct is so much to not click because I’m so used to listening to the
natural. Watching what Molly could do, even without
clicking was… woah. She told me things about the room that I would
never imagine someone who couldn’t see would know about, just by the sound it makes. I feel like there stuff behind us, like it’s very heavy back there whereas it’s like very open in front and to the left, it’s far more open at least than behind us and to the right Use that to your advantage. Joe did not have that kind of sophistication
or understanding already. Your brain is already adapted. Molly: It’s to my right, but a little in
front of me. Brian: Ok, so I want you to click, and image
where it is, and reach out and touch it. Molly: Yesss!!!! I did it exactly! Brian: graduating to the next level! Molly: yayyy!!!! Brian: Here we go! So already in a matter of minutes and just
a couple exercises, you’re already noticing powerful information. When something is there, and when it isn’t. Molly: And I do notice, the time I didn’t
click and grab, I grabbed your hand. But the time I did click, I punched the middle. Brian: You were more precise. Molly: So, you’re right! It was, it was more precise. I’m already starting to see the difference
between just passively echolocation, and actively trying to do it. Brian describes seeing with soundwaves as
a kind of fuzzy geometry – and one place you can really see that fuzzy geometry, is in
a corner. Brian: Corners have such a unique quality,
because the sound triangulates inside a corner. Brian: Molly go ahead and try the shh thing
first, because anytime you have someone sighted people, to explain this, the shh will help
everyone. Molly: shhhhhh. Oh my god, it’s so weird, it’s like I
have a full image of like the half tunnel around me. Brian: Oh yeah! It’s amazing! It totally takes the shape, it’s such a
cool phenomenon. Brian: And the other thing we’re going to
talk about is edge detection. And what we’re going to do is look at what
does it sound like to actually face a wall, vs. the open space of the open door. And we’re really listening to the threshold
of the wall, and the open space. You’ll hear the external edge of the door
frame. Joe: Shhhhhhhhh. It’s right there, right in front of my nose. Joe: It’s almost like the sound goes mute,
in a way. Studies have shown that, especially for novice
echolocators (like me), moving the head around helps us understand the shape of the space
around them. One of the things I realized as we were practicing
is how tiring this was, my brain felt exhausted as if I’d been studying for three hours. It’s a workout for your brain. Brian: one of the great things we accomplished
is activating everyone’s perceptual system, getting the brain just curious about more
information. It’s easy to imagine echolocation as just
listening, but it’s more than that. The human brain wants sensory information,
and it’s constantly trying to construct a map of our environment, whether or not we’re
aware of it. The difference is which type of input people
give their brains. When scientists put blind echolocators into
MRI machines, and played recorded echoes back to them, the regions of the brain associated
with vision were activated – even though they weren’t getting any visual input. The parts of the brain that handle motion
and movement were turned on during active echolocation, even if the person wasn’t
moving at all. The weird part is that we don’t really understand
exactly how brains rewire like this, but it’s another sign of how adaptable the brain is. Molly: I’m curious how this would benefit
me in very crowded environments. When it’s very very crowded, guide dogs
can’t do their thing, canes can’t really do their thing, because it’s like hitting
a thing, hitting a thing. In really, really crowded environments most
blind people end up going sighted-guide. Every blind person needs to know about this,
every blind person needs to be able to have access to this. People like Brian and the rest of the visioneers
team are giving not just blind people, but all of us, a new way to experience the world. Studies are showing us that our abilities
go beyond what we’d expect. This experience changed the way I think about
my own brain, and about my own ideas of what it’s like to be blind. Joe:  I’ve gone through my life thinking…. my perception of blindness, is that something
is missing. And this has shown me that I have been missing,
and tuning out this other sensory experience that is incredibly rich, and that can show
me different things about my environment that I was just ignoring and that’s the biggest thing I’ll take away from this, it’s not something leaving, it’s gaining something new Brian: I’ve also been asked that question,
you know, “Brian, if you could see again, what would that be like? Would you want to?” But the experiences that I’ve learned from
the quote unquote “vision loss” has actually taught me so much more about life and our
human capacity. I’ve had the great fortune of actually conquering
one of man’s greatest fears: the fear of darkness. The fact that we could all image acoustically
really challenges that whole notion. And so, many times sighted people say oh if
you can’t see the flashing lights that hypnotize, it’s a loss. And I say you, SIGHTED people, have not developed
your brain to actually understand the world and beauty of acoustic images. Molly: So they’re also missing out on something. That kind of levels the playing field, in
a way. Joe: Brian, thank you so much for letting
us experience this, my brain is tired in the best way possible. Molly, thank you so much for experiencing
this with us. Molly: This was amazing! Joe: Guys, stay curious, and I’m going to
keep pacticing. If you want to learn more… head on over
to Molly’s channel, I helped her dig into the science of her particular kind of blindness,
which was super interesting and I learned so much talking to her. Joe: and we’ve already figured out that
I’m going to be the first to die in the zombie apocalypse. Molly: Yep.

How Blind People See With Sound… feat. Molly Burke!
Tagged on:                                                                                                         

100 thoughts on “How Blind People See With Sound… feat. Molly Burke!

  • August 10, 2019 at 7:12 pm
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    This was a really amazing experience. I learned so much, not only about how blind people experience the world but about how I and all of us view so-called "disability". Thank you so much to Molly for doing this with me. Definitely go check out her channel!

    Reply
  • August 21, 2019 at 11:26 am
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    I don't like the new logo :((

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  • August 21, 2019 at 11:50 am
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    This kind of reminds me of the Ted talk where they wore a special, 3-axis, attenuated, vibrating shirt that, directionally, detected the EMF spectrum directly near them. They, in a sense, added another meta-sense to their repertoire. Fascinating what the human mind is capable of, not only learning, but adapting to as well!

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  • August 21, 2019 at 1:19 pm
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    4:53
    Heh… your brain is plastic

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  • August 21, 2019 at 2:32 pm
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    Who else gets the feeling that someone is standing right next to you when you walk by a mannequin at the store just by the way it blocks sound?

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  • August 21, 2019 at 2:55 pm
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    molly is the superhero youtube needs

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  • August 21, 2019 at 3:30 pm
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    I though echolocation is only for animals I just though

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  • August 21, 2019 at 3:36 pm
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    I used to go "blind walking" with my friends you close youre eyes and listen and follow the person in fronts foot steps its suuuper relaxing. Im going to try this now

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  • August 21, 2019 at 3:43 pm
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    I still can't believe that girl is blind. I mean she looks at people's face when talking and she is so stylish

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  • August 21, 2019 at 3:43 pm
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    I heard about a study of human echolocation years ago and I was always fascinated by the subject. Years later, my friend group and I developed this game where we would try to tag the other members by throwing something. We naturally developed our spacial awareness based on both sound and visual cues. I have always been invested in improving my senses, so we would also do perception checks where we see how much information we have gained without consciously thinking about it. We are able to hear the people walking behind us or the trees in the wind, but I always had the best hearing. On some occasions, I would be able to hear the hallways narrow or broaden or a cabinet left open.

    One day, I was leaving my cousins house, making my way to the front door. I kept the lights off as to not wake her family that fell asleep on the couch. As I was walking, I made a sudden stop because I "heard" something in front of me. In the near pitch black, I reached out and felt a bench that was moved and blocked the door. I was a little too stunned that I registered the bench to warn my cousin before hearing a thud. Another time, I was playing hide-and-go-seek in the dark and I was trying to find a place to hide. I ran around the pitch-black apartment and I was amazed by the clarity of the sound. I heard the soft clothes in the closet contrasted by the solid wood of the door. One time, I was it and I found someone by hearing the change in "texture" from pillows to skin.

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  • August 21, 2019 at 4:20 pm
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    1:51 wilhelm scream

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  • August 21, 2019 at 4:24 pm
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    Acceptable use of Wilhelm scream.

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  • August 21, 2019 at 5:39 pm
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    Go Molly! So happy for you to learn things to make your life easier and better:)

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  • August 21, 2019 at 5:55 pm
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    Molly can definitely see a little bit. I mean look how she looks into the eyes of other people. This or she might be on whole new level of echolocation

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  • August 21, 2019 at 7:25 pm
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    This was amazing!

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  • August 21, 2019 at 8:17 pm
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    Dit is zo cool!

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  • August 21, 2019 at 8:24 pm
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    This is cool!! I’ll try to practice this when i’m running up the stairs at night away from the monsters….

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  • August 21, 2019 at 8:56 pm
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    There's a Wilhelm scream at 1:52!

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  • August 21, 2019 at 9:11 pm
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    Wait so Toph doesn’t even need earthbending just a good tongue click..

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  • August 21, 2019 at 9:15 pm
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    When o first saw this I was like hey how come Molly doesn’t need to wear the blind fold… oh wait

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  • August 21, 2019 at 9:20 pm
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    Please tell me you knew about sound shadows before even considering this video? Or am I the only person on the planet who tried to duplicate super powers from the comics?

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  • August 21, 2019 at 10:03 pm
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    Dude. Don’t pet the guide dog in harness. He’s working.

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  • August 21, 2019 at 10:47 pm
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    Get rekt she’ll never see these comments

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  • August 21, 2019 at 10:58 pm
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    I used to use ambient noise to help orient myself when I was a kid. I'm not sure why, I had perfect sight, but I liked to stare at the ground while I walked, and I used sound to "see" around me even if I wasn't directly looking. I never used sound to count tress though, that's pretty cool.

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  • August 21, 2019 at 11:47 pm
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    I just subscribed, I came from Molly’s video!❤️

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  • August 22, 2019 at 2:17 am
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    I found it fascinating that molly closed her eyes during the bowl test

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  • August 22, 2019 at 2:44 am
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    I heard you Willem 1:52

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  • August 22, 2019 at 3:07 am
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    6:26 … “and I have seen”

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  • August 22, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    Fascinating. Thank you!

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  • August 22, 2019 at 3:58 am
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    You're not supposed to touch gallop when hes working!

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  • August 22, 2019 at 5:16 am
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    I 100% excepted this to be a joke tbh. That's amazing!

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  • August 22, 2019 at 5:21 am
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    love this! i love seeing a blind-majority activity where the sighted person is the one who's the fish out of water 🙂

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  • August 22, 2019 at 5:32 am
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    Book of eli

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  • August 22, 2019 at 5:55 am
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    Molly looks so excited 🙂

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  • August 22, 2019 at 6:24 am
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    Per chance baked beans could power your echolocation via heavy-duty flatulence. Bon apetít. Cheers!

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  • August 22, 2019 at 6:28 am
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    Teach less, no jay glenisso! Thanks

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  • August 22, 2019 at 11:03 am
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    "there's so much noise out there, we have to be able to filter out!" My ears must be working overtime they straight filter everything out. Deaf joke…I am deaf, not funny 🙂 PS thanks for having good closed captions!

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  • August 22, 2019 at 11:57 am
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    It's a little morbid that I got an ad for glasses before this video.

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  • August 22, 2019 at 12:29 pm
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    These videos light my day. Great substance

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  • August 22, 2019 at 1:58 pm
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    Nice wilhelm

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  • August 22, 2019 at 4:03 pm
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    Someone should do “being blind for a week” ..and not like a joke but actually trying to adapt to the lifestyle

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  • August 22, 2019 at 4:18 pm
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    Already knew this and sometimes use it when it’s dark

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  • August 22, 2019 at 4:21 pm
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    This was such a cool video! I didn't even know humans could echolocate, actively OR passively! And it was so refreshing to see a scenario where blindness gave an advantage rather than a disadvantage. It reminded me of this idea that disability doesn't exist when accessibility is improved. Super educational and fun video, loved it!

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  • August 22, 2019 at 5:31 pm
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    Wow, that's amazing!

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  • August 22, 2019 at 6:32 pm
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    Can sighted people master echo location?

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  • August 22, 2019 at 7:03 pm
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    My hearing got so much better when I was blind, I had it back in 6 months but it's still causing me problems due to excess stimuli sensory wise. I used tapping on items to find where the sink and door is in the bathroom. I use my cane on sidewalks and steps to help me with depth perception.

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  • August 22, 2019 at 7:06 pm
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    I would love to learn to echolocate specifically so i can see in the dark

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  • August 22, 2019 at 7:14 pm
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    Lmao love how they laugh at her for riding into a pole. Poor molly😅

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  • August 22, 2019 at 10:16 pm
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    I watched this video and then went and watched several of Molly’s videos. In several of her video’s she states very clearly that she has “light sensitivity” and can detect light and dark, like seeing like and shadow. In this video she said she could detect the trees in echolocation by walking by the or under them and experiencing the “sound shadow”. I am not saying she is not blind and I am not saying echolocation isn’t real. I am saying that there is misdirection and dishonesty from Molly. Plus with a lot of the skeptics she has, I probably would not have made her the star of a video. Sorry, for this reason I am unsubscribing. I wish the best to both of you.

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  • August 22, 2019 at 10:38 pm
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    well.. uh… I can twist my spaghetti WITHOUT a spoon… so.. BOOM!

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  • August 22, 2019 at 11:53 pm
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    I call them sound shadows and I have perfect vision.

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  • August 23, 2019 at 1:19 am
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    I have adhd, I don't filter anything … but I can't focus either wooops

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  • August 23, 2019 at 2:58 am
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    F*ing idiots like you perpetuate the bullshit that blind people are somehow superhuman. Do you have one iota of how difficult this world is for someone who can't see, I don't but I can certainly surmise.. and the VAST MAJORITY of blind people.. are just that.. people who can't see, who have no visual capabilities, and they don't have super hearing and they don't echolocate. You think they are bats or something.. Let me ask you, when was the last time you actually SAW with your own two eyes, a blind person making clicking noises?

    IF, they can navigate this world then it is by, painful practice, luck, memory and necessity… You morons put on a blindfold and think you know something.. the very HUBRIS that you can have this point of view proves categorically that you have no clue what you are talking about. You ignorant garbage.

    "It's okay to be smart" as a laughable name for you to take if this kind of material is what you classify as 'smart.'

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  • August 23, 2019 at 3:14 am
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    I've studied sound theoretically and understood the concepts, but this video really helped me bring some of the concepts to everyday life 👍🏻

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  • August 23, 2019 at 3:15 am
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    I'm not blind. However when traversing my house in the middle of the night I do use the passive echo locations because I can't see. And when I loose hearing sometimes for whatever reason say a clogged ear I feel heavily impaired almost to the point of feeling as if I am blind.

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  • August 23, 2019 at 3:46 am
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    If i’m drowsy or trying to sleep in class and my teacher is facing towards the board while talking, I know when to open my eyes because the sound of him talking into the board is different from him talking facing towards the classroom 🙂 ofc this only works when i’m half awake

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  • August 23, 2019 at 3:48 am
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    I can kinda ecolocate. I'm still working on it.

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  • August 23, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    I would be terrified of going blind, especially since I love drawing

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  • August 23, 2019 at 5:33 am
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    So noone is gonna talk about how beautiful she is?

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  • August 23, 2019 at 5:48 am
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    I see everything that you see, except I don’t see like you do. I release a sonic wave from my mouth

    AAAAAAHHHHHHHHHH! There, I got a pretty good look at you

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  • August 23, 2019 at 6:42 am
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    Bro but HOLD TF UP, shes beautiful dawg 😭❤️

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  • August 23, 2019 at 8:45 am
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    Sound Shadows

    Mind blown

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  • August 23, 2019 at 11:42 am
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    Trust me, ssshhh is the one.

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  • August 23, 2019 at 2:57 pm
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    I’m blinded by her beauty and personality. She’s phenomenal.

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  • August 23, 2019 at 3:21 pm
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    WOW! WOW! WOW! WOW! WOW!😮😮😮😮
    I Love this, Totally love this😘😘😘😘😘🙏🙏🙏🙏🇮🇳

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  • August 23, 2019 at 6:22 pm
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    These two lovely blind people are so positive! Its pretty cool to "see" that.
    But i would still much rather have vision than being blind.

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  • August 23, 2019 at 7:03 pm
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    She's obviously not blind. Blind people don't use their eyes.

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  • August 24, 2019 at 12:25 am
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    Why is she closing her eyes at 9:30 and then opening them when the exercise is over? Hmmmm

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  • August 24, 2019 at 3:21 am
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    is he actually blind? wth. he's awesome

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  • August 24, 2019 at 6:15 am
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    10:42 why is she closing her eyes is if she’s blind??

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  • August 24, 2019 at 7:34 am
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    This video hurt my ears at some parts lol

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  • August 24, 2019 at 7:51 am
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    if you listen carefully at 7:40 you can hear his heartbeat from his chest mic

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  • August 24, 2019 at 10:18 am
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    The guy is like the not-so-nerdy hank green

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  • August 24, 2019 at 11:48 am
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    5:13 tfw you aren't sure if you need to make eye contact with the blind person

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  • August 24, 2019 at 12:34 pm
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    This is such an interesting technique; the brain is truly amazing! I am deaf in one ear which makes me unable to tell where sound is coming from; therefore, I would not be able to do most of this, but it's a pretty amazing skill for the blind.

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  • August 24, 2019 at 2:19 pm
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    I'm not blind, and I remember doing this in the family car when I was little, when we'd drive with the windows down in summer. I recall very clearly hearing a loud hiss that would periodically go completely away, then come back, then go away again, and wondering what was causing it. I kept listening and looking out the window to see what it was because it sounded like an echo — and that's what it was. I realized that it was the hiss of the tire noise. When we were next to a curb, the hiss bounced back to the car. When we went past a curb cut or an intersection, the hiss went away. So I could close my eyes and tell when we were passing an intersection or curb cut by listening to the tire noise. Sighted people I think hear this more than we realize, but our eyes are so overwhelming a sense that we just tune it out — but even we can tell things like how large a darkened room is when we walk into it.

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  • August 24, 2019 at 2:34 pm
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    Love this but please use person first language. Instead of saying blind person say person who is blind.
    Thank you!

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  • August 24, 2019 at 2:48 pm
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    How do they know a sidewalk curves in a park when they use echolocation?

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  • August 24, 2019 at 4:02 pm
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    Nap use at 0:09

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  • August 24, 2019 at 5:04 pm
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    Molly sent me

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  • August 24, 2019 at 7:21 pm
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    It's okay to be blind

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  • August 24, 2019 at 10:41 pm
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    That was awesome. Can't wait to see how molly uses this in the future 🙂

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  • August 25, 2019 at 2:56 am
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    Bryan sounds just like Danny from Emzotics channel!

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  • August 25, 2019 at 1:01 pm
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    If you had to choose between being blind or deaf, which would you choose?

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  • August 25, 2019 at 3:16 pm
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    Who thinks it is funny when molly was trying to find the bowl she closed her eyes. Your the best

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  • August 25, 2019 at 4:13 pm
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    5:30 WELL that's a GOD tier tongue click

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  • August 25, 2019 at 4:57 pm
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    Maybe if you have tinnitus and some hearing loss, you wouldn’t say that “anyone who can hear can do this”.

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  • August 25, 2019 at 7:59 pm
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    I would be interested about a video over authism. Since we don't have a filter for all the sound around us and everything we see. You can imagene, I hope, that hearing everything without a filter is very tiring by the and of the day. Even more when you have been outside in a place with lot's of people or a small room with lot's of people talking

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  • August 25, 2019 at 10:46 pm
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    6:25 "and I have SEEN people using active echolocation" hhhmmm

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  • August 26, 2019 at 3:20 am
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    I bet she can see some stuff, she looks directly at stuff when they're taking about it.

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  • August 26, 2019 at 9:03 am
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    Wow! what a great and inspiring video! I have to try this, amazing!

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  • August 26, 2019 at 10:16 am
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    Thumbs up to Molly and Brian <3

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  • August 26, 2019 at 12:25 pm
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    God! This is amaizing!!!

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  • August 26, 2019 at 5:28 pm
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    Tim & Eric. Respect.

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  • August 26, 2019 at 9:36 pm
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    I can tell you that it's probably impossible for me to echolocate anything. I only have one ear, I can't even hear what direction the sounds are coming from!
    Loved learning about it, though!

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  • August 26, 2019 at 9:59 pm
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    Increíble episodio ❤️

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  • August 26, 2019 at 10:39 pm
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    I focused my ears on the fan.. Took a while , found out it needs to be fixed. Lol

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  • August 27, 2019 at 2:20 am
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    132 people walked into walls after watching this video

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  • August 27, 2019 at 5:30 am
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    I just realized this was a bad video for me to watch. I am currently recovering from my 2nd concussion I had in a year's time (3rd total) which, among other has lead to really bad balance, and it makes me want to walk around with my eyes closed making clicking noises…. Actually I might have done it for a few minutes before I decided it was probably a bad idea.

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  • August 27, 2019 at 6:28 am
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    Someone needs to tell Molly that when you are blind it's weird to look people in the eyes

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