to be able to ski well on terrain like this it makes sense that you have to be able to make a bulletproof short turn on moderate terrain first in this video I'm going to demonstrate to you how to get this done here is your bulletproof short turn on moderate terrain without a brushed car parallel turn like this one blue slopes you are surely going to struggle on black diamond runs a basin Colorado doing some of our tipping exercises we're filming at different times of year all over the west and in Europe for the new essentials DVDs so this is May 24th believe it or not in Colorado getting in our pieces that we still need for the DVDs beautiful day it's a little bright out here's the turn that you want to accomplish work your way up through this video and watching the exercises and you'll be able to perform a turn this is your basic turn without any frills that builds the foundation for skiing everywhere I win any mountain but this takes practice two footed release is your ticket there there are a lot of essentials in this particular exercise and it's an exercise that needs to be built up you're not going to get it the first time out the door it's a very difficult exercise to execute properly but I'm going to break it down into small steps for you so learning to release comes first flatten your skis to the snow by tipping your skis and your feet off your edges set yourself up for success by flexing your legs put your skis on edge and then face your chest and your jacket zipper down the slope place your downhill pole directly below your feet your uphill arm up by your ski tips and the uphill pole tip directly up the hill use the zipper on your jacket to give yourself the direction for where your upper body should be pointing now begin by wiggling your feet or tipping your feet on and off your edges to get a feel for how much movement you need to begin your skis slipping flatten your skis flatten your edges until the ski starts looking downhill once you sense how to release your skis by flattening your feet let the skis move downhill let the tips move down toward the fall line and then complete the bottom of the arc with your foot tipping let's review flatten the skis until they start slipping stay balanced or your inside foot bag and finish the turn with more inside foot tipping just before the fall line the key to completing the turn is to tip your inside foot towards its little toe edge side to make sure you are in balance and staying forward pull that inside foot back under your hips to keep it even with the outside ski route until your skis point straight down the fall line will take numerous tries and lots of practice so don't hold back now it's time to begin linking or connecting to putted releases when you finish the first one release the skis again begin the next series the slow single two-footed releasing exercise is the lead up to connected two-footed releases then to slow brush carves tomorrow dressen brush carves to the actual bulletproof all-mountain short turn so as you can see you build this series of movements to get to that all Mountain bulletproof short turn the goal is to build your brush carve turns and your two-footed releases so that you can ski all Mountain terrain with confidence that you have a short term that will work this is Harold Hart saying have a great see

Harald Harb's Ski: Road to Carving, Expert Skiing: The Two footed release
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38 thoughts on “Harald Harb's Ski: Road to Carving, Expert Skiing: The Two footed release

  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Awesome series. And you can almost imagine Herb is Steve Carell giving you skiing tips.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Awesome instructional, Harald!
    I’m just starting, I tend to separate my knees a lot more than you are, I think for balance or slowing down help:( I think my skis might be a little too long, so I’m going to try some shorter ones. Any other ideas on how to keep the knees closer? I am really trying…

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    What length skis are you using?

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    This video is amazing! I had seen it many years ago and it seemed to me that it was not an essential video.

    This video was short and it was free and so for me it could not bring miracles.

    In fact, I realize that if you do exactly what Harald says, you're absolutely sure to dramatically improve your skiing. With this turn you can ski almost everywhere.

    This turn is reliable, versatile and very relaxing !! In addition, you can improve it easily from year to year to get what Harald calls the Bulletproof short turn !

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    A big thank you for the videos, it has changed my skiing. I have been at it for 50 years, never had a lesson. After applying your techniques, I am now able to have full control of my speed through all the turns. What you said is true, it works in the bumps, in the crud, in the steep chutes. I needed that since we came to ski Jackson Hole, and I have to say that is a steep mountain. I was okay, but this has taken me to the next level. Loving the technique in the bumps and the trees, it gives me so much more confidence. A big thank you!!!

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Amazing!! I respect you!! Best instruction it is good motivation for skiing exercise!

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Hi Harald, you talk a lot about a wide stance not being beneficial to skiing, can you confirm if you mean the vertical distance or the horizontal distance between the feet?
    Shortening of the inside leg to increase edge angle gives the impression of a wide stance but as you know the distance between legs dose not increase.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    I've just started doing it (tilting the inside foot on its little toe edge) and it really feels the skis are turning themselves! But it really take a little bit of time to manage the 'new' movements of the skis.
    Now allow me some questions that seem pretty legit:
    – HOW does it allow you to ski on any kind of terrain and to improve your skiing overall? WHY does it lead to a better aggressive skiing?
    – What is the role o this technique (also called 'two footed release'?!) in the whole PMTS skiing system?
    Thanks.

    P.S.: you're an awesome instructor!

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    I believe the two footed release is the same as the weighted release.  Correct?

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    BASI teaches peddling and extension. Spoilt the sensation of skiing for me and no longer a member. This seems very similar to how Warren Smith Academy teaches, much more fun falling with gravity than effectively pushing yourself downhill, glad to have found your work. 

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Looks good and so easy but it isn't 🙂

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Great Video Harald. As an old dog of 43 who came very late to this wonderful sport and has spent a total of 4 days on skis i've just ordered your ski essentials book and dvd. Hope it's not too complicated 😉

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    FWIW- Lateral body position (where your center of mass is located between your skis) is critical here to unlock the feet to permit the tipping and release of the edges. If this was explained here I missed it.  If you look at 3:26 you will see Harald move his hips slightly downhill to allow the feet to release the edges. Nothing wrong with this and probably and affectation of a static demonstration. I have found that when completing a turn I want to try to get my hips (my center) as close to that position as possible to that position at the end of a turn so that my upper body (and center) requires the least amount of adjustment/movement for the quickest, most responsive edge release and reengagement.  ( Position, of course will modified for momentum and centripetal force.)  This optimal lateral body position not only unlocks the feet to allow the tipping as Harald describes but creates additional rotational torque (sorry for the tech talk) to also allow for easier steering for his "brushed carved turns". Just turning the upper body (zipper) alone isn't what creates the power and Harald addresses this with hand position.  I'm not contradicting what Harald is saying here. I am simply pointing out why some of his things work and approaching it from a different point of view. 

    Just to be clear, I think Harald has one of the best systems out there. And even though my personal approach is a bit different conceptually I think he offers a no bull direct approach to skiing which is generally lacking in the ski instruction biz. Also, really important is ALIGNMENT and proper foot support.  Harald is big on this and I can't stress this more. 

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    One of the best instructional videos I have seen 

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Very good – очень хорошо.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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     One of the keys to success and balance in skiing was thrown out by the ski teaching world 20 years ago and has handicapped skiers ever since.
    A wide stance is unproductive for learning and making short turns. A wide stance locks up your learning, and leans you toward the inside ski, a wide stance makes it difficult to transfer weight without extending. A wide stance makes it much harder to tip both skis equally, numerous disadvantages make a wide stance un-functional, not an advantage. Tradition Ski Teaching uses a wide stance because they teach a snow plow. The PMTS system, is Direct Parallel, it doesn't need a wide stance. Use a narrow stance to learn and become a balanced skier. If you want to be an elegant skier, use what gives you connecting movements generated by PMTS Direct Parallel.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    right now i lack rhythm and still take long turns. awesome tips i can use. thanks!

    btw, i luv your background music? what's the title and who're the musicians? 😉

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    This is really easy to fix, you have to flex the leg more. If you don't there is weight on that ski, and the LTE is catching. Without weight on it it won't catch. Check out my "Phantom Move" video on You Tube it will show you how. Thanks, Harald

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    When I try to release to the LTE flat it tends to trip a lot. So… if I'm releasing to turn left by flattening my left leg to the LTE first(this was one footed release)… my ski will get caught in the snow and I fall over, lol. Any solutions?

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    I just can't wait for practice!

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Next step is the Practice 9 video, flexing.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    @diveratakan Think of it as, not simultaneous, you have to start tipping with the old stance ski edge, off the holding downhill edge. This will create a simultaneous look! Skiing movements aren't really simultaneous, although it looks like it is and many teach it, although it's incorrect.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Great video and instruction!! This drill will be my main goal for the next season, I tried it already and I know it is very difficult, but I won't give up. I want this type of carved turn to be my basic turn because it gives best speed control and it works in all conditions.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    I have tried your methods but faced some difficulties when the snow was messy, bumpy or icey. When I combined your methods with the up and down movements before tipping the inner ski (previous stance ski) and then moving side wards (across the fallline) towards the snow made things much easier. Am I doing things correctly?

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    I tried your metods recently and it worked well on less steep slopes but when the slopes were steep or the snow was bumpy or during the end of the deay, things did not work well. When I tried to focus on tipping the inner toe towards the snow, I missed some times the balance as I loose concentration on the stance ski. Sometimes concentrating on the lightning and tipping of the inner ski, lead to I missed the balance on the stance ski and ended up in the "back seat" of the ski boot.. Any tips?

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    As a pretty ordinary skier I am looking forward to trying this out on my holiday soon. I would like to know though at what point during these slow short turns does your weight cross the skis and whether this is a gradual or quick process.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    @olafhermans It only feels good because you may never have felt what you can do with balance, rather than stability. With a balanced stance, the energy from the turns goes way up and the ski gives you a better arc. Wide stance, makes the skis drag, because the center of mass is too far inside and your line of force is not going to the outside ski.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    @olafhermans Wide stance gives you stability; it does not teach balance. We teach balance and use of the ski. Balance is the most important part of skiing, without it advancement is limited.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    @diveratakan Always tip to the little toe edge first when you release; before applying tipping to the big toe edge.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    You may have an alignment issue with your boots or try to tip off the old stance big toe edge (downhill ski) onto the little toe edge to being the tipping toward the new angles. You can visit my web site and look through the free on line instruction; to see some photos and movements that explain and demonstrate this.
    harbskisystems

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Ski wide stance ski ugly!

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    @skiwhh we must me doing something wrong then ; on snow it feels good though 😉

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    @olafhermans To bad your students don't get the benefit of balance and efficient movements that we get with our "Essentials of Skiing" , PMTS system, used in the new world. In Europe, you are still thinking you are current, when in fact, you are actually the old school teachers, of old school techniques. Wide stance is old school ,have you not watched World Cup slalom? My students don't do GS Super G or Downhill.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    nice explanation… in Europe we never teach students to keep theor skis that close to eachother; it's pretty old school and makes the exercise more difficult than with a wider spread… still tthumbs up for clear instruction

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    @dbntina Thank you, we are committed to producing and educating skiers with the best materials. Have a look at the "PMTS Form" and our web site for further information. Also I have 24 videos up on YouTube check them out.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    I love this video and watch it constantly. I love all of Harald's videos, but this one in my opinion is the best. Everything you need in one video in 6 minutes to ski like an expert.

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Very good. 2-footed release is often mentioned, and is the name of a drill but not really defined (and I have read all books & seen all the DVDs.) Is it fair to say that the TFR is both skis releasing & tipping at once as opposed to the Phantom and SP where the downhill releases first?

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  • June 20, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Brilliant excercise!

    As Harald says this drill is not easy to master at first so persistence is essential. It's my favourite drill to practice.

    The linked turns (4.45) shows how mastering the slow drill leads to the type of turns we all need to master.

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