this is something that I've needed for a while a large crosscut sled there's going to be a simple build nothing too fancy I'm starting off with a piece of half-inch Baltic birch ply when you use half-inch any kind of half inch ply what you have I happen to have Baltic birch plywood for the back of the sled use a nice straight piece of wood I've got a piece of five four to Papa here that's nice and straight if your eyeball down the board it doesn't have any bends in it you can also laminate 3/4 inch plywood together but you want something a little bit thicker than say 3/4 of an inch for the front of the sled I'm using two pieces of poplar that have laminate together this is for another project and I'm going to get started by first attaching the front of the sled to the plywood by screwing up through the bottom of the plywood into this board I'm setting up the sled how it will be pushed through the sword I'm just going to mark right where the blade will be pushed through or come through this looks I wouldn't want to hit a screw with the blade I'm using squeeze clamps to hold the board in place and attaching the board with inch and 5/8 drywall screws for the runners first I've cut a piece of material a little bit less than an eighth of an inch and I'll slide that into the miter slot on both sides now I'm working on the runners that will be attached to the bottom of the sled these are made out of maple you want to use a hardwood I've measured in mark just about every six inches and I'm going to pre drill and countersink holes at the marks now place the runners in the miter slots with the countersink facing down now place the sled on top of the runners and I've set the fence at the table saw so I know where I want the sled to line out I'll put a mark at the center of the runner on both runners now I'm using a framing square to draw a line and that way I know when I nail I'm nailing into the center of the runner I'm attaching the runner with three-quarter inch pin nails and I've written down the measurements so I know that I'm avoiding the countersink and I'll nail at two 9/16 and 20 so it really it really depends on where you've drilled the holes but you just want to avoid putting a nail into one of the holes that you drilled I'm using a hand screwdriver to make sure I don't strip the screws okay well something was off anyway I'm going to have to cut these off on it or what I was thinking but I'll just cut these off with the pull saw and then attach the runner and I can use a longer screw here because I'm going into the front of the sled I've raised the blade and now I'm going to cut through this lid and stop about four inches from the back before I attach the back of the sled on the fence I'm going to trim it down a little bit at each end so now I've got the sled back on the table saw I haven't attached the back yet this is just here so I can trace a line and then I'll move the sled or move the back and I'll drill holes about half of an inch from that line and countersink from the bottom notice I'm not countersinking the top I'll make the countersink from the bottom I attach the fence or the back of the sled with one screw right here now using a framing square and the curb that's in the sled I'll adjust the fence until it's nice and square clamp it down and then finish attaching the fence with screws from the bottom I just added this block of wood for safety something to house the blade maybe I'll paint that red you just want to make sure that you keep your hands away from where the blade is coming through the slide now I'm going to cross cut this piece of quarter inch plywood and we'll see how square it is all right well that worked out really well this the sweat is cutting nice and square and it did take long to build it's going to be a big time-saver I really should have made something like this a long time ago just for whatever reason I didn't I've always had shorter sleds but this is going to be great because now I can just set up a stop block cut a bunch of bookshelves or cabinet signs and it's going to just be really easy so I hope you enjoyed the video thanks for tuning in and I'll see you next time you

Easy to Make, BIG! Table Saw Crosscut Sled
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44 thoughts on “Easy to Make, BIG! Table Saw Crosscut Sled

  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Hi Jon. Another great video. Thanks!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    hmmm – been trying to figure out how to cross cut 4×8 sheets of plywood myself – i guess this is still too short for that

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Jon why is the rear fence about 4” in front of the back of the sled?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Excellent video and process. Thanks for sharing..

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    You didn't have to do the 5 cut method?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Good Job!
    What size is the sled?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    what size is the sled?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Thank you for sharing this video, very helpful.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Thanks again Jon for easy and simple design. Have a wonderful day.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Good video. What is the benefit of making a full crosscut sled with a bottom riding on wood rails and a back fence as opposed to using a piece of hardwood for the front fence that is bolted to two miter gauges? I've seen several crosscut sled vids and most make a full sled but never go into any explanation of its benefits.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Well Jon, as I have poured through YouTube looking at the multitude ways of making a crosscut sled, I find that the crosscut sled you have built to make the most sense. Especially, Jon, the width, seeing this sled being built and avoiding the one problem area I personally ran into was the width of the sled base. I found my sled to narrow and it would not support the boards I was trying to cut. You produce a good quality video Jon, well lit, good camera angles and a clear voice. Well done Sir.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    im going to be a minority on this issue but, this is my experience with sleds to date.

    since i have been woodworking and doing trim carpentry ( about 3-4 years) ive seen many people using these for various reasons. "safety" being one of them.
    my main purpose for one of these is small cuts on job sites where i find myself fixing or trying to hide the mistakes of others. Im a painter but, started doing other things because a lot of "carpenters" are not what they call themselves these days.
    so far i have 3 in my shop that are unusable because i can never get them square and i have found trying to make one of these more dangerous than the cuts the sled is supposed to keep me safe from.

    ive found trying to use them to be more dangerous for various other reasons too but, dont have the time to type them out on a phone.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Nice sled John, I built one about this size a while back but decided to make a smaller one recently because I got tired of dragging it around for smaller cutoffs. Plus I'm running out of room in the shop lol…

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    I haven't seen this level of craftsmanship since Norm Abram.
    Your videos are exceptional, love the attention to detail for the viewer.
    Thank You

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    John I love your videos and how you attack your projects. I'm a commercial carpenter by trade and have been slowly getting into woodworking. I started with cleaning/tuning/sharpening my dads and grandfathers old hand planes and saws. I just finished putting together an older Delta Milwaukee Homecraft table saw with the tube style fence. It's has a 1/3 hp motor on it which Boggs down while trying to cut through 2" hard maple for my work bench. I plan on getting a new motor for the saw and wanted your opinion. Is it worth trying to get started in woodworking while going through the struggles of older tools and equipment and if so will 1 1/2 hp be enough to cut through hardwoods?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Hi Jon good job! I see you did not use the "5 cut method" for squaring the rear fence as many other youtoober's do. Do you find the framing square method accurate enugh for woodworking? I wonder if one needs to be within 3 or 4 thousandths of an inch!! Does a wood joint care?? Thanks man!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Can you add a T-slot rail to the inside back fence so you can have a stop block position for repeat-ability? Just a thought. Great sled!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    hola, que buena caja te hiciste, gran videos tienes te felicito y me suscribo.
    ahora una pregunta ¿como podria hacer una caja asi, pero que se pueda cortar en ángulos de 18 y 13 al mismo tiempo?
    gracias.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    I like how you painted the blade cover red. I heard about your video from the boys on the making it podcast. Thanks for the video.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Easy to Make, BIG! Table Saw Crosscut Sled

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    I do not understand ! why everyone here is wood? there a better system you Take an aluminum plate approximately 10 mm flat éppaiseur well, then you use a reinforcement on each side in front and behind of 20 or 30 mm éppaiseur then you adjust, tight and you cut may go it gently is still metal and everything will be for the better, stop nagging you to do here in wood, and in terms of tabs below masif made here in stainless steel or strips provided with adjustable wheels for games, these not complicated!.
    I guess here must make some may laugh aluminum is more stable than wood.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Ah, thank you – very nice, lean and simple design with a few good tips and tricks. Bob (Making it podcast) sent me to watch this sled video. Don't know how I missed it – I've been a subscriber for a while. Anyways – love the video and also very much enjoyed your episode of the woodworking podcast together with Jay and Nick. Keep up the great work – thanks for sharing and cheers!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    I work in steel mostly. I don't even need one of these, but I really want one anyways. Thanks for sharing Jon! Cheers!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    What brand is that tapered countersinking drill bit?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Why didn't you run the original boards through your plainer first?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Good Job! Glad to see I'm not the only one who has an oops (%^%%) once in a while. All the best.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Jon Peters, I would like to thank you for all of the great woodworking videos you upload on youtube, I love how you explain things in detail. Thank you.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Nice. What are the approx. dimensions of the sled?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    That is one of the nicest saw sleds I have everr come across. Good job.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Thanks. Enjoyed your video…rr

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Easy and to the point, thanks for the video

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Thanks for the video! This will help me when I tackle my cabinet projects.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Me Gustaria que le traducieras al Español soy Peruano y me encanta tus videos son buenazos

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Nice build by the way. I do envy your shop space. 😎😁

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    I made my cross cut sled and purposefully let the miter guides stay long. I just rounded the ends so it would be a smooth transition to getting the sled to lay in the slots.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Hi Jon. Love that you tanke the 5 sec. to mask before painting. Says a lot about you. You might want to take off the inside corner between the sled and the fence so that saw dust doesn't mess up your 90 degree cut.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Hi Jon,
    Nice build! It looks like the poplar on the front of the sled used to be the door jamb that you used for your Soss hinge video 🙂

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Darn nice. I have been needing to make one, but deciding where to store the sled while it's not in use is my delima.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    No glue on the front or the back vertical pieces. Not needed or is there a reason?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    I would like to see your method of sizing the runners so there is no wobble.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Jon, I am thinking of purchasing a good table saw. What are , in your opinion, the best features/options one should look for when purchasing a quality saw. I value your comments and videos

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