Do SNOWSHOES Work? | Testing In DEEP SNOW, Bear Paw, Ojibwa Designs

26 thoughts on “Do SNOWSHOES Work? | Testing In DEEP SNOW, Bear Paw, Ojibwa Designs

  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    Gotta love playing in the snow! What's your favourite snowshoe design?

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    That actually surprised me the bear paws had more floatation

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    Rather surprising the that bearpaw snowshoes had more flotation than the objibway's. I have a set of 16×48 Huron pattern snowshoes that I use for fresh powder snow and for trail breaking. I also have a set of 15×32 modifies bearpaws for use around camp and in the bush. Both work well for me and my girth.

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I see why those bear paws are so great for in the bush

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I don’t know why I am watching this as I come from Australia but I find it fascinating. We do have snow but I haven’t needed snowshoes as yet.

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I have both types, Bear paws are better in the woods. On potential weak ice Ojibwa could be safer. Thanks

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    👍😊 everyone's out of shape when it comes to snow hiking
    Good experiment

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    You are the fu{<in% bomb! I’ll trade you 6 dozen of my hand tied trout flies for a 3rd of that snow. Just hypothermic power rain storms here in the south.
    Loved the video. Keep em coming, brother!

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    Great video comparing the 2 sets of snowshoes and walking without them. It's amazing how much snow is displaced with the snowshoes and it looks like you would get pretty tired, in a short amount of time, without them. This is a great example of a picture being better than words.

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I have a set of 48" x 16" Hurons which were made in 1958 that my Dad gave me when I was 10 yrs old. I'm 64 now, and still have them. They work great on open ground, lakes, fields, ski-doo trails. I have bear paws too, 14" x 32", and I like them in underbrush as they don't get hung up like the Hurons do. This Christmas, my wife got me some modified Bear paws 10" x 36" and they float as much as the other Bear paws (same surface area I guess) but, legs don't need to spread out as much. So, for underbrush, modified bear paws seem to win over regular ones.

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    Thanks for sharing the results of this experiment . This should put to rest any remaining doubts about the effectiveness of snowshoes .

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I prefer the Ojibwa's I have the 12 x 60 and dressed for outside weight about 190-200 lbs. I love them just for the way you do not have to change the width of your stride.

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    Great side to side comparison Harlan. Thanks for taking the time to play in the snow 🙂
    Nate

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    Love it man. I have so many different snowshoes. I have three different huron type snowshoes made from aluminum, plastic and traditional wood. We like lots of "backcountry" or "alpine" snowshoes here in the Rockies to walk on steep trails or breaking trails through trees.

    That being said, I feel like I need some Traditional Wood Bear Paws after watching this. I have been looking at them but this helped a ton!!! I have been doing a lot of lower valley flat deep snowshoeing and the bearpaws look like the ticket.

    Thanks man and keep the videos coming. 1 a day would be nice!!!

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I'm outta shape too but people tell me that round is a shape so that makes me feel a little better. Mostly bear paws here in Northern Maine.

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I use "el cheepos", but if I were to invest in some I would go with the Bear Paws. They just look cool, and apparently work. I could have used them last week when I had to check my exterior house vents .Excellent vid, and Thanks!

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    The test say's it all 👍I think the bearspaws would be the better choice for the forest and the other for open country , thank's for the video, Sylvain , Québec

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I thought snow shoes were way more effective keeping you above the snow since the area was distributed to a larger surface. Still looks like a lot of work walking in snow.

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I have the OJibway, but since I'm already bowlegged I need the Bear Paws. Good video, Thanks

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    Thanks for the "test". I went for a trip with Lure of the North and we used Bear Paws. They mentioned the others and have the others but we traveled on Bear Paws… Now I see why. Again wonderful demo here.

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I’m in the debate right now of which design to get.. might end up with both, or try the Alaskan style as well

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I have old Ojibway and love them over my newer Sherpas although they are great. Problem most people have is using snowshoes too small. That are made for packed walking trails not for lake or bush hiking with a pack on or pulling a sled. Nice experiment. You got a lot of snow

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I've got a few different designs and each one has it's own best use. Green Mountain style – use with not alot of snow and they are light. Michigan/Hurons – like a Bear Paw with a tail. Lots of flotation but not the easiest to walkin and heavier. Maine – long 60" but lots of flotation and great for trails. OJibway. good on trails and in deep snow. The upturned nose allows the shoe to be slid foward in a traditional x-country type glide, which takes less effort. I used these this past weekend in 30" (measured) of snow. I'm also always using ski poles. Great video, Harlan! Thanks.

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    Bear paws for me. Most of my deep snow walking is in the bush. Snowshoes are a must.

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  • May 25, 2019 at 12:44 pm
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    I found this very educational, I have never worn snowshoes, but watching this video, I want snowshoes now, it definitely makes walking easier in the deep snow.

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