you hi everyone is Gerry November 28th 2018 was a day of tiebreaks for the World Chess Championship match what brought us to this point 12 classical time control games all producing draws which brings us to now a rapid format a best-of for rapid games 25 minutes apiece with a 10 second increment should it be tied after that we play then a blitz format 5 minutes apiece with a three second increment at the end of this one day a world champion will be determined so I'm going to share all the games that took place on this one day November 28th and along the way you'll know I've included an evaluation stockfish 9 it's evaluation so you can see how play is changing throughout while I make for the most part some like comments along the way opening wise rapid game number one Carlsen with white he kicks off with c4 Caruana replying with e5 this is already a position we have not seen in the any of the classical games in English on board with a big focus in this game on d5 black is trying to get that in white has enough support for it and so black looks to chip away at a pawn that is supporting d5 so how to react to this pressure well Carlsen reacts energetically in the center ignoring the pressure and says I'm gonna try and overtake 'if I've a point Caruana is not going to give up so easily it is now secure the bishop is ready to play and with this next sequence a3 white is giving up upon in order to obtain the bishop pair that's the main imbalance at this stage now play from here is going to be on the Queen side that's where there are some gaps for both players the knight now on a4 is eyeing up a couple weak points and given time white would like to exchange Queens and drop into b6 hitting the rook and conveniently picking up c4 if white is able to do this win the material back he will stand better because in the end black will have a poor structure on the Queen side so first it's defended on is hung on two queens are exchanged some more development for both sides some control of the night with f3 rook to b8 Roxy one rook b3 it's defended in our reposition of the night white is eyeing up son some bishop f1 move to put pressure on c4 but black is there in time to defend so where do we go from here the knight is a little bit vulnerable on that square so some pressure on it now considered best in the computer zizes Knight to be 7 fighting for the c5 square not an easy move to make strictly defensive move that's not the move played in this game a lot of time was spent on this next move Knight b5 now one of the top suggestions is f4 here now it's jumping back over to Knight c5 Knight c5 was the move played now before you make this move one of the reasons why or the main reason why Caruana had to think so much about this move is because there is a forcing reply and black has to have a good follow-up at this one key moment so let's see what that moment is after Knight b5 the knight does jump in hits the rook and you have to capture on b2 there is nothing else all right the night is pinned along the D file so rook takes being Knight takes Bishop all forcing and from here best move is Bishop takes c4 now that's the move that was played but pop quiz to you what would you do as black if Bishop g5 was played this is something Caruana calculated before he played the knight b5 move if Bishop g5 here black to move what would you do feel free to pause the video okay let me show you what that would be Bishop g5 trying to kick away the rook from defending the knight can be met with Knight d4 and black wins what a star move a star reply to Bishop to g5 the idea Bishop takes rook would be met with checkmate in to notice the great strengths of rook has patrolling the opponent's second rank combine that with just one other piece and you have a fantastic mink additionally Caruana also had to tad to assess that in this position what if the knight was captured well after the recapture he also understood that he would stand better here winning with these two connected past pawns even though he is down a minor piece yeah completely winning for black here okay well no Bishop g5 is tempting as it is Bishop takes c4 Knight d4 Knight takes and from here you could take on d4 you could take on e6 in the game Bishop takes 6 was played I want to have a look at this move rook takes d4 King f7 and throw another pop-quiz your way how exactly would black get out of the following pin if white plays rook to d1 what should black do feel free to pause the video ok this is another very cool C quince if white played rook d1 the knight can move to get out of the pin rook takes Knight is once more met with Knight takes f3 if the King goes to the corner we've already seen this checkmate and the only other option is here what would result is a perpetual check this is a way out for black a very cool sequence the knight jumping in to d4 into f3 or yeah the night from b5 going in to d4 and f3 or the night going from d7 and e 5 into f3 what a fantastic resource that black has connected with this fantastic rook okay in this game it was Bishop takes c6 and we go down this path noticed Knight here is not working at this stage because of rook takes rook with check it's a big difference so after a king here we have some exchanges and we enter a rook and pawn endgame where white is up upon however black's rook stands very well cutting off the white King both of these pawns are past the black King is also we can say more active than the white King so how to proceed from here first a check your white pawns get rolling an idea here is to maybe advance and then the rook has a pivot square looking to put some rank pressure on the pawns look to maybe get past this past black pawn it gets rolling rook d5 straightaway it's defended white hangs on to the H pawn may be hinting that he's ready to come over here and well the H pawn won't follow them c4 f5 check King f6 white is ideally placed now behind the passed pawn it's not easy to get these pawns rolling h5 is played clamping down on this structure it remains a level position King F 1 rook c3 King g2 at first I didn't understand why King g2 instead of f2 there is an idea behind that the King has the possibility to hide in some line on h3 rook takes a rook takes C Black has a strong post with the king even though the White King is stepped up by a rank it remains cut off you know the rook the black rook is doing a good job keeping the king cut off from the ball game so rook c7 at this stage and now an important moment for black who at this stage does not have a lot of time neither player has a lot of time call it you know we're no longer playing rapid or even blitz these guys are in bullet mode living off of increment about a minute apiece and at this moment a check was not thrown in top move rook a – but instead King takes e4 and we see a massive shift in the evaluation now is this something white capitalizes on it is rookie 7 follows in we're going to see how play continues from there the idea with rook a 2 is to continually and give checks so king of three rook h3 and what do you do you hide here at this point there can follow a king takes e4 and after rook takes pawn there's this idea of rook a 1 and if the rook comes over here then we can have rook F 1 and the rook can grab the pawn and this guy will live the problem with the approach Caruana took is that after king takes e4 white does not have to take the pawn so inserting this check on e7 is a key move grabbing the pawn would allow rook a to and after a king h3 rook f2 so similar idea as the previous variation I shared this is considered a draw and position one timely check however means that after rook takes g7 at this moment the king will be able to take up a nice post on h3 and because the king is on f5 nearby there will be a fork and white we'll be able to pick up on this is what happens we enter this rook and pawn endgame where the white rook is ideally placed right behind the pawn and it's actually a very instructive moment at this stage King to g2 now instinctually I'd be looking at the move King to g4 but this is not a win so let's have a look at why that is the case the reason it's not a win is because after a to where does the King go King wants to move forward you don't want to go to one of these three squares because well the rook would give a check in black promotes and if you go here here this pawn is no longer defended and so black can say I'm okay with giving up this pawn I want to get this one and I will make a draw so first the King goes to g2 watches out for these rook moves with check prevents any of this rook F 1 G 1 H 1 and slowly the idea here is to advance with the pawns so he starts with h5 King moves over g4 King moves over again keep in mind what would white do if the pawn moved King has to go back to one of these two king h2 and then white is ready to advance and give check-in I think you don't even need the assistance of the King at this point the white pawns in the rook are going to pose a serious threat soon enough to black and the rook will have to abandon defense of this pawn so what is played here is King to g7 King h5 a to King g5 just in the nick of time there is no check-in in advance for Queen King of seven pawn marches a check is thrown in the pawn is picked up and from here after King to h5 this game goes no further Caruana resigns and rapid game number 1 goes to Carlsen now how exactly my play have continued if we put some more moves on just following an engine line there's this idea of rook to e7 providing some shelter for the King when he tries to get active so let's just say the rook plays here King g6 check King a 5 check King f6 check you can now block and next you can look forward to advancing the pawns g6 something like this there's even a check at this point or many different ways you could do it finally give a check like that and go on to win so I just want to give you a taste for how play could have followed from this point and I found this one really instructive to see the King go to g2 and only after the ponds have inched up a little bit more did the King returned to get in front of the pawns very instructive moment in this endgame in rapid game number one final position right here of rapid game one so moving on to rapid game number two so let me go ahead and bring that up rap a game number two we have Fabiano Caruana with white a game that he really needs to strike back with so he kicks off with E 4 and we revisit in opening we saw in the classical portion that is a Sicilian version akov moves 795 and we follow game 12 for a little bit in this one c4 Knight g6 Queen a for Bishop d7 Queen before and some variety now Queen b6 in this rapid game simply defending d6 I believe it was in game 12 the bishop ended up moving to f5 Queen b8 here h4 h5 some more development and that needs to go back Queen is getting kicked around she goes home with an eye on h5 so black can't just Castle so easily for as long as white maintains pressure here alright the rook would not be there after castles so some more development for each side the knight is under control with g3 Bishop e2 and with this sequence black is offering a light square bishop exchange more development rook to c1 game 12 out of this opening the white ended up castling queenside well you're not going Queen side this time around now that to c1 is on board light square bishop tsar gun so how does black complete development still castles would drop the pawns so comes up with Queen f5 this is a strong post for the Queen watches this and looks to support e form now from here we have c5 striking it d6 one way or the other white will have a passed pawn also Queen b5 is nearby so if black captures on c5 white can immediately recapture and then follow up with Queen b5 to get the piece back i believe white would be the better side here we do not have a capture this tension is ignored by Carlson he castles in Caruana pushes so again one way or the other there's going to be a passed pawn within this sequence not only is there a passed pawn but now there is a nice square for the knight on d5 the white knight in this position stands better than its counterpart g6 so from here some pressure on the past pawn it's defended and now Bishop to d8 is met with Knight to d5 now this does give up a big square some control over eform black makes use of this fact that he can get efore in and this knight is soon to be really strong all right it's eyeing up the e5 square c7 is well the very forcing move first of all instead of E for note something here after 95 if it is challenged with Knight to e7 white can push and try and distract the bishop away from the knight that can be very painful Knight takes Knight with a 4 no Knight challenge efore on board c7 follows and black gives up the bishop for upon valuable pawn past pawn is now gone Knight takes Bishop is now met with Knight to e5 there's still a pin here and this knight which was once just a pretty poor piece is now an absolute best piece for black play follows from here Knight d5 preparing to me rook takes Queen with 97 fork getting the Queen and white would be better with this sequence in the end two minor pieces outweigh the rook so what does Carlson do he says I'm just going to sidestep the fork King h7 and this game is over rapid game number two Fabiano resigned there is simply no good solution to the threat on the Queen I both Knight and rook and also these light squares the king is still caught in the center no good solution here for white also there's no idea to capture on c8 two rooks for the Queen because the Queen is also there if Queen to b5 play can follow with rook takes rook if this game continued after King to h7 get exchanged rooks and then drop a knight in to d3 what a killer hitting the bishop hitting f7 that's one of the things black gets by exchanging rooks on c1 distracts the bishop from defense of f2 there's just no good solution here this would be checkmate and well if you go here there's you have your pick you could give check and get the rook one way or the other right King here there's also a check there's just no good solution and white is not even close to causing the black King any problems so he threw in the towel and this was a a very difficult one to be sure losing with the white pieces and now down to Oh which brings us to rapid game number three a must-win game for Cara Juana and it is now carlson who has white in rapid game number three so let me bring this game up okay here we go rapid game number three Carlsen with white opening with e4 and for the first time we have a reply Sicilian defense by Caruana so let's see how play develops from here ecigs looking for something sharp white is focused on d5 in this game let's see how play develops night see – you have to be careful here already is white Bishop to e3 runs into Queen b6 and it's difficult to find a great move here Queen putting pressure in multiple directions so no Bishop to e3 you'd like to develop and defend but not here the knight gets out of the way 9si to play follows with Knight f6 Knight c3 castles Bishop e3 b6 – ideas to think out of the bishop and secure this point if ever a capture upon is pulled towards the center in black is then keying in on the weakest square in wise camp d4 from here Bishop e2 it should be seven castles Queen e7 just getting the pieces all in play and from here we have finally a capture on c5 yeah White has to be a bit careful at this stage making a passive move let's just say defending move of e4 after the knight is has moved to e5 there's no pressure on e4 so if f3 right now black can now react with d5 has enough support for this advance so Carlsen goes for a sequence a capture on the c5 square and now gives the knight a kick doesn't give black time just yet to get in d5 Knight g6 Queen e3 to defend and prevent this d5 break this is a big focus in this game both sides keying in on d5 black wants to get that in and white is prepared to make several exchanges on that point first d6 d5 right now you could take and if a capture we're gonna have a lot of pieces exchanged in the end these pawns will be split not much to play for black has to keep this in mind if it liquidates too much well that's not this is a must-win situation so from here d6 some doubling on the D file some defense over b6 by black RB 5 excuse me Queen c7 consolidating moves for each side now g3 the night is under control so the queen is free to go elsewhere the bishop is repositioning basically all pieces are focused on d5 for each side the bishop the rook and at this moment here after blacks last move black is threatening to play d5 so just to share if the bishop backed up d5 is available because after this capture and to recapture the rook is hit alright to me the rook is hitting the Queen and nearby there is this advance so white addresses that break gets the Queen off of the same file as the rook and now the night is repositioning it's a dead piece for as long as the pawn is on g3 so it is now drifting towards the Queen side some regrouping and now in advance on the Kings side pressure on c3 to defend the knight or just move the knight it's moved some pressure on c5 or that is a focal point for white to pieces on that and with E 5 nearby this position can be cracked open shortly Queen c7 is now met with E 5 and this causes both rooks to be exchanged and we enter an endgame where it is a minor minor pieces and Queen so both rooks are gone and this one Knight takes e5 there go both rooks and at this point you can now capture on this square because after takes Queen takes there's Queen takes f4 and there's no way black can be fighting for some win here with a strong queen position in the bishop it remains an excellent piece so what do we have the bishop backs up preserves the bishop leaves this pawn up for grabs that would be a blunder the knight can be attacked there is a check nearby so no knight takes a six simple capture on e5 material is bounced black now gets active with the Queen Knight d7 welcomes some exchanges black does not invite the Queen forward Queen B – if Knight takes Knight Queen takes and this is a problem there's checks nearby so Queen B – placing white and a pin black has the more active Queen from here Queen d6 threatening a check maybe also a capture from here Knight takes Knight if Queen takes Knight let's have a look at this variation there can follow Queen f8 Knight takes f6 and after pawn takes this is a way that white can end up giving a perpetual check so Knight takes Knight Queen takes Knight Queen takes Knight and in this position I was thinking you can take the knight that is not the case taking the knight is not a good option here for white if Bishop takes Knight what can follow is Queen B 1 and Bishop takes c6 followed by Queen takes a 2 it's check and then b3 falls and black is actually decide who is winning so this whole Queen side can fall and this pawn can run so no Bishop takes Knight here instead a check is thrown in Queen takes Bishop there's some communication between the Queen and Bishop the knight is hit twice needs to move but should not move at this moment moving the knight allows Bishop b4 with a 4 so first black gets out of that tactic with a check gives another check the Queen and now moves the knight this allows White's Queen to centralize and some play now with the F pawn two pawns are passed in we have a raised position given time white would like to advance with these pawns in black trying to make the F pawn advance work with a queen and Knight so let's see b4 is on board these pawns already get rolling no time to take b4 because the knight would fall so from here Knight g5 c5 Queen f6 trying to still get in f4 in a check King h2 you're not getting enough for the Queen remains very solid tough to see how you make progress here for black so Queen f6 on this move 42 pawn continues to march tries to stop it 96 white continues to march has a clear plan of advancing all these ponds on the Queen side Knight c7 it's a passive state for the night Queen f4 follows blockading throwing a punch and after 96 Queen d6 what do you do the knight moves a queen exchange you're not going to win that what is tried is a Czech Knight to d4 but white continues to push and there's no stopping the pawn successfully Queen to c3 was played next if the knight played here this is threatening a checkmate in one okay if white promotes a queen game over with Queen to g1 but white can of course defend that and say I will promote only one move later so what is played is Queen c3 Queen c5 in this game we play it out a couple more moves and after Queen to g4 two queens on board it is at this point Caruana knows there's of course nothing to do from this position in south throws in the towel for what is a third time in this tie break three rapid games all of them went to Carlsen and with that he became world-champion up became world champion defended his World Chess Champion title for a third time the tale of the tape on each of these games let's have a quick look this one right here is Game one so you could just see how it progressed the inaccuracies mistakes and blunders average sin upon loss for each this one here is Game two colors reversed Caruana with white that one went downhill fast once the Black Knight ended up on what square was that 'if I've a black knight on e5 at what moment moved 27 yeah it was just an enormous piece and then right here this final game inaccuracies mistakes blunders rapid time control it's to be expected the quality of play will go down and yeah these are the the final stats for this 2018 World Chess Championship it was a fun one to cover and yeah tense throughout really I know the classical portion was not to everyone's liking not having a single decisive game but that just you know shows how strong these guys are and how closely matched they are Carlson said after the match the press conference that this was his most difficult battle in World Chess Championship play and he gave a lot of credit to Caruana he said basically he's you know just as good as I am in this classical portion and yeah it was a fantastic battle throughout I look forward to doing this in future years I hope you enjoyed me covering these 12 games and these rapid formats and if you were tuned in also for the live streams on Twitch again I appreciate your support they're here on YouTube and it's been it's a benefit event to cover once more so my voice is hanging in there this time around so thank you all again for your support in this championship and really for the past decade plus it's been really amazing so thanks again and as per usual I hope you enjoy this video and maybe took a thing or two away from it that's all for now take care bye you

BREAKING POINT | 2018 World Chess Championship Tiebreaks

45 thoughts on “BREAKING POINT | 2018 World Chess Championship Tiebreaks

  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    This was an enjoyable event to cover on both YouTube and Twitch. I hope following along has been a fun and educational experience. I appreciate your continued support of this channel. ❤️
    -Jerry

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    I keep hearing about these guys taking a break going for walks and stuff between moves. What stops them from going to the bathroom and looking at an engine from their phone?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    6:16 I know it’s old but if whit did move his E1 Rook to D1, black then moves his E5 to capture pawn F3. But instead of white capturing D8, what if he moved his D4 rook down to D3 (assuming he would see what black is trying to do)? From here it could go either way.

    Black E5 takes Rook D3
    White D1 takes Knight D3
    Black D8 takes D3
    Then white bishop C4 takes D3

    Same thing could happen except with rook D1 being saved.

    I’m not saying it’s a winning position… but it definitely would get him out of that sticky situation.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    omg stop with the pop quizzes, just get on with it !

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    31:35 What’s the difference between an inaccuracy, a mistake, and a blunder?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    This channel is gold!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    I was rooting for Caruana… I feel like he just gets so unlucky when his best opportunities approach him

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    At 10:56 wouldn't pawn G4 have been a good move?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    I wonder if you or of magnus has ever played mortal kombat chess? If not I challenge you and the so called KING OF CHESS…..

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    It has been probably 10 years since I have played in a tournament. Computer use for preparation is one of the reasons I have lost interest in it to some degree. It was good to see that, even though the first 12 games were all draws, they were all hard fought. I suspect if one of the early games had been won by either player, the following games would have been less interesting. If you get a lead, you play for draws from then on, avoiding risky positions.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    I’m a new player but I’ve been too afraid to play on lichess ladder so I practice against stockfish lvl 1/2 and I usually lose, is playing the engine worth it or should I just play on ladder?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    A fast chess tiebreak was tweaking it in Carlsen's favour. But I guess its a bit like a penalty shoot out, and penalty kicks are part of the game.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    I remember coming home from high school and watching live chess on PBS channel WNET-NYC. Fisher vs Karpov. There was a chess commentator with with curly black hair standing next to vertical chessboard with pockets to hold the pieces in place. There were always a couple of other grandmasters, and another group from a university? with computer analysis. The moves were phoned or faxed backstage and relayed to him. Your clip reminded me of that time. Well done. Excellent analysis.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    worst WCC ever …the two pretty much killed chess…they should have just played the tie breaker straight away

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    of course we enjoyed it Jerry! Thanks a LoT.
    MC finished quick mode having 0 inaccuracies, 0 mistakes, 0 blunders..
    Hard to beat that if you are not alphazero or something..

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    11 average centipawn loss in rapid LOL. Even Stockfish would struggle there!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    With a 3 to 0 win for Magnus, technically I could have played the tie break my self.
    Magnus would also beat me 3 to 0.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    I beat the champ of pa 🙂

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Carlsen is a computer Chang my mind…

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    I was reading these on Wikipedia the other day. I'm thrilled to see this video exists.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Man, you should do the live coverages. Your voice just fits the atmosphere of chess. I love your channel and it makes me want to learn chess even more!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Great job Jerry. I’ve never followed the world championship before, I enjoyed following along with you. Thank you.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    I usually don't beg but can you do a What happened to Leela bot video and ask for her resurrection?

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    @chessnetwork @20:00 except that killer knight is under attack by the white queen.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Enough is enough, I've had it with this goddamn rooks on those goddamn squares.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Jerry, don't forget to congratulate our American challenger who gave a good fight. Great video, as always.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Thank you, a great job. I enjoyed and learned so much.

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Jerry for President!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    You are too good

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Hmm, maybe they should’ve just started with the tiebreakers before the classical matches after all 😉

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    What about Ne7 as the continuation for white after resignation in game 2

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Why is this even recommended to me? I never searched anything about chess…

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Great job, I have enjoyed your commentary very much!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    So carlsen won the rapid championship

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Now we know why Carlsen let the 12th game draw so easily! Thank you for the coverage – thanks to Caruana for putting so much resistance and thanks to Carlsen who finally won in Carlsen-style! He IS the best player, but that doesn't mean he gets an automatic win, it was hard work. Congratulations!!!

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Caruana is a calculative player based on Chess Engines theory while Carlsen is an intuitive player which is more close to human thinktank so he deserves to be the Champion.
    I agree with this great comment presented below by Deepak Sharma, 100%! That is just why Magnus is the real world champion…

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Caruana on mariguana

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Idea:
    Tiebreak infinite time per player
    Ome mistake and your dead

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    Thanks for all your efforts over the past few weeks Jerry.
    There were a lot of options for commentary, I looked at a few, and yours was the best.
    Here's the thing though.
    Blitz or bullet chess requires different skills to classical. Like comparing a sprinter to a marathon runner.
    Few players can excell at both. A few noteable exceptions are Nakamura and Carlsen.
    Caruana was a full 100 points lower than Magnus in blitz chess.
    So was it completely fair that shorter time controls were included as part of the Classical Chess World Championship ?
    There is after all a Blitz Championship, that does not require players to play a classical game in the event of a tie.
    Or looking at it another way, how well would Usain Bolt do in a long distance race ?
    With the popularity of Blitz and bullet chess amonst the playing community now (very much including Jerry), I believe that delineation in the sport is absolutely necessary.
    After all, there is not an Olympic Sport simply called "running" !

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  • June 17, 2019 at 10:48 am
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    If I say "Magnus Carlsen" to someone, they give me a blank stare. If I say "Bobby Fishcer" they know who I'm talking about. Carlsen is a very bad chess ambassador, with his slack play. 6-6? Who's the champion again?

    Reply

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