hi I'm Bodhi Miller and I'm still McNichol and this is Sports School in this episode we're going to show you some advanced concepts and advanced movements that are going to improve your carve turn we're going to talk about linking turns together how you actually crossover with your body from one turn to the next and how important the pole plant can be to pull these things together hopefully we're going to start moving it at some real rhythmic turns how to carry energy from one turn to the next to improve your dynamic movements and improve the radius you're able to pull on a given ski and it will also hopefully help you to control your speed and feel a bit more comfortable carving down the steeper parts of the hill Odie's making clean link turns using his poles to initiate the transition notice how smoothly he waits and on waits from turn to turn here Bodhi is more animated and aggressive shifting his weight he steers the skis through the turn keeping his shoulders facing down the hill he plants his pole at the start of the next turn he maintains a fluid motion throughout the weight shift while keeping a balanced position you actually try to demonstrate and focus a little more on on the crossover and moving down the hill and actually how you utilize your pole plant to bring these motions into your skiing so you can link and go from turn to turn you can maybe you can explain that a little bit more to the viewers I mean on the steeper stuff for sure as you come across the fall line more there's more of a of a traverse at the bottom of your turn your transition to the new turn becomes a little bit more difficult because you're you're more neutral in between that that Traverse your there's not a lot of energy going on you're more traversing the hill starting the new turn is is more difficult it's more of a dynamic balance move as you start to bring your turns more into the fall line you can actually transfer a bit of the energy from the end of one turn allow your ski to continue to carve underneath you as your body transitions over the top and you find the new ski early and you can actually bring in energy from the from the last turn into the next turn I think that's that's that's the move you're talking about it's called the transition with a crossover where your skis cross over underneath your body your body actually takes a bit of a straighter line down the hill while your skis hit that Traverse that transition across and that's where that's where you really start to see the separation between an intermediate skier and an expert skier is that is how they how they maneuver through that transition so remember during link turns unweight at the start of the turn transfer the energy from one turn to the next commit to the fall line and use your poles to assist okay now into the carve turns you see bode really committing to his outside ski with a dynamic powerful carve turn you must commit the outside ski 100% no hesitation and make sure the ski holds and bites notice Foley's commitment to the outside ski as he prepares non weight and transfers energy to the opposite ski again the pole is critical and initiating the next turn now continue to link your turns and practice pressuring your ski by standing strong on the outside ski and use vertical movement to unweight the ski while transferring the energy from one turn to the next okay and dynamic carving bode when you're up there and you're working on a little steeper train you're moving up more demanding more demanding and you have to commit to the outside ski to carve your turns what are you actually focusing on during the activity or for you what do you feel yeah it switches around if we're on the softer snow which I made a couple turns in a little bit more you know groomed but it's definitely soft all you're really thinking about is committing to the outside ski and staying balanced over the outside ski if you overextend yourself and get too far to the inside that's when you put your hand on the ground you get the snow in the face you go on your hip it's just um you know there's a few key balance elements that come in there the first is that pole plant making sure that in the transition at least you move your body forward and down the hill it gets that it lets you establish that outside ski earlier whereas if you if you make that transition back you don't really get to the new outside ski until you're well into the fall line and then usually you know you're over committed to it and you end up inside but um you know as we as we came down onto the easier stuff I would say you know mostly I was thinking about square shoulders keeping my shoulders down the hill and able to stay in the fall and a little bit longer I mean it's definitely definitely a challenge on the rough or snow it's easier when it gets a little bit more remember to use your remote to rewind aggressively commit to the outside ski plant that pole at the top of the new turn and keep the shoulders facing down the hill now you're set to the next level at range and now for the Bodhi factor pay attention to detail the hardest part of skiing is the details you know there's just so many details you can spend all the time you want up on the hill training and doing all the things they're know right but if you don't have the little details worked out as far as racing goes with equipment with relationships with coaches getting the right start positions and you know even lenses in your goggles and the right kind of ski falls lengths and stuff they don't seem like much but that's the stuff that a lot of times makes two or three hundreds of the difference here there makes it Open Safina some sort of technique breakthrough that maybe you would make you

Advanced Ski Turns with Olympic Skier Bode Miller
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10 thoughts on “Advanced Ski Turns with Olympic Skier Bode Miller

  • June 3, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    Leave the poles at home. You're not gonna need them 99% of the time on usual well groomed slopes.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    It would be fun to see them skiing on Himalayas.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    Nice close look at the flow. Thanks and cheers from Canada! 🙂

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  • June 3, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    I promise I will commit to the outside ski

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  • June 3, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    If pole planting is “so essential” why doesn’t bode miller do it when racing ? The clips they have of him from races on here don’t have one pole plant. If it improved his performance, wouldn’t he do it when every 100th of a second counts ?

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  • June 3, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    Leaning and rotating are simple easy movements that get the job – maybe not as elegant as strict lower/upper separation and skillful leg steering. Maybe the ability to ski both ways would be cool – mix it up a bit 😉

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  • June 3, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    …Please stop telling kids to Pole Plant…it's so 1985….the poles are for balance….

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  • June 3, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    Short turns is a very bad… but middle turns is good… During short turns everything is bad: sits in a back rack therefore skis run away forward and become uncontrollable and thereof rows with backs, doesn't cut an arch, and develops skis feet…, internal in general tears off at edge change as in "waited"… And after all he once won in slalom…

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  • June 3, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    This is a bad example for regular skiers. Leaning, and rotation by Bode, he can get away with it, regular people can not.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 4:16 am
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    Silence! Genius shows!

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