hi I'm Jonathan cats Moses and today I'm really excited to share with you this porn 1 crosscut sled I just made it performs multiple functions including a picture frame minor a standard cross cut it does a 45-degree cross cut and a dado cross cut as well it accomplishes this by using moveable runners I put threaded inserts in the bottom of the sled so that you can move the runners both fences are squares so it can be reversed the picture frame miter comes off and I cut holes in the fence so you can cut any size stock they weren't great as hooks so you can put it on the wall when you're done this is a really versatile sled and I packed a lot of information into this video so whether you're building this sled or a standard crosscut sled I think there's a lot of things you'll find very interesting I broke down the william ings v cut method in a really easy to understand way I ran into a couple issues while making this the first one being used I try to use UHMW runners they've worked great for me in the past with much smaller sleds but I quickly found out that they were just not up to the task for this type of sled so you'll see during the video I switched from UHMW to maple runners so if there's some continuity issues that's why the other issue I ran into was stop blocks I had just one heck of a time trying to find a stop block that was the right size you know with the crosscut sled you want a taller fence because you obviously don't want to get your fingers anywhere near the blade there was almost no stop blocks on the market that could reach the base of my sled and then the one that did had so much deflection that it would be almost impossible to do repeatable cuts I'm cranking down as hard as I can on this and it's so easy to move that so I'm really excited to announce that I'm gonna be releasing a stop block of my own design this is the prototype it's absolutely universal so it goes from 2 inches to 4 inches it can come out from the fence so it can be out for larger stock or in for smaller stock it has zero deflection you cannot move this thing it has a micro adjust feature so if you get really close to your cut but you don't want to move your stop block you can micro adjust the face of it it also can be used in any orientation so if you had something like a drill press table where your t-track was in your fence you could use it in this orientation or if you wanted to put t-track in the face of the fence of your crosscut sled for larger stock you could put it here and it can go from two to four inches out so this is gonna be for pre-sale on my website it's gonna ship at about four to six weeks I'm really excited so I hope you check it out there'll be a link down in the description let me show you how I built this we're gonna get started by breaking down our lumber after rough dimensioning my 3/4 sheet of ACX I started cutting down stock for the fences after that I squared up the base which ended up being about three feet wide I glued up both fences in one set of clamps I used this great trick that Nick ferry recently released a video on basically you use two parallel clamps on the sides to keep everything aligned clamp everything up as you normally would and then when you have pressure on everything you can just take the parallel clamps off it worked so well that I barely had to clean up the edges it was a great tip I also took this opportunity to cut up the picture frame miter attachment I use my combination square to set my piece at 45 degrees on my jointing straight line rip jig it's important to cut one piece smaller than the other so that when you join them together you have a place to put your thumbs when you're cross-cutting your picture frame miters you can see how that's gonna work here during the glue up it's really important that you get this square so I used my pin nailer to make sure it didn't move before I clamped it up I like to use my calipers to make sure I get a really snug fit for my runners it's easy to sand them down later to fit but if you cut them too narrow now you're gonna have trouble keeping your sled from moving around when drilling the holes for your runners it's really important to follow an order of operations first you find the center of your runner and punch it with the center punch then drill a small hole where you Center punched I did this through both runners at the same time so that they would have perfectly aligned holes then using a 3/4 inch Forstner bit I set the depth and drove out the recess for my socket head cap screws now it's time to attach the runners to the body I used some pennies in the miter slot to raise my runners up and some double-stick tape here's a little trick I like to use I set the fence exactly at the whip that I want the body of my sled to sit and then I take off cuts for my plywood clamped them against the cast iron of my table-saw and that allows me to put the base of my sled exactly where I want it without having to worry about it it isn't absolutely crucial to do it with this level of accuracy but it will save you a lot of frustration later down the road so if you have a friend around like Josue I suggest you get this as close as you can to square then flip the base your sled around and Center punch all the holes this is what I think is the most crucial part of the project getting these holes dead-on so it really helps if you fall in order of operations again mark the center of your holes and drill them out with a smaller drill breath then when you remove the runners you can find an exact Center for your bigger drill bit and that'll take the threaded inserts I labeled my runners to keep them from getting confused although I tried to drill the holes in the exact same spot you never know so I didn't want to mix them up later down the road using a combination square I drilled my holes as plumb and square as possible it helps if you have a stop for your drill bit but if not use a marker or a piece of tape to mark your depth when you put your threaded inserts in make sure you do them just below the surface this will ensure you get as much of your threads into them as possible the threaded inserts may raise up some wood so when you're done give them a light sanding to ensure that they're flush once you've put in all your threaded inserts it's time to screw in the runners keep close watch that one screw didn't get in the wrong place if it did it will slightly bow the runner you can either redraw your holes in a different location or eliminate that screw altogether now it's time to attach the fences here I'm laying out for where my picture frame miter will go I made my holes about four inches because I think that's the largest stock I'll ever cut it's important that your holes don't interfere with the corners of your insert so be extra careful to make sure that your openings are large enough I took off the clamps and transferred those holes to my fence it was then time to clean up the edges and make sure that they were nice and square and had no glue on them it was at this point that I think I realized I had forgotten to turn on my dust collector when clearing out large areas of material I first like to define my edges that way I can just go ahead and go to town on the middle a little tip here is to use a 3/4 inch dado stack that way you don't have to change blades for cutting in the slot for your tea track using a set of calipers I measured the depth I needed to cut for my tea track it's always a good idea to check and make sure you're on the right track make sure you're going slow on this cut you're removing a lot of material so you don't want to force it I then used a chisel to clean out anything that the dado stack left behind and got ready to chamfer the corners I decided to screw in my chi track rather than gluing it and here's a great little tip I use a drill bit that's slightly larger than the head of the screw and I go very slow until I see the wood just barely pump through the bottom of the hole this allows you to countersink in areas where you can't get a traditional countersink bit you can use woodworking tools to trim aluminum so I just used my beam saw to square up the ends and cut off the excess aluminum when attaching my fences I like to use a framing square to get it as square as possible before I shoot in screws I was really careful to lay out where all the kerfs would be so I didn't put any screws anywhere near that area I then drilled in countersunk holes and put screws in I like to put my kerf almost all the way through the sled before attaching my last vents this helps me get a lot closer to square before I dial it in with the v cut map then I get it as close to square as possible clamp it make sure the face is Square and shoot in two screws one kind of in the middle of the end and then one right at the corner that's going to be my pivot screw for the five cut method William ings five cut method can be a little intimidating so I broke it down as simply as I can basically you calculate the air per inch and multiply that by the distance between your pivot screw and the corner of your fence cut your board on the same side of the blade as where you're going to move your fence if it's a positive number the fence is gonna move towards you and if it's a negative number it's gonna move away from you I'm gonna show you how I calculated it here and give you all of my figures that way you can see exactly how it's done taking an off cut of plywood you're gonna cut all four sides one after another your fifth cut will remove a piece that you're gonna label a and B measure your pieces and subtract them from each other and divide by four then divide by the length of your final cut and this is gonna give you your error ratio per inch my error ratio was pretty small but because my fence was so long it ended up being two one hundredths of an error and because it's a positive number I'm gonna move that fence towards me using a off cut I clamped it directly against my fence and removed the screw holding the fence in place I then put a point O two feeler gauge in between my board and the fence and screwed the screw back in and that should make my fence completely square I didn't show it on camera but I reran the five cut method to ensure that my fence really was square before I drilled holes and shot screws to attach my fence permanently I took this opportunity to fix the mistakes from the UHMW and filled all the holes from my previous multiple attempts at the five cut method now it's time to attach the insert for the picture frame miter using double stick tape I aligned the corner perfectly with the center of the curve this doesn't have to be dead-on but it's got to be pretty close then I punched holes and a lot my runners I followed an order of operations first I drilled larger holes with a Forstner bit I used the marker to mark the depth and then using the center of that hole I drilled through with a smaller drill bit I then use the center punch to get the dead center of the holes remember accuracy is key here so take your time to do this then just like the runners I drilled holes for the threaded inserts I used a combination square to make sure they were plumb and square and put the threaded inserts just below flush I then screwed it to the base of the sled after that it's just as easy as separating the two pieces it was a really good feeling when they came out perfectly square now it's time to move the runners this is going to be a lot of rinse and repeat but it's incredibly crucial that we get things very accurate again using pennies double stick tape and a shim we're gonna spin the sled around and attach the runner in its alternate location because one runner was already attached placing a shim in the center really helped me with alignment and kept the other runner from getting stuck prematurely I held a finger under one side of the sled and slid the shim out and then dropped it right in place making sure to press down to ensure the runner was stuck on there good because the holes had been enlarged by the screws I used a drill bit that was the same size as the hole to lightly mark the center locations then once the runner was removed I could Center punch them and make them deeper just like before we draw out the holes for the threaded inserts remember to give them a light sanding to ensure everything's nice and flat I had one threaded insert that moved due to a knot in the wood and because we put five holes in the runner I could just eliminate that screw and it didn't affect the alignment at all then it was time to set the blade to 45 degrees and make my initial cross cut this is a great feeling because now we're on the homestretch after a few false starts we this thing is really starting to come together then we do the five cut method just like before it's a little bit trickier with a 45 degree cut in that you just have to make sure that your board doesn't twist in your calipers other than that it's exactly the same by an amazing stroke of luck my fence was dead square I didn't actually have to do any adjustments at all now we're gonna switch the runners again and cut the data side I've labeled them here so you don't get confused basically a moves from one side to the other and B moves from one of these side to the other it's important not to get them mixed up here otherwise you can get holes that are maybe not in the exact same location and then again we just rinse and repeat put some coins in a sham place your runner in and set your sled down in the right location if you haven't yet check me out on Instagram it's a great way to keep up with what we're up to in the shop we do lots of giveaways and post pictures of what we're up to on a daily basis head on over there and subscribe @j cats Moses then I stacked up the inside and outside blades of my dado stack and got ready to cut the curve it wasn't necessary but I went ahead and did the five cut method anyways I wanted to make sure that there was no chance that I'd that my fence had gotten bowed or maybe a screw had been put in the wrong place turned out everything was perfect I then went ahead and routed the slot for the T track and screwed it in the same way I did before in the description of the video you'll find a link to the pre-sale of my stop block and a link to all the tools I used here today subscribe if you're new here give this video a like and follow me on Instagram you can support me on patreon if you like and thank you so much for watching all your comments are read and appreciated have a wonderful day and stay safe in the shop

4 in 1 Multi Crosscut Sled – 90 and 45 Degree, Miter, Dado

40 thoughts on “4 in 1 Multi Crosscut Sled – 90 and 45 Degree, Miter, Dado

  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    LOVE YOUR WORK MR.JIMMY KIMMEL KLONE 👐🏾👐🏾👐🏾👐🏾 ….N 👀 MEAN THAT W/ NO DISRESPEKT 2 U SEÑOR KAZ-MOSES 👍🏾👍🏾👍🏾👍🏾

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Do you have plans for this any where? Please?

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Great sled and well explained. Cheers, Huw

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    I think what would make that stop block just perfect (and then count me in!) is if the micro adjust was actually micro adjusted, say with a lead screw or something, vs freely sliding. Otherwise what's the diff than just sliding the block itself?

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    What was the final dimension of the sled base? By the way, putting the t-track in the face of the fence should cure the stop flexing issue. In fact if you had a t-track in both the face and the top, you could actually create a stop block extension for doing repeatable say dados on longer stock (for bookshelves for instance). If you like, I can come up with a Sketchup design utilizing your sled design with some extensions. This sled is pure genious as it is designed and I appreciate your imagination and implementation and hints about what worked for you.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Great tips, thanks for the video and wish you great success in the maker space https:www.simonmetzwoodworking.com

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Turn knobs on the micro adjustments would make that a perfect saw stop.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    What brand of T Track do you recommend using with your Deflection Stop Block?

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Do you have plans for this sled for sale? Good video too.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Great job as always. I love the holes in the fence for longer stock. Never thought of that. Thank you for sharing. I see a better sled coming to my workshop after I seen this.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Yo J Katz. Awesome video. I made one very similar but will be making again to your design. Appreciate all you do for us and love the joint of the week. I asked for a dovetail jig for Christmas. We shall see in a few months.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Hey Buddy, what type of filter is that on your dust collector? Can you give me the product or service#

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    You wouldn't make this and sell me one, would you?

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Question, why make this type of sled versus a panel sled or the other types out there?

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    muy bueno amigo sos un genio!!!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Sweet build! Excited to try out those stop blocks I picked up on pre-order!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    New to your channel. Heard you on The Green Woodworker Podcast.

    1) What kind of centerpunch is that? Been using a yardsale awl for so long I didn't know what it was.

    2) What happened to he-man's hands? 🤕

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Hm. I'd rather make multiple sleds than have to change out the runners.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    This is excellent. Thanks!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Very good explanation, perfectly filmed. Thanks!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    WOW! THAT is a nice table saw sled! Kudos, my friend.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Find some old composite decking or new stuff it works great

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Holy moly of a sled. I couldn’t fit it in my workshop but I picked up some nice tips and that stop block is DA BOMB!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Man you come up with some great stuff, when I upgrade my table saw I might just have to build a sled like this. Awesome stop block BTW!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Though I have a sled I am about to embark on ye old bookshelf build and the Dado idea has me VERY intrigued. This is a great design!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Great sled! And excellent explanation of how the 5-step method works. Will have to check this out again when I build my own sled. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    How do you make sure that your laminated fence is flat and straight?

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Preordered! Nice idea.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    UHMW mows its lawn at 5am.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Nice sled. Its a bit bigger than my shop, but thats just details 😉

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Dood, whatz up wid He-Man???? Liked the plastic jokes. I don’t have Instagram only YouTube

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Quite the sled! Great video.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    A very innovative design.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    I don’t have Instagram but watch you on YouTube bought your dovetail jig which I love!! This sled is amazing!!!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Three words: flat pack kit. Take my money!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    This looks sweet and awesome to use. Do you have any concerns moving the runners back and forth and throwing your sled out of square? That was my only concern, otherwise it looks great!

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Awesome sled and awesome tunes. I love your new stop block too! I guess I will be making a new cross cut sled! Thanks for the video, well done.

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Very good! Just one point – I get that you flipped the sled around between the first and second slot – which way round is the 3rd (dado) slot?

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 5:45 pm
    Permalink

    Thumbs up for UHMW

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *