hey everybody James here and a quick announcement two weeks ago we desire through dovetail tutorial and I just wanted to say that the winner of this dovetail box was a YouTube viewer by the name of Felix from Nebraska and if you are interested you can go to my facebook page and you will see the drawing that took place and how he won hi everybody today I'm going to build another tool for my workshop and I'm going to call this my Xtreme table saw sled and I'll show you all the parts that are involved here basically it is a crosscut sled unlike your traditional crosscut sled and right there is where my cheap microphone decided to stop working but what I was trying to say is it's like a traditional crosscut sled with a lot of added features it will work as a miter sled it will also work as a dado sled or a tenoning jig and the most important feature I think to me at this point was that it's been designed with removable zero-clearance insert plates taking a look at my most recent crosscut sled I made up on my wall there this thing I think probably only lasted me about two or three weeks before I decided to turn it into a dado sled because I had a dado that I had to have cut and of course that makes this gap too wide to use in the future as a crosscut sled because any way that you cut will end up tearing out on the bottom since the gap is too large so before ruining any more of my crosscut sleds I decided to design one that has removable or changeable zero-clearance insert plates I figured if my table saw can have one my crosscut sled can have one and as soon as the sled was made I quickly cut out this picture frame it only took a couple of minutes to cut and the joints are actually perfect then I switched it to tenoning jig mode and I cut this tenon out so that you can have a look at that so to start with I used a half inch Baltic birch plywood to make the sled out of I think it took a little less than a half a sheet of Baltic birch to make the whole sled I laminated it up in a couple of layers thick in order to have the ability to make the zero clearance insert plate I chose to use aluminum miter bars because I can adjust them to have a perfect fit right away and I don't have to deal with any expansion or contraction that might happen should I use wooden miter runners for the sled if you should decide to build this I will have a link to the plans in the description it will be a highly detailed set of plans in 3d and it will include a complete materials list cut lists and everything you knew you need to build the project once I have these miter bars adjusted perfectly I'll need to elevate them just a little bit so they stick above the surface of the table saw I'm using a couple of pennies to do that and I need to do that so that they're high enough that I can glue them to the bottom of my sled a little bit of cyanoacrylate glue applied to the bars is all that's needed to get this to hold I will also spray a little bit of the activator to the bottom of the sled so that the bond will be instant I have my fence locked in on the right so I don't slide this to the right on accident and when I drop it in place I'm just going to try to line it up with the front of my table-saw perfect alignment here is not needed he only takes a few seconds for the bond to cure strong enough for me to lift up the bottom of the sled and the miter bars stay stuck to it there's a couple of different ways that I could have chosen to make this attachment permanent I thought about a wood screw but my plywood is only half inch thick and a good portion of the wood screw is devoted towards making the point and that really substantially reduces the length of the threads that are available to me so I decided to drill all the way through and tap it and send in some machine screws that way I get threads throughout the whole length of the half inch thickness of the plywood after that a countersink bit will ensure that the head of the screw stays below the surface of the aluminum so it doesn't rub there will be a complete list of all the parts used in this build in the description and I would like to say thank you to all of my viewers who use those Amazon links whenever that occurs Amazon sends us a small percentage of the sales and that helps support our channel so thank you very much for the next step in this table saw sled I want to build the front and back fences I'm using two pieces of 3/4 inch Baltic birch for each one and I'll be gluing those together while we're gluing these up I just want to take a minute to thank all of my patreon supporters what all of you do is especially kind and my family and I are very thankful your generous support really motivates us to make the best quality content that we can for anyone interested in helping to support the channel you can find the link to our patreon page in the description after letting these dry overnight I'm going to clean the bulk of the glue off and then take them to the jointer for a quick pass and finally I'll go ahead and cross cut them to their exact length you might have noticed that the back fence is stepped down by about three-quarters of an inch in the rear portion and that is so that I can fit my Craig top track on top of it which will hold the measuring tape for the stop and also a lock-down clamp it's the exact same top track used for the fence for my extreme mitre station build and I thought I would take just a minute to sand off all the sharp edges here's a quick preview of what the top track will look like once it's installed and I will cut that to length on my miter saw aluminum actually cuts pretty easy with the miter saw now that the front fence is complete I'm going to go ahead and mount it to the crosscut sled after clamping it securely I'm going to flip the sled upside down and pre-drill one hole in each corner for now we are only going to mount two screws because this is the fence I'm going to have to make fine adjustments to in order to dial it in to become perfectly square for the back fence I'm going to sketch out a pattern that I like that allows it to be a little bit taller where the blade will pass through and shorter in the areas where the blade doesn't go through I'll have plenty of strength and I'll save a little bit in terms of the weight you can cut this out with either a bandsaw or a jig saw and when that's done just sand up the edges to make it smooth I've cleaned off the burn marks and sanded the edges nice and smooth with my disc sander this would also work really well with a belt sander and then we'll tackle those inner contours with an oscillating spindle sander you also could do this with a belt sander and possibly a random orbit sander it just takes a little bit longer and I'm going to put a 3/8 inch radius round over bit on my router to knock off all the corners on this so that everything is nice and smooth after a final sanding I am ready to mount the back fence when mounting the back fence we just need to keep it flush with the back edge of the sled to look good it doesn't matter exactly where it is because we don't use it for alignment purposes at all I will follow the same procedure I'll clamp it down flip it upside down and pre-drill the screws for this one however I'm gonna go ahead and attach the screws all the way across because I don't have to make any adjustments later once that's complete now is a good time to sand the whole bottom of the sled the sled needs to slide back and forth very easily on the table saw now we're giving to the area where as this sled deviates from your typical crosscut sled construction it is two layers of half-inch Baltic birch thick and here I'm actually cutting a bevel on the top layer to act as a sawdust chute so sawdust will not bind up at the back edge against the fence and cause errors in our measurements after identifying where the blade comes up through the sled at I am going to go ahead and glue the upper board down the sled needs to be built from two layers so that the bottom layer can actually hold the insert plate I will put a little bit of weight on it and let it dry for a few hours before I proceed while that's drying I can take the time to mount the top track I cut it to length with my miter saw and I've drilled some holes in the back now I just have to pre-drill some holes into the wood and I'll use a flat pan head screw to attach it securely to this front fence it's time to make the cut all the way through the sled you can see it is going through both layers of Baltic birch here and I made sure that I did not glue the Baltic birch all the way past the end point so that can remove that little strip that was just cut off now it's time to flip the sled upside down and cut out the bottom portion of plywood a little bit wider I want to make it just a little bit wider than the widest dado blade that I have and the widest one I have is thirteen sixteenths of an inch so I might make this about 7/8 of an inch wide I've used a clamping straightedge saw guide to line my saw lift so I get a perfectly straight line and now we'll take this piece of wood out because it's no longer needed and this will be the permanent opening through which all of the blades will come unfortunately when I put the weight on the top board to glue it to the bottom one I didn't really leave it on long enough and then moving it around has caused it to unstick just a tiny bit so I'm gonna have to go through and put some screws in you might be able to avoid this if you let your glue up sit overnight before you with it so now I'm gonna take the time to resend everything knock all the sharp corners off and then I'm going to apply a paste wax to the bottom I used Minwax paste wax here but I'll apply the paste wax let it sit for a couple of minutes to dry and then buff it off this will make the bottom of the sled very slick and it will slide back and forth very nicely on the table saw now I'm going to cut the top board that will go on to the other side of the sled it will get a chamfer on the edge as well so the dust doesn't pile up in front of the fence to glue this board down I'm going to use my advanced kung-fu glue technique you can see how this board will stop short of covering the entire bottom board and that leaves me a shelf on which to attach my zero clearance insert plate this one's a little bit smaller so I can get clamps in there better to hold it down tightly while the glue dries but just in case I'm going to go ahead and send screws in through the bottom the same way as I did on the first side now that both the top and bottom pieces have been permanently attached together I'm going to temporarily remove the front and back fence in order to run it over my dado blade and put in a couple of slots so that I can have some t-track in the surface of the sled this will be very useful for clamping down small boards or for holding jigs in place and the t-track is also aluminum so it cuts very nicely on the chop saw the trick here is just cut slowly and it'll cut very nice it will have sharp edges no matter how you cut it and so I always like to take a file and file off the sharpness of the edges so we don't get cut on them once that's done it's time to reattach the front and back fence then I'll go ahead and mount the t-track in permanently what I'm using here is a VIX bit VIX as how it's spelled it's a self centering bit it'll drill a hole to the dead center of that opening and allow me to easily put a screw in the center so it won't cause the tract to shift in any given direction and the screw will stay nice and flush at the bottom I've designed it so my zero-clearance insert plates are exactly three inches wide and that's assuming no blade has been passed through them yet and so while I'm here building the slide I'm gonna go ahead and cut a few of these to have in reserve for when I need them and I'll drop one in place for a quick test fit and it looks pretty good so I've laid out some locations roughly equidistant in order for me to put four holes through this zero clearance insert plate I'm gonna drill the holes to be just slightly larger than the screw I'm going to be putting through them once that is done I'm going to place the insert back in position on the sled and I'm going to use that same drill bit and transfer that hole basically drill through that hole all the way through the bottom portion of the sled that way I keep the holes aligned perfectly so I'll flip the sled over and work from the bottom I'm going to be putting a tee nut or a blind nut in from the bottom and I want to use a Forstner bit to drill out a small recess I don't want any metal or anything protruding through the bottom of the of the miter sled at this point and I'll test the depth by putting the t-nut in upside down and making sure the flange is below the surface but as you can see here the t-nuts still won't fit in the hole because it's too big so I've got to drill the hole here a little bit bigger to accept that stepping up and drill bit sizes just a little bit I'm gonna go ahead and drill the rest of these out and then I'll hammer them all down tightly in place and I'll make sure that they are below the surface of the sled so that they don't scrape against the table saw surface after that I will put a little bit of CA glue around all of the edges and that will permanently hold them in place hello once again I've got to go back to my sander any time you drill on the bottom of the sled you're going to cut a scuff the surface up or create some splinters so you'll want to keep sanding it and make sure it stays smooth and I'm going to go ahead and apply a little bit more paste wax to the area that I've just sanded and buff that out for the insert plate I'll need to run a countersink bit into them just to make sure that the heads of the screws are countersunk enough so that they don't protrude through the surface of the sled and I'll screw it all together and see how it works it's time to make my first cut through the insert plate it's good to know that this will always be my zero clearance insert plate for this blade when I switched to my dado blade I'll just switch to a different plate and when I switch back to this one this blade will fit perfectly it's finally time to square that front fence I'm gonna use the v cut method I'm gonna start by marking the first side of the square board with number one rotated clockwise so the number one comes towards my fence and mark the number two and I'll continue through this procedure until I mark all four sides I'll continue a final time to side one and I'm gonna add the number five to it and you'll see how this works I want to point out that I did not invent this method although it is a perfect method I saw it before my before doing it myself from Nick Ferry and I'll put a link to his video in my description and from William Inge and I'll put a link for his as well so we're gonna start by trimming just a little bit off of side number one I'm going to rotate my board clockwise so the one is now against my fence and I'll trim off a small amount from side number two I'm going to continue with that procedure until I have same amount trimmed off of each of the four sides the reason we are doing this four times is because it compounds the error it might be difficult to see if something is off by a few one thousandth of an inch but it's not difficult to see if it's off by four times that amount it's kind of like using a microscope and zooming in real close to see just how accurate it is for the final cut the fifth cut we're gonna slide it over about an inch and I'm gonna cut off a board Oh half an inch to an inch wide somewhere in there and I'm gonna hang on to that board you want to take a moment to carefully mark it well let's mark the top side a and the bottom side B and that's gonna help us do our math using calipers I want to carefully measure both of these two sides four side a my calipers read one point eight five four inches and four side B they read one point nine zero two inches now we're going to record both of those numbers down on this piece of wood in order to do our calculations and I'll take a snapshot of this block at the end for the five cut method in case you want to keep that for the future so the math for the five cut method is we subtract B from a so we go a minus B which is one point eight five four – one point nine zero – that will give me a negative zero point zero four eight inches it's important to keep that negative and write that down that's going to make the difference of which way we move our fence for the next step we're going to have to divide that by the four cuts that we made cutting around the perimeter of this piece of wood that amounts to the cumulative error that we built up making those cuts divided out we have a negative zero point zero one two inches that's the total error divided over this entire length of the eight to be board length which is eleven and a half inches so if I want to know the error per inch I will need to divide that by the eleven and a half length eleven and a half inch length of that board and that will get me down to a total of negative 0.001 inches so that's basically pretty good that means my cut is out by a thousandth of an inch for every linear inch of cut but we can actually be quite a bit more accurate than that we can try to adjust the fence on the crosscut sled to take that error out so I can take that number the negative one one thousandth of an inch in error for each inch of cut multiply that times the fence lengths are more specifically the 28 inches between the two pivot screws on the fence to get the total error that my fence is out and I see that will leave me with 28 1000 negative 0.02 eight inches of error total and adjusting the fence by that amount should correct the error and bring us to practically perfect one final note that is very important if our number is a negative number that means we're going to have to move the fence in if it were positive we'd move the fence out but in our case it's negative so we will move it in and I'll explain why that is in just a minute so I'm going to leave a snapshot of this here in case you want to keep a copy of that for future reference I've created a small illustration to show which way you move the fence for a negative number the black line represents the offcut and in my case the top was narrower than the bottom so when I subtract the bottom from the top I have a negative number in order for me to get this to go straight I have to move it that way which means I have to move the fence forward so a negative number means the fence must move forward so our calculations have told us that we need to move the fence forward by 28 thousandths of an inch so I'm getting the 0.025 and the point zero zero three blades from my feeler gauge I'm gonna put those together and hold them snugly against my fence I've got a piece of wood that I've cut to a sharp point to push this snuggly against those blades I'm simply going to clamp this board into place with a pair of clamps so that it doesn't move and I'll check and make sure the fit is nice and snug for the blades there and then once I remove the blades and remove the screw at the bottom I can move the fence forward by exactly point zero to eight inches once we have it in place we're going to want to clamp it down snugly which you can see we've done there and then we're gonna have to pre-drill and put in another screw we can't use the existing hole because it'll just track back out and probably move the fence back to where it was now we only want to put in one screw at this point because we're going to want to test that five cut method one more time and make sure that our adjustment has worked I'm just going to quickly speed through this process for the second time and not explain it again it's exactly the same as I did the first time in the end my calculation showed that I had about 1.8 10 thousandths of an inch of error for each inch of cut or if I cut a 10 inch piece then from one end to the other it would be out about 1.8 thousandths and that's really good and I'm happy with that now that the sled is done I want to put a little safety block at the back this will help remind me not to put my hand there the saw blade in fact must cut all the way through the fence to make many of the cuts I'm going to glue it on securely and I'll go ahead and screw it through the front as well for the stop block I have chosen a Craig stop this is the Craig production stop and it's really designed for a shorter fence but for a crosscut sled my fence needs to be taller so I'm gonna drill out these two holes here inside of the aluminum and I'm going to tap them in order to allow me to screw on a wooden block that will extend all the way to the bottom there really aren't any other great options for a stop and the Craig stop is extremely accurate with the lens that allows me to read the tape measure with high precision and after screwing this in place we'll have a very nice production stop then I'm going to turn my attention to the measuring tape that gets mounted to the top of the Craig top track I took a square thin piece of plywood that measured to be twelve and a half inches wide and placed that between the stop and the blade then I just pencil marked the location of that crosshair on the stop I'm going to begin applying the tape measure using that 12 and a half inch mark on the tape measure and keeping that in line with the pencil mark of course this isn't exact but I'll show you how to dial it in to perfect once the tape measures down peeling off the backing as they proceed to the left I'll just firmly press the tape measure down onto the fence top we'll need some snips to cut it because the Craig tape measures are actually metal and just follow the same procedure all the way to the right to get it fully down I've moved the stop over to 12 inches exactly and I'm going to crosscut the board next I want to measure the exact width of the board very very carefully in this case it turned out to be exactly 1/16 of an inch less than 12 so I unscrewed the lens move the lens over that 1/16 and now it's perfect to confirm I'm just going to go ahead and crosscut another board add an arbitrary measurement and see if it's exact I always take great care to dial in my measuring stops because I don't like to use a measuring tape every time I want to crosscut something to a certain size I much prefer to rely on the stop for that it saves a lot of time in the shop and I had to set my stop for 6 inches exactly and I took several careful measurements of this and the board was indeed exactly 6 inches wide so I'm satisfied with that I just wanted to quickly show you how I use these hold downs sometimes you cut something that's very delicate or your hands might not be free to hold it board down or you might not want to get your hands very close to the blade by having the T track embedded into your crosscut sled you can use these hold downs to safely hold a board for you and I just keep them snugged down and tucked away at the top when they're not in use you can also remove them if you prefer but they're never in my way so I always leave them at the top I will show you how I made this attachment for this miter sled without any really math or calculations to do it and this is the only one that I know of anywhere on YouTube that allows you to make exactly perfect 45-degree cuts there are many people who make miter sled attachment to go with their crosscut sled and the the line of thinking is that as long as the angle up here is square meaning ninety degrees that you're going to get perfect miters and that just isn't true what's really critical is that the angle here is 45 degrees if that's not true then you have a problem if this is 90 but it's offset then of your two picture frame components one might be forty four one might be forty six and when they go to put the picture frame together it's never gonna work out here's kind of a proof we know that this is now ninety but I could draw this line here maybe something like this and we clearly know that these two are not the same angles now those are both not forty-five degrees so it's critical if you're going to make a miter attachment for your sled that you have exactly 45 degrees here and exactly 45 degrees here and this method is the only method that I could come up with that would do exactly that so to elaborate on the 44 degree 46 degree scenario problem here I'm going to just take and draw a couple of short sections of the picture frame and if this one here is at if this angle is at 44 degrees and this angle is different but this angles at 46 degrees then the length from here to here will be different than the length from here to here so this length might be say 1 and 7/16 of an inch in this length since the angle is steeper will actually be shorter it might be 1 and 5/16 of an inch so that becomes a big problem if we're drawing our picture frame when we actually put our picture frame together and it comes to here then the top part of the frame along this distance will end up being shorter than the bottom part of the frame they don't align correctly because the links from here to here is different from the links from here to here the angles will meet up so you have a clean line but the lengths of these two edges will be different and be very obvious when you build your picture frame and if your picture frame if we look at the side profile of the picture frame and if it's something that has a decorative molded cut to it then all of these curves and contours won't line up with each other on the two sides now I'll show you exactly how to make a 45-45-90 triangle and you can use this on any sled it doesn't have to be this sled in particular it starts by making two squares I am using 3/4 inch plywood here you could use really any material and all you needed to do is make two perfect squares I didn't even actually measure mine they look like they're somewhere between three and four inches that's all that matters is that they're the exact same size then I'm just going to take those two squares put them together and put them all the way to the edge of a bigger board the bigger board is the one I'm gonna cut the triangle from I didn't measure the bigger board either but you probably want to check and make sure this fits on your sled before you make the cut now I just want to tape these squares in place so that they don't move the square on the right is what's going to stay in place and then the square on the left here I'm gonna go ahead and cut it off it was really there just to hold a place so you might have noticed that empty void where that square was is actually now a perfect 45-45-90 triangle and I'm going to place that against the back of my fence before I make the cut I just want to make sure that both of those two corner points touch the fence perfectly before I make this cut the rules of geometry tell us that if those two sides that are adjacent to the 90-degree corner are the exact same length and they are here because I removed a perfect square then we have a 45-45-90 triangle as a result my large board here is actually being held at 45 degrees to the blade and remember this isn't something that I measured this is something that we cut based upon the rules of geometry so it's exactly 45 it's not accurate to a degree or a tenth of a degree like I had mentioned before it's exact and it's just as easy as that the board that is coming off here is a perfect 45-45-90 triangle we can check the fit with the combination square but the combination square isn't nearly accurate enough to show how precise this is I thought I would take the time to make a quick picture frame here to show you how exactly it works and how accurate it is so the system for using this method is you'll start with your picture frame molding and you'll cut your top and bottom to equal length square and then your two sides to equal length square and then we will drop in the 45-45-90 triangle I'll clamp the triangle down with a toggle clamp and I'll have links to where to buy the stuff for this toggle clamp in the description and then we're going to slide the piece of picture frame molding up against the 45-degree triangle there and then slide it backward until it touches the fence the exact position of the triangle is not at all critical it just has to be past the point of where the cross cut blade will come through you may cut off the tip of the triangle but that won't hurt anything once the first side of all four frame pieces are cut we'll flip the triangle to the other side and cut the other half of all four frame pieces and that's absolutely it I just put a piece of masking tape upside down on my table saw to stick these two and then we'll wrap it up tape it together and take a look at the fit this picture frame in real time took about two minutes to make it's the simplest most accurate method that I know of to make picture frames it's even more accurate than my incra mitre 5000 now I'm going to show you how I make a dado cut or more specifically how I use the dado blade to make a tenon first thing I do is switch insert plates in this case since my jig is brand new I'm gonna go ahead and put in a new insert plate and I've got to run the blade up through it to get the cut open to whatever the width my dado blade is and I'm going to move my stop block over to the other side of the fence and set that up for whatever the length of tenon that I'm looking for if I were using a much bigger board to cut a tenon I would just take the bolts out and use the Kreg stop itself as the stopping point for the edge of the tenon board what I like about this method of cutting Tenon's is I just rotate the board all the way around as I make my cuts and it gives me a perfect shoulder all the way it's an extremely fast way to put a tenon on the end of a board total set-up time and cutting of the tenon is probably between one and two minutes and you can take a look at that shoulder all the way around it's a pretty good-looking tenon and that wraps up the video for our extreme table saw sled if you're interested in getting plans for this project I do have them for sale for a small fee on our website yeah all fees for plan sales go to help support the channel thank you very much for watching and if you liked the video please consider subscribing you

39 – Extreme Crosscut Table Saw Sled with Perfect Miter & Dado & Removable Zero Clearance Insert

26 thoughts on “39 – Extreme Crosscut Table Saw Sled with Perfect Miter & Dado & Removable Zero Clearance Insert

  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Great stuff! This will be my next shop project

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    i think your band saw blade is dull…. you have burt sawdust lol! Nice build!!

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    34:33 As much as I admire your solution, the reasons behind it are flawed. The line of the cut on opposite sides of the board will both be the same length. Still it makes sense to use your solution.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Buen trabajo. Muy profesional.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    I assume that you would want to modify the removable bit to be on whichever side your blade tilts too. And that you might have inserts for common angles like 45. My blade tilts to the left, so I'd reverse for that on mine. Looks great!

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Exceptional video!
    One question… why in important to have zero play slot insert piece. Is it to prevent ripping wood at the cut exit?

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    "Advanced Kung Fu technique" genius.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    How did your get the hold-down bolts into the track? It appears that the tracks are blocked by the fences.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Pretty cool. One suggestion; the T track in the sled….unless you install the hold down clamps permanently you cannot get them installed without either taking out one or both tracks or removing the front fence and then reversing the process in order to get going again. If they are permanently installed then they will be in the way when cutting a large piece. If not, well, you have a frustrating hassle to use what was designed to be a convenience being the opposite. I suggest cutting the T track short enough to slip in the clamps at the planned gap at the end of the T track. I'm making mine now and that is my plan.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Very well done, sir! I wished I would have ran across your channel years ago…..it would have no doubt been very beneficial!

    I am curious as to why you wouldn't use a large 45-90-45 drafting triangle to make the 45 cut? As an old draftsman, that's what I used with great results.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Very nicely done. Thanks for your effort and teaching.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Best video I've seen for making a sled. I'm a newbie and this video was just perfect.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    That is great I just ordered the 1st large machine for my new shop. A Jet II table saw w/50” rip capacity. This sled is going to be my first project.
    Thanks for putting all the hardware links. Keep on doing what you love, you and your girls are great at it !!!

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Thanks for the vid

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    This is a great amalgamation of the many sleds I've seen. I really like how you handled the solution to using dado set blades by using the various sized inserts. I saw a sliding insert setup on the Woodsmith Shop channel, but this is a bit less complex to set up. Well done! I'm going to build my sled based on yours.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Outstanding tutorial.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Like the Code 187 MDK reference from Demolition Man on your safety block.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    great video, but at 38:48 or so, the perfect 45 is the piece you are NOT using. the side with the green tape is the perfect 45 to the cut. the piece you used works, but is only as good as the "perfect" 90 degrees to the green tape side. to test this out make the sides not parallel and you will see. it will not work with piece you are using. Of the hundreds of sled videos I like this and the almost perfect 45. I am headed to the garage with my notes from this to complete my first sled and miter attachment.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Yep, I just got a Delta commercial table saw and once I get it fully restored to proper working order this will be the first thing I make. Awesome video with the detailed instructions, your plan for this sled is going to be one plan I do buy. Thanks for the video.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    those inserts are a good plan !

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Any particular reason you can't use corner clamps or a triangle square?

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Hi James, i was wondering if you would be willing to do a video on setting up your jointer? i just got my first one (G0857) and could use a good visual and explanation. Thanks in advance.

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    Excellent explanation and demonstration. One adjustment to bring the fence back and the next error was .000975. I’m good with that!

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  • June 3, 2019 at 3:27 pm
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    I invented a new Power saw named "Parallel Guided Power Saw" you can see here on you tube under this name. Do you think your shop would benefit having my saw?  I wish a partner to manufacture my saw.

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