Code blue, level 0: Diagnostic Imaging. Code blue, level 0: Diagnostic Imaging. Hey guys. I’m Siobhan, a 3rd-year medical resident. Right now it’s Saturday morning and I’m heading to the hospital to start a 26-hour call shift in the intensive care unit. Oh, good morning Siobhan. Morning, how was the night? It was great actually. Yeah? I had a new patient come in. It’s a really interesting story, so I was hoping for your advice. Each morning we do a handover where the resident who was on call overnight passes on information to the incoming resident. So Kevin and I discussed each patient one-by-one so that I’m up to date on everything. And a lot can change in just 1 night in the ICU. Oh Kevin, I just realized thinking as I found you before you left, I didn’t get the pager from you. Oh yeah, here you go! Oh, okay. Here we go. Now it’s time to meet up with the attending physician and together we’ll walk around and see our 14 patients. And then comes the less glamorous part of medicine: all the notes and paperwork. *Pager goes off* Code blue, level 0: Diagnostic Imaging. Code blue, level 0: Diagnostic Imaging. When I arrived at the CT scanner, the patient was lying unconscious and a nurse was doing CPR. Seconds later the anesthetist arrived, positioning herself behind the patient’s head. Skillfully she intubated the patient while CPR was ongoing. And just 2 minutes later another round of CPR was done and we got a pulse back. Ok, so it always feels really good when you get the patient back. So our patient now has a heartbeat, a blood pressure… We basically brought him back to life, but this is just the beginning of the work in ICU. We’re transferring the patient up to the ICU right now and we’re gonna continue to try to resuscitate him, figure out what caused the cardiac arrest and then go from there. So this is just the beginning of the night in ICU. First thing I’m gonna do is try to call the patient’s family to update them. Still no answer. Okay, I’m gonna call back again later or see if someone can track down another number. The next step is to read through the patient’s chart carefully, looking through old notes, X-rays and blood work to help figure out what caused his cardiac arrest. Okay, so it looks like there are actually a lot of things going on with this patient. He has underlying heart disease, he’s had a heart attack in the past, he’s had some funny rhythms in the past that I can see in the computer. Plus his x-ray clearly shows an infection and I wonder if he’s gonna have an infection in his blood too. I’m kind of waiting for that to grow. So it’s a couple things we can do: we’re gonna make sure we manage his blood pressure with some special medications called pressors, which kind of squeeze the blood vessels tight. We’re gonna give antibiotics and we’re gonna support him and continue to do some more investigations. And let’s actually call the family back again. We’re trying to try to get ahold of them. I’ve got a new number, so we’ll see. Hi, my name is Siobhan. I’m a doctor in the ICU. Can I ask who I’m speaking with? Great, okay. Well, I look forward to meeting you in person. Again, I’m so sorry to have to tell you this over the phone. Okay, see you soon. I find it so much more difficult to break bad news to people over the phone, because you just… You don’t get that kind of feedback from body language, someone’s facial expression. You don’t… You have no clue what they’re feeling, what they’re thinking. So anyway, I’ll meet the family when they come in and I think I’ll get a better sense of where they’re at. In order to give all these medications safely at the same time, it’s helpful to insert a central line, which is basically a large IV that I’ll be inserting into the patient’s neck right into the jugular vein. Because the vein is so close to the carotid artery, I’ll be using an ultrasound machine so that I can see exactly where my needle is at all times. Okay, so the central line went in well. So now we just need to actually order a chest x-ray to make sure it’s going in the right place. Meaning it’s in the vein and it’s not in the artery, cuz that would be a nightmare. So it’s something you worry about. And then we also look for any complications, make sure there’s no pneumothorax. So it didn’t actually puncture the lungs, all these things that you would never ever ever want to do to a patient, but they’re complications that are possible even when you use ultrasound. So we’re just going to double check with the x-ray, but I think everything’s fine. How much oxygen is she on? Oh you already intubated here?! Oh okay. Yeah, absolutely. Okay, I’ll come by soon. Alright, thanks. So that was the emerge doc and it sounds like he just intubated a woman, which automatically means that the patient is being admitted to the ICU. Because once you’ve been admitted and you’re hooked up to a machine breathing for you, the only place you can go is the ICU. So that makes it easy. But the reason this patient got intubated is because she came in just gasping for air, breathing super fast and she has a condition called COPD. So she’s been a really heavy smoker for the last 40 years, smoking about 2 packs per day, that’s what he’s telling me. In the emergency department I met with the patient’s husband. He tells me that his wife ran out of her puffers about a week ago. They planned on going to the doctor today, but her breathing became so severe that they came to the emergency department instead. So now I’m gonna prescribe some steroids puffers, antibiotics and hopefully her breathing will improve and we can get her extubated in a few days. Alright. So now that we have admitted that patient in the emerge, we need to follow up on some blood work on the patient who had that code blue. So I ordered some repeat blood work, so we can see what we’re at in terms of resuscitating and how he is doing: his heart, lungs, liver, kidney, all of that stuff. So, let’s see. Oh boy. Okay, so when blood work is abnormal, it turns red and unfortunately most of his blood work right here is red. So you can see that he’s got strain to the heart, even just the act of CPR is gonna put some strain on the heart, the muscle of the heart. Um, you can see he’s got shock liver, meaning he didn’t get great blood flow to the liver for a period of time. Which means that you can see those enzymes are up. Same thing with the kidneys. So I mean… The reality is it’s expected at this point. We’re gonna keep giving him fluids, we’re giving the antibiotics. I’m gonna repeat some more blood work in the morning and hopefully we’ll be able to see things trending in a better direction, because right now it’s not looking so great. Okay, but let’s actually let’s go see the patient himself and see what he looks like clinically. So is he looking any better?! Okay, 4 o’clock. Finally back in my call room. I’m actually gonna try to go to sleep for the first time today. But I’m this weird combination of being a little bit wired from all the admissions and the excitement and then I’m also exhausted from the day. So I’m pretty sure when my head hits the pillow, I will be able to sleep. Problem is the light, it’s all the way over here and away from the bed. Good morning. Okay, it’s time to look at blood work and to get ready to hand over to the morning team now. Okay, so just looking at the blood work from the patient with the code blue yesterday. Things look like they are at least holding steady right now, which honestly is all that we can ask for right now. I’m glad to see that he’s turning the corner and stabilizing. So we’ll know in the next 24-48 hours are gonna be critical to finding out about his long-term prognosis, but I think we’re making some good steps forward right now. Morning, Kevin. Hey Siobhan. Hey, you’re back again. I’m back again. Alright, so I need to tell you about some of the patients that you handed over and what happened today. Yeah. Okay, but I won’t forget to give you the pager. Responsibility is all yours… For another 24 hours. Heading home, finally done and that was a satisfying call shift. I really feel like being there really impacted someone’s life. So I’m walking away at a high. But anyway, if you have any questions if you want to say hi, just leave a comment. I really love to hear from you guys. And if you want to see more like this, don’t forget to subscribe. Otherwise, I’ll be chatting with you in the next video. So bye for now!

26 HOUR CALL SHIFT with CODE BLUE EMERGENCY: Day in the Life of a Doctor

100 thoughts on “26 HOUR CALL SHIFT with CODE BLUE EMERGENCY: Day in the Life of a Doctor

  • September 28, 2019 at 11:42 pm
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    It's kool to have met someone who works in the same city I come from and that u took such great care of my brother

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  • September 28, 2019 at 11:43 pm
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    Wow. You are an inspiration. Keep doing what you 💕

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  • September 28, 2019 at 11:44 pm
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    Love your explanations 😊

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  • September 28, 2019 at 11:55 pm
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    nurses and doctors are a godsend. Thankyou for doing what you do.

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  • September 28, 2019 at 11:56 pm
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    Love your videos!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:04 am
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    I've seen the central line a few times in your vlogs … still almost faint every time 🙃😰

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:04 am
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    Thoroughly enjoying your videos (new find for me) Nice to see a Canadian face in medicine … I'm curious though, why Indiana for university? Was it simply for the music or was medicine studied at McMasters? Finally if you studied in the states … what was the attitude of your american peers going to practice in Canada?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:06 am
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    I just learned how to do CPR this week!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:11 am
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    you truly inspire me.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:17 am
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    Do all medical residents respond to code's or just a certain team?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:21 am
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    What do you think you want to do after your Residency?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:34 am
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    Im an Xray Tech and I love watching your videos. I love seeing the different POV and understanding what happens behind the scenes. (:

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:34 am
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    Honestly love watching your videos!! It motivates me more to become a doctor. Thank you for sharing these story’s.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:44 am
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    Working crazy hours as a doctor. Filming and editing videos to inform and entertain people most of whom she will never meet? Has anyone ever told you that you're amazing?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:47 am
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    Almost every person I have ever worked with in the ICU and Anesthesia, seems like they hate their job or life…you guys think she seems this happy and relaxed off camera?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:48 am
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    Hey! 😎

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:49 am
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    You're amazing

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:50 am
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    This is so weird! Today was homecoming day and one of the football players fell unconscious (it was extremely hot out) and wouldn't respond, later on (after they got him breathing again bc he stopped breathing) we found out he broke his neck

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:56 am
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    Love your videos! Really gives some good info and an idea on how you life is as a resident. Really inspiring to look at. I too am hoping to become a physician one day. How many hours does a resident typically work a week?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 12:56 am
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    Love her freckles, so PRETTY!!!!!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:00 am
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    Welcome back..! We missed you 🎻 🎻

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:03 am
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    My uncle had COPD ultimately he died from it, but that was 10 years ago

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:03 am
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    I stumbled upon your channel one day while looking for something to watch and I'm so glad I did. I live in Florida in the US, probably as far away from you in Canada as I could get lol but I LOVE watching your videos. You have so much enthusiasm for life its contagious.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:07 am
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    Thrilling, , Heart Pounding, A Rush of excitement. (Remember This) Leadership is dependent on natural ability, discretion, will power, and determination. Forceful ambition, intelligent judgement, and season wisdom are the essentials of material success. One last thing. Women, however, has always been the moral standard-bearer and the spiritual leader of mankind. The hand that rocks the cradle still fraternizes with destiny. I thought you may like that. -Timothy

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:08 am
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    Great seeing another video!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:09 am
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    I know that you're not giving out the names of the patients or showing any faces, but isn't it risky to share information on a patient's situation and health? Also, wouldn't recording while on call possibly lead to a lawsuit if something were to happen to one of your patients at the same time that it is found that you were recording a video? I'm just thinking about HIPAA and all of this other stuff in mind. (I'm in Nursing school and we have been told that we aren't allowed to do this kind of stuff.)

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:14 am
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    Where do you get the time to edit the videos WOW! 💪

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:19 am
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    great video as always… watching them makes me more exited to start my training to become a medical resident

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:28 am
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    THIRD YEAR MEDICAL RESIDENT 💜 happy to hear you say that!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:29 am
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    * looks at page *
    Aight imma head out

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:33 am
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    Can you make an update video for us? Talking about how much schooling and residency you have left? What are your next steps? I’m curious to know!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:34 am
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    Good video. 👍🐰

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:36 am
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    I was standing in the store checking my phone. Your notification popped up I gasped so loud everyone just stopped. Love your vids! Missed you!!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:40 am
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    I honestly enjoy these videos soo much. Even though im not going into medicine studies its so fun to watch

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:47 am
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    I have to admit I was eyeing your stethoscope with envy. It is a Littmann Cardiology IV in matte black finish right? A 26-hour shift sounds like an improvement from what I used to hear from others who used to do 72-hr shifts back in the day.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:51 am
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    Siobhan, your videos and your love for your profession are seriously making me reconsider what I want to study in college 😂💕 much love!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:53 am
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    I want to be a Doctor. And you really inspire me. Do you read DM?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:54 am
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    When you guys have a post code patient, if they meet criteria, do you initiate targeted temperature management (hypothermia protocol)? I wasn’t sure if all facilities had this protocol.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 1:55 am
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    I absolutely ❤️ watching your videos! I get so excited when I see you uploaded a new one!!

    Also, I have a question. Very random… I have seen you drink tea in your videos. How do you drink your tea? Cream and/or sugar?? Or maybe just black??

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:03 am
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    At my facility the nurses will usually call the family (not the patient's nurse or charge nurse) and we can't tell them they're currently doing CPR but that's it's an emergency and we need them at the hospital immediately.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:05 am
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    Hi! Love your channel. Keep them coming.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:13 am
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    Looks so much fun!!!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:20 am
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    Man I would totally suck as doctor mortality rate 1000%

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:24 am
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    i wish you were my doctor. id be in the er once a week

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:30 am
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    Now In the icu
    Are the patients awake, are they attached to tubes
    What kind of patients are there

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:32 am
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    Propoffers

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:33 am
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    You are what the world needs!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:34 am
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    I was on “pressers” for 10 months leading up to heart transplant. They definitely do the trick but they aren’t much fun. Thankfully mine were delivered via PICC.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:37 am
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    I’ve coded three times with a pe. A month later we found a second pe this time a bilateral saddle pe. Turns out I have a second inferior vena cava which let the clot skip the filter I have. Today I went to the er since I was having chest pains but turns out it was anxiety. I appreciate the hard work of the entire medical teams I’ve been cared for by!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:38 am
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    I love your videos! They’re always entertaining from start to end. It’s so interesting and so informative. Sometimes I feel like I’m right there in the hospital, with the adrenaline rush when something happens 😄

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:41 am
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    That pager looks pretty Germy and gross lol – thanks for the great video- love all your videos

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:43 am
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    not to be *that* person but Kevin is so cute LOL

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:46 am
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    You are one amazing human Siobhan. I’ve been binge watching you for the last few days, going from first year to third resident, it’s just incredible.
    You can’t be thanked enough for what you do.
    Love from Australia 🇦🇺💜

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:46 am
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    I lost my mom on monday ..there was a code blue too..but my mom didnt come back

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:52 am
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    Why couldn’t you use a regular IV port? Just curious

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  • September 29, 2019 at 2:59 am
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    i love your positivity 🙂

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:00 am
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    Thank you for all that you do Siobhan!! You take it all in stride and help make medicine understandable. You're a real credit to the Ontario medical system. Sorry you have to deal with all of the cutbacks happening more and more. Keep up the great work and awesome videos. Love looking back to see your updated intros from 1st year, to 2nd and now to 3rd year!!!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:05 am
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    Love your videos I find them so interesting to watch. I was just curious how are you allowed to film in a hospital, did you have to get a lot of permission before you started to vlog ? ☺️

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:07 am
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    Hi Siobhan!!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:08 am
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    My heart gets so happy and warm everytime she says "third year medical resident" I'm so happy for you and how far you've come.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:10 am
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    Just wanted to say hi!!! Absolutely love your videos need more doctors like you. Love you!! ❤️💜 keep it up 😊👍🏻

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:16 am
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    Hi!. I’m a Registered Nurse working in Australia. I love your videos especially the one about “do drs bother nurses” 😂😂❤️

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:19 am
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    That pager handover *tears*!!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:23 am
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    Have you done any rounds in Paediatrics? Or have you had much experience with children?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:29 am
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    I really love your videos. They're so interesting. I love to learn more.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:34 am
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    I don’t know how you work such long shifts. I just worked 12 hour shift at dominos and it was so hard. Keep up the good work

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:35 am
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    How does she works a 26 hour shift and edit and uploads a YouTube video
    Love the vids btw

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:36 am
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    My favorite day of the week! Thanks a much for your videos. I learn from them, as an ER nurse.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:39 am
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    Ya should talk about paranormal things you heard or seen

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:40 am
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    I have a question: Do you actually carry your camera during a code blue while you run? Or you do re-enact it?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:43 am
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    How do you not break down in tears when you have to deliver bad news/deal with difficult, sad issues?? I want to be a nurse but I am so scared I would just break down during an emergency!!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:43 am
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    Hey Siobhan! I really enjoy your videos. They're very educational and eye-opening. You've really made the industry that you're part of quite visible! I'm curious as to whether you have ever received any backlash? Thanks!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:48 am
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    Thank you for sharing. I love what I learn when I watch your videos!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 3:54 am
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    Love your content! You're amazing! I'm so excited to apply to med school after finishing my BSN!

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:03 am
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    Watching your videos makes me want to go back to school.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:06 am
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    How many days in the week do you work these long hour shifts

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:10 am
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    I love your videos so much thanks for taking the time to film edit and upload amongst your crazy busy schedule. Much love and hugs from N. ON.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:14 am
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    I’m always excited to see your videos I learn so much about medical work your amazing 😉💜💝

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:17 am
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    Missed your vlogs. Love them.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:19 am
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    This is why I carry a living will around my neck in a packet and DNR tattooed down my sternum. I had to fill the paperwork 3 times. No matter how young you are – have a power of attorney. Have a living will. Know what care you want during your life – and at the end. I don't know about in Canada. It's a witch with a "B" to get everything in line in case I drop dead or get hit by a bus.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:22 am
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    Love your videos.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:24 am
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    Soo..is it just me or did that ring on her (seemingly) left ring finger appear over night?? 👀👀

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 4:24 am
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    Love your videos!!

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 4:28 am
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    Great to see another video!!

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 4:30 am
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    I catch random episodes of this since you first popped up on my feed and based off how you describe your critical results and from an earlier episode I gather that you are using the Epic EMR, right? I teach hospital staff on it and have helped other physicians learn to navigate it and I was just curious what your feelings were on it? ^_^

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 4:35 am
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    Hey Doc back really hurts, think I could get 12 kilos of morphine?😌

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:47 am
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    Love watching your videos! I am an RPN from the niagara area trying to get a hospital job. Its so hard here unless you're an RN. Its a lot easier to get a RPN hospital job in the Hamilton area. I might be applying in your area once im more comfortable with highway driving :).

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:58 am
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    These long hours shifts will take a toll on her body someday

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:58 am
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    Simply Amazing

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  • September 29, 2019 at 4:58 am
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    I love these videos

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  • September 29, 2019 at 5:14 am
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    Would love Info on heartattacks, doctors here confuse me with their terms and unfortunately.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 5:28 am
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    I'm a newly registered nurse in ICU and I love watching your vlogs, Siobhan! It's eye-opening seeing what a doctor's shift looks like. I learn so much from you! Thank you for taking the time to show your shift while also maintaining patient privacy! 🙂

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 5:31 am
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    I'm a very simple nerdy pre-med, I see Siobhan uploaded a 26 hour call shift vlog, I click

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  • September 29, 2019 at 5:34 am
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    This channel is amazing and my favorite on YouTube! I’ve played the violin since I was five (but started asking when I was two) and I’ve wanted to be in medicine- a general pediatrician/ pediatric emergency physician since I was about three. You’re a role model and what I aspire to be one day.💞

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  • September 29, 2019 at 5:55 am
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    I discovered your channel last week and I cant stop watching. just turned my post notification on! I never had interest in medical stuff till now, u make it so interesting and engaging. UPLOAD MORE OFTEN if u can plzz. love you ❤❤❤

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 5:58 am
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    I remember waking up from surgery when I was a teen and the nurses telling me I had a central line in… But it was at my elbow crease… Is there a difference between one there and in the neck? I should probably just google it.

    I remember watching them take it out and it seemed like a magic trick… they started pulling it out from my arm and the line just seemed like it went forever.

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  • September 29, 2019 at 6:00 am
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    If I ever have to go back to the hospital I want her to take care of me 😭 she’s so kind and adorable ☺️☺️

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  • September 29, 2019 at 6:24 am
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    I know with all my heart, all I want to study is medicine. I feel as though I live vicariously through you and I’m receiving “experience” or “expectations”. Well I guess I’m just trying to say GREAT WORK DOCTOR

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  • September 29, 2019 at 7:01 am
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    does vlogging ever get in the way of your job being done without errors?

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  • September 29, 2019 at 7:15 am
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    Why do I always end up watching your videos when it’s 3am ? Like I’m not even in the medical field or anything lol 😂 love your videos though! Keep em coming, I need something to do when I procrastinate sleeping.

    Reply

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